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Optic-flow selective cortical sensory regions associated with self-reported states of vection.

Uesaki M, Ashida H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: It has repeatedly been demonstrated that a cortical network including visual, multisensory, and vestibular areas is implicated in processing optic flow; namely, visual areas middle temporal cortex (MT+), V6; multisensory areas ventral intra-parietal area (VIP), cingulate sulcus visual area, precuneus motion area (PcM); and vestibular areas parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) and putative area 2v (p2v).The results showed that activity in visual areas MT+ and V6, multisensory area VIP and vestibular area PIVC was significantly greater while participants were experiencing vection, as compared to when they were experiencing no vection, which may indicate that activation in MT+, V6, VIP, and PIVC reflects vection.The results also place VIP in a good position to integrate visual cues related to self-motion and vestibular information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, Kyoto Japan ; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo Japan.

ABSTRACT
Optic flow is one of the most important visual cues to the estimation of self-motion. It has repeatedly been demonstrated that a cortical network including visual, multisensory, and vestibular areas is implicated in processing optic flow; namely, visual areas middle temporal cortex (MT+), V6; multisensory areas ventral intra-parietal area (VIP), cingulate sulcus visual area, precuneus motion area (PcM); and vestibular areas parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) and putative area 2v (p2v). However, few studies have investigated the roles of and interaction between the optic-flow selective sensory areas within the context of self-motion perception. When visual information (i.e., optic flow) is the sole cue to computing self-motion parameters, the discrepancy amongst the sensory signals may induce an illusion of self-motion referred to as 'vection.' This study aimed to identify optic-flow selective sensory areas that are involved in the processing of visual cues to self-motion, by introducing vection as an index and assessing activation in which of those areas reflect vection, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that activity in visual areas MT+ and V6, multisensory area VIP and vestibular area PIVC was significantly greater while participants were experiencing vection, as compared to when they were experiencing no vection, which may indicate that activation in MT+, V6, VIP, and PIVC reflects vection. The results also place VIP in a good position to integrate visual cues related to self-motion and vestibular information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

BOLD responses during vection and no-vection events, for MT+, V6, VIP, CSv, PcM, p2v, and PIVC in one representative brain. Time series data for the two types of events and for the two hemispheres are overlaid. A single time series was computed from 10 runs. The time series was then collapsed over a single cycle of 32 s. Error bars indicate SE.
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Figure 5: BOLD responses during vection and no-vection events, for MT+, V6, VIP, CSv, PcM, p2v, and PIVC in one representative brain. Time series data for the two types of events and for the two hemispheres are overlaid. A single time series was computed from 10 runs. The time series was then collapsed over a single cycle of 32 s. Error bars indicate SE.

Mentions: Figure 5 illustrates the percent signal changes during the vection and the no-vection events in one of the participants. A paired two-sample t-test (two-tailed) was performed for each ROI in each participant to compare activity in each area during the vection events to that during the no-vection events. For both sets of events, an event-related average time series was computed for each of the 10 experimental runs for each ROI, and magnitude of BOLD responses across 10 s from 5 s after the button press was averaged. Consequently, there were 10 data points per type of events per ROI. The results of the t-tests are reported in Table 3.


Optic-flow selective cortical sensory regions associated with self-reported states of vection.

Uesaki M, Ashida H - Front Psychol (2015)

BOLD responses during vection and no-vection events, for MT+, V6, VIP, CSv, PcM, p2v, and PIVC in one representative brain. Time series data for the two types of events and for the two hemispheres are overlaid. A single time series was computed from 10 runs. The time series was then collapsed over a single cycle of 32 s. Error bars indicate SE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4459088&req=5

Figure 5: BOLD responses during vection and no-vection events, for MT+, V6, VIP, CSv, PcM, p2v, and PIVC in one representative brain. Time series data for the two types of events and for the two hemispheres are overlaid. A single time series was computed from 10 runs. The time series was then collapsed over a single cycle of 32 s. Error bars indicate SE.
Mentions: Figure 5 illustrates the percent signal changes during the vection and the no-vection events in one of the participants. A paired two-sample t-test (two-tailed) was performed for each ROI in each participant to compare activity in each area during the vection events to that during the no-vection events. For both sets of events, an event-related average time series was computed for each of the 10 experimental runs for each ROI, and magnitude of BOLD responses across 10 s from 5 s after the button press was averaged. Consequently, there were 10 data points per type of events per ROI. The results of the t-tests are reported in Table 3.

Bottom Line: It has repeatedly been demonstrated that a cortical network including visual, multisensory, and vestibular areas is implicated in processing optic flow; namely, visual areas middle temporal cortex (MT+), V6; multisensory areas ventral intra-parietal area (VIP), cingulate sulcus visual area, precuneus motion area (PcM); and vestibular areas parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) and putative area 2v (p2v).The results showed that activity in visual areas MT+ and V6, multisensory area VIP and vestibular area PIVC was significantly greater while participants were experiencing vection, as compared to when they were experiencing no vection, which may indicate that activation in MT+, V6, VIP, and PIVC reflects vection.The results also place VIP in a good position to integrate visual cues related to self-motion and vestibular information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, Kyoto Japan ; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo Japan.

ABSTRACT
Optic flow is one of the most important visual cues to the estimation of self-motion. It has repeatedly been demonstrated that a cortical network including visual, multisensory, and vestibular areas is implicated in processing optic flow; namely, visual areas middle temporal cortex (MT+), V6; multisensory areas ventral intra-parietal area (VIP), cingulate sulcus visual area, precuneus motion area (PcM); and vestibular areas parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) and putative area 2v (p2v). However, few studies have investigated the roles of and interaction between the optic-flow selective sensory areas within the context of self-motion perception. When visual information (i.e., optic flow) is the sole cue to computing self-motion parameters, the discrepancy amongst the sensory signals may induce an illusion of self-motion referred to as 'vection.' This study aimed to identify optic-flow selective sensory areas that are involved in the processing of visual cues to self-motion, by introducing vection as an index and assessing activation in which of those areas reflect vection, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that activity in visual areas MT+ and V6, multisensory area VIP and vestibular area PIVC was significantly greater while participants were experiencing vection, as compared to when they were experiencing no vection, which may indicate that activation in MT+, V6, VIP, and PIVC reflects vection. The results also place VIP in a good position to integrate visual cues related to self-motion and vestibular information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus