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Inhibitory behavioral control: A stochastic dynamic causal modeling study comparing cocaine dependent subjects and controls.

Ma L, Steinberg JL, Cunningham KA, Lane SD, Bjork JM, Neelakantan H, Price AE, Narayana PA, Kosten TR, Bechara A, Moeller FG - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Bottom Line: The present study employed fMRI-based dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to study the effective (directional) neuronal connectivity associated with response inhibition in CD subjects, elicited under performance of a Go/NoGo task with two levels of NoGo difficulty (Easy and Hard).The effective connectivity from left (L) anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to L caudate was similarly modulated during the Easy NoGo condition for both groups.In CD subjects, the effective connectivity from L ACC to L caudate became more negative during the Hard NoGo conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), Richmond, VA, USA ; Department of Radiology, VCU, Richmond, VA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cocaine dependence is associated with increased impulsivity in humans. Both cocaine dependence and impulsive behavior are under the regulatory control of cortico-striatal networks. One behavioral laboratory measure of impulsivity is response inhibition (ability to withhold a prepotent response) in which altered patterns of regional brain activation during executive tasks in service of normal performance are frequently found in cocaine dependent (CD) subjects studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, little is known about aberrations in specific directional neuronal connectivity in CD subjects. The present study employed fMRI-based dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to study the effective (directional) neuronal connectivity associated with response inhibition in CD subjects, elicited under performance of a Go/NoGo task with two levels of NoGo difficulty (Easy and Hard). The performance on the Go/NoGo task was not significantly different between CD subjects and controls. The DCM analysis revealed that prefrontal-striatal connectivity was modulated (influenced) during the NoGo conditions for both groups. The effective connectivity from left (L) anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to L caudate was similarly modulated during the Easy NoGo condition for both groups. During the Hard NoGo condition in controls, the effective connectivity from right (R) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to L caudate became more positive, and the effective connectivity from R ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) to L caudate became more negative. In CD subjects, the effective connectivity from L ACC to L caudate became more negative during the Hard NoGo conditions. These results indicate that during Hard NoGo trials in CD subjects, the ACC rather than DLPFC or VLPFC influenced caudate during response inhibition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart showing subject inclusion/exclusion, and which project (Project 1 and Project 2) the subjects come from. CTL denotes control subject, and CD denotes cocaine dependent subject.
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f0005: Flow chart showing subject inclusion/exclusion, and which project (Project 1 and Project 2) the subjects come from. CTL denotes control subject, and CD denotes cocaine dependent subject.

Mentions: In addition to the 10 completed control subjects analyzed in this report, seven other control subjects were excluded for the following reasons: taking medications that may affect the central nervous system (one subject); behavioral performance (percentage of correct responses <50%) (two subjects); and unmatched age (younger than 23 years old) (four subjects). In addition to the 13 completed CD subjects, 13 additional CD subjects were excluded for the following reasons: behavioral performance (percentage of correct response <50%) (one subject); excessive head motion during the fMRI scan (two subjects); clinically significant abnormal results on FLAIR scan of the brain (four subjects); subject's request to terminate the scanning (three subjects); and current alcohol dependence (three subjects). See Fig. 1 for the flow chart showing subject inclusion/exclusion.


Inhibitory behavioral control: A stochastic dynamic causal modeling study comparing cocaine dependent subjects and controls.

Ma L, Steinberg JL, Cunningham KA, Lane SD, Bjork JM, Neelakantan H, Price AE, Narayana PA, Kosten TR, Bechara A, Moeller FG - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Flow chart showing subject inclusion/exclusion, and which project (Project 1 and Project 2) the subjects come from. CTL denotes control subject, and CD denotes cocaine dependent subject.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4459041&req=5

f0005: Flow chart showing subject inclusion/exclusion, and which project (Project 1 and Project 2) the subjects come from. CTL denotes control subject, and CD denotes cocaine dependent subject.
Mentions: In addition to the 10 completed control subjects analyzed in this report, seven other control subjects were excluded for the following reasons: taking medications that may affect the central nervous system (one subject); behavioral performance (percentage of correct responses <50%) (two subjects); and unmatched age (younger than 23 years old) (four subjects). In addition to the 13 completed CD subjects, 13 additional CD subjects were excluded for the following reasons: behavioral performance (percentage of correct response <50%) (one subject); excessive head motion during the fMRI scan (two subjects); clinically significant abnormal results on FLAIR scan of the brain (four subjects); subject's request to terminate the scanning (three subjects); and current alcohol dependence (three subjects). See Fig. 1 for the flow chart showing subject inclusion/exclusion.

Bottom Line: The present study employed fMRI-based dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to study the effective (directional) neuronal connectivity associated with response inhibition in CD subjects, elicited under performance of a Go/NoGo task with two levels of NoGo difficulty (Easy and Hard).The effective connectivity from left (L) anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to L caudate was similarly modulated during the Easy NoGo condition for both groups.In CD subjects, the effective connectivity from L ACC to L caudate became more negative during the Hard NoGo conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), Richmond, VA, USA ; Department of Radiology, VCU, Richmond, VA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cocaine dependence is associated with increased impulsivity in humans. Both cocaine dependence and impulsive behavior are under the regulatory control of cortico-striatal networks. One behavioral laboratory measure of impulsivity is response inhibition (ability to withhold a prepotent response) in which altered patterns of regional brain activation during executive tasks in service of normal performance are frequently found in cocaine dependent (CD) subjects studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, little is known about aberrations in specific directional neuronal connectivity in CD subjects. The present study employed fMRI-based dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to study the effective (directional) neuronal connectivity associated with response inhibition in CD subjects, elicited under performance of a Go/NoGo task with two levels of NoGo difficulty (Easy and Hard). The performance on the Go/NoGo task was not significantly different between CD subjects and controls. The DCM analysis revealed that prefrontal-striatal connectivity was modulated (influenced) during the NoGo conditions for both groups. The effective connectivity from left (L) anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to L caudate was similarly modulated during the Easy NoGo condition for both groups. During the Hard NoGo condition in controls, the effective connectivity from right (R) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to L caudate became more positive, and the effective connectivity from R ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) to L caudate became more negative. In CD subjects, the effective connectivity from L ACC to L caudate became more negative during the Hard NoGo conditions. These results indicate that during Hard NoGo trials in CD subjects, the ACC rather than DLPFC or VLPFC influenced caudate during response inhibition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus