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On the history of plasma treatment and comparison of microbiostatic efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device with two modern devices.

Napp J, Daeschlein G, Napp M, von Podewils S, Gümbel D, Spitzmueller R, Fornaciari P, Hinz P, Jünger M - GMS Hyg Infect Control (2015)

Bottom Line: The obtained inhibition areas (IA) were compared.The "historical" cold VW plasma showed antimicrobial effects similar to those of modern APPJ and DBD regarding the diameter of the IA.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, University Medicine, Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) with its many bioactive properties has defined a new medical field: the plasma medicine. However, in the related form of high-frequency therapy, CAP was even used briefly a century ago. The aim of this study was to review historic CAP treatments and to obtain data regarding the antimicrobial efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device.

Methods: First, historic literature regarding the history of CAP treatment was evaluated, because in the modern literature no data were available. Second, the susceptibility of 5 different bacterial wound isolates, cultured on agar, to a historic plasma source (violet wand [VW]) and two modern devices (atmospheric pressure plasma jet [APPJ] and Dielectric Barrier Discharge [DBD]) was analyzed . The obtained inhibition areas (IA) were compared.

Results: First, the most convenient popular historical electromedical treatments produced a so-called effluvia by using glass electrodes, related to today's CAP. Second, all three tested plasma sources showed complete eradication of all tested microbial strains in the treated area. The "historical" cold VW plasma showed antimicrobial effects similar to those of modern APPJ and DBD regarding the diameter of the IA.

Conclusion: Some retrograde evidence may be deducted from this, especially for treatment of infectious diseases with historical plasma devices. The underlying technology may serve as model for construction of modern sucessive devices.

No MeSH data available.


Electrical circuit and diagram of high-frequency treatment (skin touched by plasma spark filaments) (from: Holzer W. Physikalische Medizin in Diagnostik und Therapie. 5. und 6. erw. Aufl. Wien: Maudrich; 1947, XIV)
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Figure 2: Electrical circuit and diagram of high-frequency treatment (skin touched by plasma spark filaments) (from: Holzer W. Physikalische Medizin in Diagnostik und Therapie. 5. und 6. erw. Aufl. Wien: Maudrich; 1947, XIV)

Mentions: Electromedicine was a common medical practice in the early decades of the 20th century and efficacy was claimed for a wide spectrum of diseases. Arsonvalization (Figure 2 (Fig. 2)) was one of the most convenient popular electromedical treatments, classified as high-frequency therapy, and had a lot in common with modern CAP treatment, at least in terms of bioactive properties. This historical device produced a so-called effluvia by using glass electrodes, related to today’s CAP using glass electrodes. While in the first applications, pure field effects were induced from a distance, the technical development of later therapeutic devices allowed direct body and skin contact with plasma discharges.


On the history of plasma treatment and comparison of microbiostatic efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device with two modern devices.

Napp J, Daeschlein G, Napp M, von Podewils S, Gümbel D, Spitzmueller R, Fornaciari P, Hinz P, Jünger M - GMS Hyg Infect Control (2015)

Electrical circuit and diagram of high-frequency treatment (skin touched by plasma spark filaments) (from: Holzer W. Physikalische Medizin in Diagnostik und Therapie. 5. und 6. erw. Aufl. Wien: Maudrich; 1947, XIV)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4459170&req=5

Figure 2: Electrical circuit and diagram of high-frequency treatment (skin touched by plasma spark filaments) (from: Holzer W. Physikalische Medizin in Diagnostik und Therapie. 5. und 6. erw. Aufl. Wien: Maudrich; 1947, XIV)
Mentions: Electromedicine was a common medical practice in the early decades of the 20th century and efficacy was claimed for a wide spectrum of diseases. Arsonvalization (Figure 2 (Fig. 2)) was one of the most convenient popular electromedical treatments, classified as high-frequency therapy, and had a lot in common with modern CAP treatment, at least in terms of bioactive properties. This historical device produced a so-called effluvia by using glass electrodes, related to today’s CAP using glass electrodes. While in the first applications, pure field effects were induced from a distance, the technical development of later therapeutic devices allowed direct body and skin contact with plasma discharges.

Bottom Line: The obtained inhibition areas (IA) were compared.The "historical" cold VW plasma showed antimicrobial effects similar to those of modern APPJ and DBD regarding the diameter of the IA.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, University Medicine, Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) with its many bioactive properties has defined a new medical field: the plasma medicine. However, in the related form of high-frequency therapy, CAP was even used briefly a century ago. The aim of this study was to review historic CAP treatments and to obtain data regarding the antimicrobial efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device.

Methods: First, historic literature regarding the history of CAP treatment was evaluated, because in the modern literature no data were available. Second, the susceptibility of 5 different bacterial wound isolates, cultured on agar, to a historic plasma source (violet wand [VW]) and two modern devices (atmospheric pressure plasma jet [APPJ] and Dielectric Barrier Discharge [DBD]) was analyzed . The obtained inhibition areas (IA) were compared.

Results: First, the most convenient popular historical electromedical treatments produced a so-called effluvia by using glass electrodes, related to today's CAP. Second, all three tested plasma sources showed complete eradication of all tested microbial strains in the treated area. The "historical" cold VW plasma showed antimicrobial effects similar to those of modern APPJ and DBD regarding the diameter of the IA.

Conclusion: Some retrograde evidence may be deducted from this, especially for treatment of infectious diseases with historical plasma devices. The underlying technology may serve as model for construction of modern sucessive devices.

No MeSH data available.