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Three ADIPOR1 Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

Ye J, Jiang L, Wu C, Liu A, Mao S, Ge L - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: However, subgroup analysis showed that this association was significant only for Asians in the case of colorectal cancer.No significant associations were found between rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G) and cancer risk, either in analyses of the entire study population or in analyses of subgroups.Large, well-designed studies are needed to verify our findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Oncology, the Cancer Institute, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies have come to conflicting conclusions about whether polymorphisms in the adiponectin receptor 1 gene (ADIPOR1) are associated with cancer risk. To help resolve this question, we meta-analyzed case-control studies in the literature.

Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biological Medical Database and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database were systematically searched to identify all case-control studies published through February 2015 examining any ADIPOR1 polymorphisms and risk of any type of cancer. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.

Results: A total of 13 case-control studies involving 5,750 cases and 6,762 controls were analyzed. Analysis of the entire study population revealed a significant association between rs1342387(G/A) and overall cancer risk using a homozygous model (OR 0.82, 95%CI 0.72 to 0.94), heterozygous model (OR 0.84, 95%CI 0.76 to 0.93), dominant model (OR 0.85, 95%CI 0.75 to 0.97) and allele contrast model (OR 0.88, 95%CI 0.80 to 0.97). However, subgroup analysis showed that this association was significant only for Asians in the case of colorectal cancer. No significant associations were found between rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G) and cancer risk, either in analyses of the entire study population or in analyses of subgroups.

Conclusions: Our meta-analysis suggests that the ADIPOR1 rs1342387(G/A) polymorphism, but not rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G), may be associated with cancer risk, especially risk of colorectal cancer in Asians. Large, well-designed studies are needed to verify our findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of study selection for the meta-analysis.CBM, Chinese Biological Medical Database. CNKI, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database.
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pone.0127253.g001: Flow diagram of study selection for the meta-analysis.CBM, Chinese Biological Medical Database. CNKI, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database.

Mentions: This meta-analysis was conducted according to the recommendations of the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” (PRISMA) statement (S1 Checklist) and “Meta-analysis on Genetic Association Studies” statement (S2 Checklist). Systematic literature searches identified 10 publications [10–17, 22, 23] describing 13 case-control studies (Fig 1). One publication [13] described two case–control studies, and another [23] reported three case–control studies. Of the 13 studies, 10 analyzed the ADIPOR1 SNP rs12733285(C/T) [10–14, 17, 23]; 12 analyzed rs1342387(G/A) [11–17, 22, 23]; and 8 analyzed rs7539542(C/G) [10, 13–17, 22] (Table 1). Genotype distribution in control groups was consistent with HWE in all 13 studies. All but two studies [15, 23] received at least seven stars on the NOS, indicating that they were high-quality (Table 1, S1 Table).


Three ADIPOR1 Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

Ye J, Jiang L, Wu C, Liu A, Mao S, Ge L - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow diagram of study selection for the meta-analysis.CBM, Chinese Biological Medical Database. CNKI, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4457489&req=5

pone.0127253.g001: Flow diagram of study selection for the meta-analysis.CBM, Chinese Biological Medical Database. CNKI, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database.
Mentions: This meta-analysis was conducted according to the recommendations of the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” (PRISMA) statement (S1 Checklist) and “Meta-analysis on Genetic Association Studies” statement (S2 Checklist). Systematic literature searches identified 10 publications [10–17, 22, 23] describing 13 case-control studies (Fig 1). One publication [13] described two case–control studies, and another [23] reported three case–control studies. Of the 13 studies, 10 analyzed the ADIPOR1 SNP rs12733285(C/T) [10–14, 17, 23]; 12 analyzed rs1342387(G/A) [11–17, 22, 23]; and 8 analyzed rs7539542(C/G) [10, 13–17, 22] (Table 1). Genotype distribution in control groups was consistent with HWE in all 13 studies. All but two studies [15, 23] received at least seven stars on the NOS, indicating that they were high-quality (Table 1, S1 Table).

Bottom Line: However, subgroup analysis showed that this association was significant only for Asians in the case of colorectal cancer.No significant associations were found between rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G) and cancer risk, either in analyses of the entire study population or in analyses of subgroups.Large, well-designed studies are needed to verify our findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Oncology, the Cancer Institute, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies have come to conflicting conclusions about whether polymorphisms in the adiponectin receptor 1 gene (ADIPOR1) are associated with cancer risk. To help resolve this question, we meta-analyzed case-control studies in the literature.

Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biological Medical Database and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database were systematically searched to identify all case-control studies published through February 2015 examining any ADIPOR1 polymorphisms and risk of any type of cancer. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.

Results: A total of 13 case-control studies involving 5,750 cases and 6,762 controls were analyzed. Analysis of the entire study population revealed a significant association between rs1342387(G/A) and overall cancer risk using a homozygous model (OR 0.82, 95%CI 0.72 to 0.94), heterozygous model (OR 0.84, 95%CI 0.76 to 0.93), dominant model (OR 0.85, 95%CI 0.75 to 0.97) and allele contrast model (OR 0.88, 95%CI 0.80 to 0.97). However, subgroup analysis showed that this association was significant only for Asians in the case of colorectal cancer. No significant associations were found between rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G) and cancer risk, either in analyses of the entire study population or in analyses of subgroups.

Conclusions: Our meta-analysis suggests that the ADIPOR1 rs1342387(G/A) polymorphism, but not rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G), may be associated with cancer risk, especially risk of colorectal cancer in Asians. Large, well-designed studies are needed to verify our findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus