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Longitudinal Study of the Decline in Renal Function in Healthy Subjects.

Baba M, Shimbo T, Horio M, Ando M, Yasuda Y, Komatsu Y, Masuda K, Matsuo S, Maruyama S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The mean (±SD) eGFR decline rate was ‒1.07±0.42 ml/min/1.73 m2/year (‒1.29±0.41%/year) in subjects with a mean eGFR of 81.5±11.6 ml/min/1.73 m2.The present study clarified for the first time the reference values for the rate of eGFR decline stratified by gender, age, and renal stage in healthy subjects.The rate of eGFR decline depended mainly on baseline eGFR, but not on age, with a slower decline with a lower baseline eGFR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Preventive Medicine, St. Luke's Affiliated Clinic, St. Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic kidney disease is an important concern in preventive medicine, but the rate of decline in renal function in healthy population is not well defined. The purpose of this study was to determine reference values for the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and rate of decline of eGFR in healthy subjects and to evaluate factors associated with this decline using a large cohort in Japan.

Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were performed with healthy subjects aged ≥18 years old who received a medical checkup. Reference values for eGFR were obtained using a nonparametric method and those for decline of eGFR were calculated by mixed model analysis. Relationships of eGFR decline rate with baseline variables were examined using a linear least-squares method.

Results: In the cross-sectional study, reference values for eGFR were obtained by gender and age in 72,521 healthy subjects. The mean (±SD) eGFR was 83.7±14.7 ml/min/1.73 m2. In the longitudinal study, reference values for eGFR decline rate were obtained by gender, age, and renal stage in 45,586 healthy subjects. In the same renal stage, there was little difference in the rate of decline regardless of age. The decline in eGFR depended on the renal stage and was strongly related to baseline eGFR, with a faster decline with a higher baseline eGFR and a slower decline with a lower baseline eGFR. The mean (±SD) eGFR decline rate was ‒1.07±0.42 ml/min/1.73 m2/year (‒1.29±0.41%/year) in subjects with a mean eGFR of 81.5±11.6 ml/min/1.73 m2.

Conclusions: The present study clarified for the first time the reference values for the rate of eGFR decline stratified by gender, age, and renal stage in healthy subjects. The rate of eGFR decline depended mainly on baseline eGFR, but not on age, with a slower decline with a lower baseline eGFR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphs of the rate of eGFR decline in healthy men and women by renal stage and age group.The mean slope for each stratified component by gender, age and renal stage in Tables 3 and 4 is plotted on the y-axis, and age group and renal stage are plotted on the x-axis. When the slope was stratified by renal stage and gender, all lines ran almost parallel with the x-axis showing age group (left side).When the slope was stratified by age group and gender, all lines almost overlapped (right side). There was little difference in slope within the same renal stage regardless of age, whereas the slope changed depending on the renal stage. The slope was steeper when baseline eGFR was higher (i.e. better renal function) and shallower when baseline eGFR was lower (i.e. renal stage changed from G1 to G3b).
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pone.0129036.g003: Graphs of the rate of eGFR decline in healthy men and women by renal stage and age group.The mean slope for each stratified component by gender, age and renal stage in Tables 3 and 4 is plotted on the y-axis, and age group and renal stage are plotted on the x-axis. When the slope was stratified by renal stage and gender, all lines ran almost parallel with the x-axis showing age group (left side).When the slope was stratified by age group and gender, all lines almost overlapped (right side). There was little difference in slope within the same renal stage regardless of age, whereas the slope changed depending on the renal stage. The slope was steeper when baseline eGFR was higher (i.e. better renal function) and shallower when baseline eGFR was lower (i.e. renal stage changed from G1 to G3b).

Mentions: The mean slope for each stratified component in Tables 3 and 4 was plotted on the y-axis, and age group and renal stage were plotted on the x-axis (Fig 3). With stratification by renal stage and gender, all lines ran almost parallel with the x-axis for age group (Fig 3, left side). Thus, there was little difference in the slope of eGFR decline within the same renal stage at all ages. In contrast, with stratification by age group and gender, all lines almost overlapped (Fig 3, right side), indicating that the influence of renal stage on the slope was greater than that of age. Furthermore, the slope was steeper in subjects with better renal function and became shallower as the renal stage advanced (Fig 3).


Longitudinal Study of the Decline in Renal Function in Healthy Subjects.

Baba M, Shimbo T, Horio M, Ando M, Yasuda Y, Komatsu Y, Masuda K, Matsuo S, Maruyama S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Graphs of the rate of eGFR decline in healthy men and women by renal stage and age group.The mean slope for each stratified component by gender, age and renal stage in Tables 3 and 4 is plotted on the y-axis, and age group and renal stage are plotted on the x-axis. When the slope was stratified by renal stage and gender, all lines ran almost parallel with the x-axis showing age group (left side).When the slope was stratified by age group and gender, all lines almost overlapped (right side). There was little difference in slope within the same renal stage regardless of age, whereas the slope changed depending on the renal stage. The slope was steeper when baseline eGFR was higher (i.e. better renal function) and shallower when baseline eGFR was lower (i.e. renal stage changed from G1 to G3b).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4464887&req=5

pone.0129036.g003: Graphs of the rate of eGFR decline in healthy men and women by renal stage and age group.The mean slope for each stratified component by gender, age and renal stage in Tables 3 and 4 is plotted on the y-axis, and age group and renal stage are plotted on the x-axis. When the slope was stratified by renal stage and gender, all lines ran almost parallel with the x-axis showing age group (left side).When the slope was stratified by age group and gender, all lines almost overlapped (right side). There was little difference in slope within the same renal stage regardless of age, whereas the slope changed depending on the renal stage. The slope was steeper when baseline eGFR was higher (i.e. better renal function) and shallower when baseline eGFR was lower (i.e. renal stage changed from G1 to G3b).
Mentions: The mean slope for each stratified component in Tables 3 and 4 was plotted on the y-axis, and age group and renal stage were plotted on the x-axis (Fig 3). With stratification by renal stage and gender, all lines ran almost parallel with the x-axis for age group (Fig 3, left side). Thus, there was little difference in the slope of eGFR decline within the same renal stage at all ages. In contrast, with stratification by age group and gender, all lines almost overlapped (Fig 3, right side), indicating that the influence of renal stage on the slope was greater than that of age. Furthermore, the slope was steeper in subjects with better renal function and became shallower as the renal stage advanced (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: The mean (±SD) eGFR decline rate was ‒1.07±0.42 ml/min/1.73 m2/year (‒1.29±0.41%/year) in subjects with a mean eGFR of 81.5±11.6 ml/min/1.73 m2.The present study clarified for the first time the reference values for the rate of eGFR decline stratified by gender, age, and renal stage in healthy subjects.The rate of eGFR decline depended mainly on baseline eGFR, but not on age, with a slower decline with a lower baseline eGFR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Preventive Medicine, St. Luke's Affiliated Clinic, St. Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic kidney disease is an important concern in preventive medicine, but the rate of decline in renal function in healthy population is not well defined. The purpose of this study was to determine reference values for the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and rate of decline of eGFR in healthy subjects and to evaluate factors associated with this decline using a large cohort in Japan.

Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were performed with healthy subjects aged ≥18 years old who received a medical checkup. Reference values for eGFR were obtained using a nonparametric method and those for decline of eGFR were calculated by mixed model analysis. Relationships of eGFR decline rate with baseline variables were examined using a linear least-squares method.

Results: In the cross-sectional study, reference values for eGFR were obtained by gender and age in 72,521 healthy subjects. The mean (±SD) eGFR was 83.7±14.7 ml/min/1.73 m2. In the longitudinal study, reference values for eGFR decline rate were obtained by gender, age, and renal stage in 45,586 healthy subjects. In the same renal stage, there was little difference in the rate of decline regardless of age. The decline in eGFR depended on the renal stage and was strongly related to baseline eGFR, with a faster decline with a higher baseline eGFR and a slower decline with a lower baseline eGFR. The mean (±SD) eGFR decline rate was ‒1.07±0.42 ml/min/1.73 m2/year (‒1.29±0.41%/year) in subjects with a mean eGFR of 81.5±11.6 ml/min/1.73 m2.

Conclusions: The present study clarified for the first time the reference values for the rate of eGFR decline stratified by gender, age, and renal stage in healthy subjects. The rate of eGFR decline depended mainly on baseline eGFR, but not on age, with a slower decline with a lower baseline eGFR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus