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Osteogenic Potential of Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preclinical Studies: A Systematic Review Using Modified ARRIVE and CONSORT Guidelines.

Ramamoorthi M, Bakkar M, Jordan J, Tran SD - Stem Cells Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Methods.Conclusion.Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate the potential use of dental stem cells in bone regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Craniofacial Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Laboratory, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Background and Objective. Dental stem cell-based tissue engineered constructs are emerging as a promising alternative to autologous bone transfer for treating bone defects. The purpose of this review is to systematically assess the preclinical in vivo and in vitro studies which have evaluated the efficacy of dental stem cells on bone regeneration. Methods. A literature search was conducted in Ovid Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science up to October 2014. Implantation of dental stem cells in animal models for evaluating bone regeneration and/or in vitro studies demonstrating osteogenic potential of dental stem cells were included. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used to ensure the quality of the search. Modified ARRIVE (Animal research: reporting in invivo experiments) and CONSORT (Consolidated reporting of trials) were used to critically analyze the selected studies. Results. From 1914 citations, 207 full-text articles were screened and 137 studies were included in this review. Because of the heterogeneity observed in the studies selected, meta-analysis was not possible. Conclusion. Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate the potential use of dental stem cells in bone regeneration. However well-designed randomized animal trials are needed before moving into clinical trials.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart demonstrating the strategy used to identify in vitro and in vivo studies for this systematic review of dental stem cells on bone regeneration (PRISMA guidelines is used to design this search strategy).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Flow chart demonstrating the strategy used to identify in vitro and in vivo studies for this systematic review of dental stem cells on bone regeneration (PRISMA guidelines is used to design this search strategy).

Mentions: A total of 1,914 articles were retrieved from the literature search; 1,480 were excluded because of duplication. Four hundred and thirty-four articles were eligible for title and abstract screening. 227 articles were excluded as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Thus 207 articles were qualified for full-text evaluation. 70 articles were excluded after proofreading the full text. The reasons for exclusion were as follows: odontogenic/dentin/cementum/periodontal ligament regeneration (n = 52), clinical studies (n = 4), reviews (n = 5), language restrictions (n = 7), and multiple reports of the same experiment (n = 2), thus leaving 137 full articles to be included in this systematic qualitative review. The outline of articles selection is summarized in a flow chart (Figure 1). The details of the included studies are described in Table 3.


Osteogenic Potential of Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preclinical Studies: A Systematic Review Using Modified ARRIVE and CONSORT Guidelines.

Ramamoorthi M, Bakkar M, Jordan J, Tran SD - Stem Cells Int (2015)

Flow chart demonstrating the strategy used to identify in vitro and in vivo studies for this systematic review of dental stem cells on bone regeneration (PRISMA guidelines is used to design this search strategy).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4464683&req=5

fig1: Flow chart demonstrating the strategy used to identify in vitro and in vivo studies for this systematic review of dental stem cells on bone regeneration (PRISMA guidelines is used to design this search strategy).
Mentions: A total of 1,914 articles were retrieved from the literature search; 1,480 were excluded because of duplication. Four hundred and thirty-four articles were eligible for title and abstract screening. 227 articles were excluded as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Thus 207 articles were qualified for full-text evaluation. 70 articles were excluded after proofreading the full text. The reasons for exclusion were as follows: odontogenic/dentin/cementum/periodontal ligament regeneration (n = 52), clinical studies (n = 4), reviews (n = 5), language restrictions (n = 7), and multiple reports of the same experiment (n = 2), thus leaving 137 full articles to be included in this systematic qualitative review. The outline of articles selection is summarized in a flow chart (Figure 1). The details of the included studies are described in Table 3.

Bottom Line: Methods.Conclusion.Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate the potential use of dental stem cells in bone regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Craniofacial Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Laboratory, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Background and Objective. Dental stem cell-based tissue engineered constructs are emerging as a promising alternative to autologous bone transfer for treating bone defects. The purpose of this review is to systematically assess the preclinical in vivo and in vitro studies which have evaluated the efficacy of dental stem cells on bone regeneration. Methods. A literature search was conducted in Ovid Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science up to October 2014. Implantation of dental stem cells in animal models for evaluating bone regeneration and/or in vitro studies demonstrating osteogenic potential of dental stem cells were included. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used to ensure the quality of the search. Modified ARRIVE (Animal research: reporting in invivo experiments) and CONSORT (Consolidated reporting of trials) were used to critically analyze the selected studies. Results. From 1914 citations, 207 full-text articles were screened and 137 studies were included in this review. Because of the heterogeneity observed in the studies selected, meta-analysis was not possible. Conclusion. Both in vivo and in vitro studies indicate the potential use of dental stem cells in bone regeneration. However well-designed randomized animal trials are needed before moving into clinical trials.

No MeSH data available.