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Atrophic gastritis: Helicobacter pylori versus duodenogastric reflux.

Slăvescu KC, Mărgescu C, Pîrvan A, Şarban C, Gheban D, Miu N - Clujul Med (2013)

Bottom Line: According to the Sydney System, the degree of atrophy was found to be mild in 3 patients, moderate in 25, and severe in 13 patients; 14 cases were associated with duodenogastric reflux, 5 with Helicobacter pylori and 2 with Helicobacter heilmannii infection, but in 17 cases the etiology was unknown.Atrophic gastritis is present in childhood, even at very young ages (infants, toddlers).The degree of the atrophy is not correlated with the age of the children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of this study was to asses the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in children. We also wanted to compare the clinical manifestation, endoscopic appearance and the degree of the gastric atrophy in children and to identify the possible causes which determine gastric atrophy.

Methods: We evaluated 247 children with chronic gastritis (153 female/94 male, mean age 12.32 years). Atrophy was defined as the loss of normal glandular components, including replacement with fibrosis and/or intestinal metaplasia.

Results: The prevalence of the atrophic gastritis was 16.6% (41 cases), mean age 11.59+/-1.75 years, male-to-female ratio 16:25. The clinical manifestations were correlated with the patient age (infants and toddlers were evaluated mostly for weight loss - 4 cases, and older children for abdominal pain - 22 cases). The endoscopic appearance was described as either nodular (15 cases), or erythematous gastritis (10 cases), or normal (10 cases). According to the Sydney System, the degree of atrophy was found to be mild in 3 patients, moderate in 25, and severe in 13 patients; 14 cases were associated with duodenogastric reflux, 5 with Helicobacter pylori and 2 with Helicobacter heilmannii infection, but in 17 cases the etiology was unknown.

Conclusions: Atrophic gastritis is present in childhood, even at very young ages (infants, toddlers). The endoscopic appearance is not characteristic for the presence of atrophy. The degree of the atrophy is not correlated with the age of the children. Because of the relatively high number of duodenogastric reflux associated with gastric atrophy, further studies need to evaluate the potential causes and clinical course.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparation of the clinical symptoms of children with H. pylori infection and bile reflux.
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f1-cm-86-138: Comparation of the clinical symptoms of children with H. pylori infection and bile reflux.

Mentions: Twenty patients (all of them were school age children and adolescents, 15 girls) were evaluated because of epigastric pain, other 2 because of diffuse abdominal pain, and 7 children (5 girls) with failure to thrive and weight loss (4 patients younger than 3 years). Two children were investigated because of anorexia, two because of vomiting, and 4 patients with autoimmune diseases (one Crohn disease, two other forms of IBD, one celiac disease). Four children were previously known with gastritis (2 girls of 4 and 17 years with chronic reactive gastritis, an 11-year-old boy with H. pylori gastritis, and a 15-year-old girl with antral gastritis). Most of the patients with atrophic gastritis of known etiology were investigated because of abdominal pain: 64% of patients with atrophic gastritis due to biliary reflux, and 80% of those infected with H. pylori (Figure 1).


Atrophic gastritis: Helicobacter pylori versus duodenogastric reflux.

Slăvescu KC, Mărgescu C, Pîrvan A, Şarban C, Gheban D, Miu N - Clujul Med (2013)

Comparation of the clinical symptoms of children with H. pylori infection and bile reflux.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4462443&req=5

f1-cm-86-138: Comparation of the clinical symptoms of children with H. pylori infection and bile reflux.
Mentions: Twenty patients (all of them were school age children and adolescents, 15 girls) were evaluated because of epigastric pain, other 2 because of diffuse abdominal pain, and 7 children (5 girls) with failure to thrive and weight loss (4 patients younger than 3 years). Two children were investigated because of anorexia, two because of vomiting, and 4 patients with autoimmune diseases (one Crohn disease, two other forms of IBD, one celiac disease). Four children were previously known with gastritis (2 girls of 4 and 17 years with chronic reactive gastritis, an 11-year-old boy with H. pylori gastritis, and a 15-year-old girl with antral gastritis). Most of the patients with atrophic gastritis of known etiology were investigated because of abdominal pain: 64% of patients with atrophic gastritis due to biliary reflux, and 80% of those infected with H. pylori (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: According to the Sydney System, the degree of atrophy was found to be mild in 3 patients, moderate in 25, and severe in 13 patients; 14 cases were associated with duodenogastric reflux, 5 with Helicobacter pylori and 2 with Helicobacter heilmannii infection, but in 17 cases the etiology was unknown.Atrophic gastritis is present in childhood, even at very young ages (infants, toddlers).The degree of the atrophy is not correlated with the age of the children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of this study was to asses the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in children. We also wanted to compare the clinical manifestation, endoscopic appearance and the degree of the gastric atrophy in children and to identify the possible causes which determine gastric atrophy.

Methods: We evaluated 247 children with chronic gastritis (153 female/94 male, mean age 12.32 years). Atrophy was defined as the loss of normal glandular components, including replacement with fibrosis and/or intestinal metaplasia.

Results: The prevalence of the atrophic gastritis was 16.6% (41 cases), mean age 11.59+/-1.75 years, male-to-female ratio 16:25. The clinical manifestations were correlated with the patient age (infants and toddlers were evaluated mostly for weight loss - 4 cases, and older children for abdominal pain - 22 cases). The endoscopic appearance was described as either nodular (15 cases), or erythematous gastritis (10 cases), or normal (10 cases). According to the Sydney System, the degree of atrophy was found to be mild in 3 patients, moderate in 25, and severe in 13 patients; 14 cases were associated with duodenogastric reflux, 5 with Helicobacter pylori and 2 with Helicobacter heilmannii infection, but in 17 cases the etiology was unknown.

Conclusions: Atrophic gastritis is present in childhood, even at very young ages (infants, toddlers). The endoscopic appearance is not characteristic for the presence of atrophy. The degree of the atrophy is not correlated with the age of the children. Because of the relatively high number of duodenogastric reflux associated with gastric atrophy, further studies need to evaluate the potential causes and clinical course.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus