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A new strategy for controlling invasive weeds: selecting valuable native plants to defeat them.

Li W, Luo J, Tian X, Soon Chow W, Sun Z, Zhang T, Peng S, Peng C - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: To explore replacement control of the invasive weed Ipomoea cairica, we studied the competitive effects of two valuable natives, Pueraria lobata and Paederia scandens, on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of I. cairica, in pot and field experiments.When I. cairica was planted in pots with P. lobata or P. scandens, its total biomass decreased by 68.7% and 45.8%, and its stem length by 33.3% and 34.1%, respectively.The two natives depressed growth of the weed by their strong effects on its photosynthetic characteristics, including suppression of leaf biomass and the abundance of the CO2-fixing enzyme RUBISCO.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology for Plant Development, Key Laboratory of Ecology and Environmental Science in Guangdong Higher Education, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510631 China.

ABSTRACT
To explore replacement control of the invasive weed Ipomoea cairica, we studied the competitive effects of two valuable natives, Pueraria lobata and Paederia scandens, on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of I. cairica, in pot and field experiments. When I. cairica was planted in pots with P. lobata or P. scandens, its total biomass decreased by 68.7% and 45.8%, and its stem length by 33.3% and 34.1%, respectively. The two natives depressed growth of the weed by their strong effects on its photosynthetic characteristics, including suppression of leaf biomass and the abundance of the CO2-fixing enzyme RUBISCO. The field experiment demonstrated that sowing seeds of P. lobata or P. scandens in plots where the weed had been largely cleared produced 11.8-fold or 2.5-fold as much leaf biomass of the two natives, respectively, as the weed. Replacement control by valuable native species is potentially a feasible and sustainable means of suppressing I. cairica.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pictures of the experimental field(a - the whole experiment plots; b – no replacement plots as the control; c – the plots replaced by P. lobata; d – the plots replaced by P. scandens).
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f3: Pictures of the experimental field(a - the whole experiment plots; b – no replacement plots as the control; c – the plots replaced by P. lobata; d – the plots replaced by P. scandens).

Mentions: Five months after sowing seeds of the two native species, the whole experiment plots were pictured in Fig. 3a. There was little recruitment of the invasive weed I. cairica in the plots replaced by the two native species (Fig. 3c,d). By contrast, there was much recruitment of I. cairica in the control plots (Fig. 3b), from which the aboveground biomass of I. cairica and most roots had been cleared five months before.


A new strategy for controlling invasive weeds: selecting valuable native plants to defeat them.

Li W, Luo J, Tian X, Soon Chow W, Sun Z, Zhang T, Peng S, Peng C - Sci Rep (2015)

Pictures of the experimental field(a - the whole experiment plots; b – no replacement plots as the control; c – the plots replaced by P. lobata; d – the plots replaced by P. scandens).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4457149&req=5

f3: Pictures of the experimental field(a - the whole experiment plots; b – no replacement plots as the control; c – the plots replaced by P. lobata; d – the plots replaced by P. scandens).
Mentions: Five months after sowing seeds of the two native species, the whole experiment plots were pictured in Fig. 3a. There was little recruitment of the invasive weed I. cairica in the plots replaced by the two native species (Fig. 3c,d). By contrast, there was much recruitment of I. cairica in the control plots (Fig. 3b), from which the aboveground biomass of I. cairica and most roots had been cleared five months before.

Bottom Line: To explore replacement control of the invasive weed Ipomoea cairica, we studied the competitive effects of two valuable natives, Pueraria lobata and Paederia scandens, on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of I. cairica, in pot and field experiments.When I. cairica was planted in pots with P. lobata or P. scandens, its total biomass decreased by 68.7% and 45.8%, and its stem length by 33.3% and 34.1%, respectively.The two natives depressed growth of the weed by their strong effects on its photosynthetic characteristics, including suppression of leaf biomass and the abundance of the CO2-fixing enzyme RUBISCO.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology for Plant Development, Key Laboratory of Ecology and Environmental Science in Guangdong Higher Education, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510631 China.

ABSTRACT
To explore replacement control of the invasive weed Ipomoea cairica, we studied the competitive effects of two valuable natives, Pueraria lobata and Paederia scandens, on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of I. cairica, in pot and field experiments. When I. cairica was planted in pots with P. lobata or P. scandens, its total biomass decreased by 68.7% and 45.8%, and its stem length by 33.3% and 34.1%, respectively. The two natives depressed growth of the weed by their strong effects on its photosynthetic characteristics, including suppression of leaf biomass and the abundance of the CO2-fixing enzyme RUBISCO. The field experiment demonstrated that sowing seeds of P. lobata or P. scandens in plots where the weed had been largely cleared produced 11.8-fold or 2.5-fold as much leaf biomass of the two natives, respectively, as the weed. Replacement control by valuable native species is potentially a feasible and sustainable means of suppressing I. cairica.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus