Limits...
Modeling the CO2-effects of forest management and wood usage on a regional basis.

Knauf M, Köhl M, Mues V, Olschofsky K, Frühwald A - Carbon Balance Manag (2015)

Bottom Line: Any additional CO2-effects related to wood usage are not considered by this modification.CO2-emission reductions through both fuel and material substitution as well as CO2 sink in wood products need to be considered.The short-term evaluation of subsystems can be misleading, rendering long-term evaluations (until 2100, or even longer) more effective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Knauf Consulting, Dorotheenstrasse 7, Bielefeld, D-33615 Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: At the 15(th) Conference of Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, Copenhagen, 2009, harvested wood products were identified as an additional carbon pool. This modification eliminates inconsistencies in greenhouse gas reporting by recognizing the role of the forest and timber sector in the global carbon cycle. Any additional CO2-effects related to wood usage are not considered by this modification. This results in a downward bias when the contribution of the forest and timber sector to climate change mitigation is assessed. The following article analyses the overall contribution to climate protection made by the forest management and wood utilization through CO2-emissions reduction using an example from the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Based on long term study periods (2011 to 2050 and 2100, respectively). Various alternative scenarios for forest management and wood usage are presented.

Results: In the mid- to long-term (2050 and 2100, respectively) the net climate protection function of scenarios with varying levels of wood usage is higher than in scenarios without any wood usage. This is not observed for all scenarios on short and mid term evaluations. The advantages of wood usage are evident although the simulations resulted in high values for forest storage in the C pools. Even the carbon sink effect due to temporal accumulation of deadwood during the period from 2011 to 2100 is outbalanced by the potential of wood usage effects.

Conclusions: A full assessment of the CO2-effects of the forest management requires an assessment of the forest supplemented with an assessment of the effects of wood usage. CO2-emission reductions through both fuel and material substitution as well as CO2 sink in wood products need to be considered. An integrated assessment of the climate protection function based on the analysis of the study's scenarios provides decision parameters for a strategic approach to climate protection with regard to forest management and wood use at regional and national levels. The short-term evaluation of subsystems can be misleading, rendering long-term evaluations (until 2100, or even longer) more effective. This is also consistent with the inherently long-term perspective of forest management decisions and measures.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in carbon stock levels of aboveground biomass, belowground biomass, and deadwood in the forest from 2011 to 2100 for the basic scenario value strategy
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Fig2: Changes in carbon stock levels of aboveground biomass, belowground biomass, and deadwood in the forest from 2011 to 2100 for the basic scenario value strategy

Mentions: Figures 2 and 3 show carbon pool changes for the two basic scenarios of value strategy and carbon storage strategy comprised of the C-pools formed by aboveground biomass, belowground biomass and deadwood. Carbon storage in deadwood increases throughout the 90 year study period whereas C-pools in aboveground and belowground biomass decrease after reaching maximum levels in the middle of the period.Fig. 2


Modeling the CO2-effects of forest management and wood usage on a regional basis.

Knauf M, Köhl M, Mues V, Olschofsky K, Frühwald A - Carbon Balance Manag (2015)

Changes in carbon stock levels of aboveground biomass, belowground biomass, and deadwood in the forest from 2011 to 2100 for the basic scenario value strategy
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4464641&req=5

Fig2: Changes in carbon stock levels of aboveground biomass, belowground biomass, and deadwood in the forest from 2011 to 2100 for the basic scenario value strategy
Mentions: Figures 2 and 3 show carbon pool changes for the two basic scenarios of value strategy and carbon storage strategy comprised of the C-pools formed by aboveground biomass, belowground biomass and deadwood. Carbon storage in deadwood increases throughout the 90 year study period whereas C-pools in aboveground and belowground biomass decrease after reaching maximum levels in the middle of the period.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Any additional CO2-effects related to wood usage are not considered by this modification.CO2-emission reductions through both fuel and material substitution as well as CO2 sink in wood products need to be considered.The short-term evaluation of subsystems can be misleading, rendering long-term evaluations (until 2100, or even longer) more effective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Knauf Consulting, Dorotheenstrasse 7, Bielefeld, D-33615 Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: At the 15(th) Conference of Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, Copenhagen, 2009, harvested wood products were identified as an additional carbon pool. This modification eliminates inconsistencies in greenhouse gas reporting by recognizing the role of the forest and timber sector in the global carbon cycle. Any additional CO2-effects related to wood usage are not considered by this modification. This results in a downward bias when the contribution of the forest and timber sector to climate change mitigation is assessed. The following article analyses the overall contribution to climate protection made by the forest management and wood utilization through CO2-emissions reduction using an example from the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Based on long term study periods (2011 to 2050 and 2100, respectively). Various alternative scenarios for forest management and wood usage are presented.

Results: In the mid- to long-term (2050 and 2100, respectively) the net climate protection function of scenarios with varying levels of wood usage is higher than in scenarios without any wood usage. This is not observed for all scenarios on short and mid term evaluations. The advantages of wood usage are evident although the simulations resulted in high values for forest storage in the C pools. Even the carbon sink effect due to temporal accumulation of deadwood during the period from 2011 to 2100 is outbalanced by the potential of wood usage effects.

Conclusions: A full assessment of the CO2-effects of the forest management requires an assessment of the forest supplemented with an assessment of the effects of wood usage. CO2-emission reductions through both fuel and material substitution as well as CO2 sink in wood products need to be considered. An integrated assessment of the climate protection function based on the analysis of the study's scenarios provides decision parameters for a strategic approach to climate protection with regard to forest management and wood use at regional and national levels. The short-term evaluation of subsystems can be misleading, rendering long-term evaluations (until 2100, or even longer) more effective. This is also consistent with the inherently long-term perspective of forest management decisions and measures.

No MeSH data available.