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Social autopsy study identifies determinants of neonatal mortality in Doume, Nguelemendouka and Abong-Mbang health districts, Eastern Region of Cameroon.

Koffi AK, Libite PR, Moluh S, Wounang R, Kalter HD - J Glob Health (2015)

Bottom Line: More than half of the deaths (57%) occurred at home.Of the 64 neonates born at a health facility, about 63% died in the health facility without leaving.Careseeking was delayed for several neonates who became sick after the first week of life and whose illnesses were less serious at the onset until they became more severely ill.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Reducing preventable medical causes of neonatal death for faster progress toward the MGD4 will require Cameroon to adequately address the social factors contributing to these deaths. The objective of this paper is to explore the social, behavioral and health systems determinants of newborn death in Doume, Nguelemendouka and Abong-Mbang health districts, in Eastern Region of Cameroon, from 2007-2010.

Methods: Data come from the 2012 Verbal/Social Autopsy (VASA) study, which aimed to determine the biological causes and social, behavioral and health systems determinants of under-five deaths in Doume, Nguelemendouka and Abong-Mbang health districts in Eastern Region of Cameroon. The analysis of the data was guided by the review of the coverage of key interventions along the continuum of normal maternal and newborn care and by the description of breakdowns in the care provided for severe neonatal illnesses within the Pathway to Survival conceptual framework.

Results: One hundred sixty-four newborn deaths were confirmed from the VASA survey. The majority of the deceased newborns were living in households with poor socio-economic conditions. Most (60-80%) neonates were born to mothers who had one or more pregnancy or labor and delivery complications. Only 23% of the deceased newborns benefited from hygienic cord care after birth. Half received appropriate thermal care and only 6% were breastfed within one hour after birth. Sixty percent of the deaths occurred during the first day of life. Fifty-five percent of the babies were born at home. More than half of the deaths (57%) occurred at home. Of the 64 neonates born at a health facility, about 63% died in the health facility without leaving. Careseeking was delayed for several neonates who became sick after the first week of life and whose illnesses were less serious at the onset until they became more severely ill. Cost, including for transport, health care and other expenses, emerged as main barriers to formal care-seeking both for the mothers and their newborns.

Conclusions: This study presents an opportunity to strengthen maternal and newborn health by increasing the coverage of essential and low cost interventions that could have saved the lives of many newborns in eastern Cameroon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The “Pathway to Survival” for 123 neonatal deaths (born at home or left the delivery facility alive). §Illness severity at onset; §§Illness severity at onset and when caregiver decided to seek formal care; N/M – normal/mild, Mod – moderate, Svr – severe; *CHW – Community Health Worker, **NGO – Non-governmental organization.
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Figure 4: The “Pathway to Survival” for 123 neonatal deaths (born at home or left the delivery facility alive). §Illness severity at onset; §§Illness severity at onset and when caregiver decided to seek formal care; N/M – normal/mild, Mod – moderate, Svr – severe; *CHW – Community Health Worker, **NGO – Non-governmental organization.

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the study findings based on the Pathway to Survival model for 123 newborns with an opportunity for careseeking, including those who were born at home or were born in a health facility and left the facility alive. Forty (24%) of the 164 neonates included in the study sample died at the facility where they were delivered, and one was born at home but was missing all information of careseeking.


Social autopsy study identifies determinants of neonatal mortality in Doume, Nguelemendouka and Abong-Mbang health districts, Eastern Region of Cameroon.

Koffi AK, Libite PR, Moluh S, Wounang R, Kalter HD - J Glob Health (2015)

The “Pathway to Survival” for 123 neonatal deaths (born at home or left the delivery facility alive). §Illness severity at onset; §§Illness severity at onset and when caregiver decided to seek formal care; N/M – normal/mild, Mod – moderate, Svr – severe; *CHW – Community Health Worker, **NGO – Non-governmental organization.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4459092&req=5

Figure 4: The “Pathway to Survival” for 123 neonatal deaths (born at home or left the delivery facility alive). §Illness severity at onset; §§Illness severity at onset and when caregiver decided to seek formal care; N/M – normal/mild, Mod – moderate, Svr – severe; *CHW – Community Health Worker, **NGO – Non-governmental organization.
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the study findings based on the Pathway to Survival model for 123 newborns with an opportunity for careseeking, including those who were born at home or were born in a health facility and left the facility alive. Forty (24%) of the 164 neonates included in the study sample died at the facility where they were delivered, and one was born at home but was missing all information of careseeking.

Bottom Line: More than half of the deaths (57%) occurred at home.Of the 64 neonates born at a health facility, about 63% died in the health facility without leaving.Careseeking was delayed for several neonates who became sick after the first week of life and whose illnesses were less serious at the onset until they became more severely ill.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Reducing preventable medical causes of neonatal death for faster progress toward the MGD4 will require Cameroon to adequately address the social factors contributing to these deaths. The objective of this paper is to explore the social, behavioral and health systems determinants of newborn death in Doume, Nguelemendouka and Abong-Mbang health districts, in Eastern Region of Cameroon, from 2007-2010.

Methods: Data come from the 2012 Verbal/Social Autopsy (VASA) study, which aimed to determine the biological causes and social, behavioral and health systems determinants of under-five deaths in Doume, Nguelemendouka and Abong-Mbang health districts in Eastern Region of Cameroon. The analysis of the data was guided by the review of the coverage of key interventions along the continuum of normal maternal and newborn care and by the description of breakdowns in the care provided for severe neonatal illnesses within the Pathway to Survival conceptual framework.

Results: One hundred sixty-four newborn deaths were confirmed from the VASA survey. The majority of the deceased newborns were living in households with poor socio-economic conditions. Most (60-80%) neonates were born to mothers who had one or more pregnancy or labor and delivery complications. Only 23% of the deceased newborns benefited from hygienic cord care after birth. Half received appropriate thermal care and only 6% were breastfed within one hour after birth. Sixty percent of the deaths occurred during the first day of life. Fifty-five percent of the babies were born at home. More than half of the deaths (57%) occurred at home. Of the 64 neonates born at a health facility, about 63% died in the health facility without leaving. Careseeking was delayed for several neonates who became sick after the first week of life and whose illnesses were less serious at the onset until they became more severely ill. Cost, including for transport, health care and other expenses, emerged as main barriers to formal care-seeking both for the mothers and their newborns.

Conclusions: This study presents an opportunity to strengthen maternal and newborn health by increasing the coverage of essential and low cost interventions that could have saved the lives of many newborns in eastern Cameroon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus