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Multisensory attention training for treatment of tinnitus.

Spiegel DP, Linford T, Thompson B, Petoe MA, Kobayashi K, Stinear CM, Searchfield GD - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Eighteen participants with predominantly unilateral chronic tinnitus were randomized between two groups receiving 20 daily sessions of either integration (attempting to reduce salience to tinnitus by binding with multisensory stimuli) or attention diversion (multisensory stimuli opposite side to tinnitus) training.The training resulted in small but statistically significant reductions in Tinnitus Functional Index and Tinnitus Severity Numeric Scale scores and improved attentional abilities.No statistically significant improvements in tinnitus were found between the training groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Section of Audiology, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, 261 Morrin Road, Glenn Innes, Auckland, New Zealand [2] Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand [3] McGill Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Tinnitus is the conscious perception of sound with no physical sound source. Some models of tinnitus pathophysiology suggest that networks associated with attention, memory, distress and multisensory experience are involved in tinnitus perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a multisensory attention training paradigm which used audio, visual, and somatosensory stimulation would reduce tinnitus. Eighteen participants with predominantly unilateral chronic tinnitus were randomized between two groups receiving 20 daily sessions of either integration (attempting to reduce salience to tinnitus by binding with multisensory stimuli) or attention diversion (multisensory stimuli opposite side to tinnitus) training. The training resulted in small but statistically significant reductions in Tinnitus Functional Index and Tinnitus Severity Numeric Scale scores and improved attentional abilities. No statistically significant improvements in tinnitus were found between the training groups. This study demonstrated that a short period of multisensory attention training reduced unilateral tinnitus, but directing attention toward or away from the tinnitus side did not differentiate this effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effect of multisensory training on the TFI.Panel (a) shows mean TFI scores from the initial auditory examination (Baseline), before (Pre), after (Post) and three weeks after (Post 3w) the multisensory training. ** p < 0.01, * = p < 0.05. Error bars represent ± SEM. Panel (b) shows individual’s change in TFI from Pre to Post training. The dashed line represents the proposed level of clinically meaningful change in TFI34.
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f2: The effect of multisensory training on the TFI.Panel (a) shows mean TFI scores from the initial auditory examination (Baseline), before (Pre), after (Post) and three weeks after (Post 3w) the multisensory training. ** p < 0.01, * = p < 0.05. Error bars represent ± SEM. Panel (b) shows individual’s change in TFI from Pre to Post training. The dashed line represents the proposed level of clinically meaningful change in TFI34.

Mentions: The TFI scores suggest that most of the participants benefited from the multisensory training (Fig. 2). After 20 days of treatment, 5/16 (31.3%) participants showed 13 point or greater improvement, 3/16 (18.7%) patients showed an improvement between 10 and 12 TFI points, the remaining 5 participants showed a change of less than 7 points. At the group level, there was an overall decrease in the TFI scores over time (χ22 = 12.343, p = 0.02); the mean reduction post treatment was 9.3 points ± 2.6 SEM (Z = -3.246, p = 0.001). The change in TFI score was approaching a positive correlation with the duration of tinnitus (Spearman’s ρ = 0.434, p = 0.072) but did not correlate with participants’ age (Spearman’s ρ = 0.294, p = 0.236). The TFI scores from the initial audiology examination (Baseline) did not significantly differ from those recorded directly before training (Pre) (Z = -0.939, p = 0.348) indicating that the reported improvements were likely attributable to the period of multisensory training rather than normal fluctuations in tinnitus.


Multisensory attention training for treatment of tinnitus.

Spiegel DP, Linford T, Thompson B, Petoe MA, Kobayashi K, Stinear CM, Searchfield GD - Sci Rep (2015)

The effect of multisensory training on the TFI.Panel (a) shows mean TFI scores from the initial auditory examination (Baseline), before (Pre), after (Post) and three weeks after (Post 3w) the multisensory training. ** p < 0.01, * = p < 0.05. Error bars represent ± SEM. Panel (b) shows individual’s change in TFI from Pre to Post training. The dashed line represents the proposed level of clinically meaningful change in TFI34.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4447068&req=5

f2: The effect of multisensory training on the TFI.Panel (a) shows mean TFI scores from the initial auditory examination (Baseline), before (Pre), after (Post) and three weeks after (Post 3w) the multisensory training. ** p < 0.01, * = p < 0.05. Error bars represent ± SEM. Panel (b) shows individual’s change in TFI from Pre to Post training. The dashed line represents the proposed level of clinically meaningful change in TFI34.
Mentions: The TFI scores suggest that most of the participants benefited from the multisensory training (Fig. 2). After 20 days of treatment, 5/16 (31.3%) participants showed 13 point or greater improvement, 3/16 (18.7%) patients showed an improvement between 10 and 12 TFI points, the remaining 5 participants showed a change of less than 7 points. At the group level, there was an overall decrease in the TFI scores over time (χ22 = 12.343, p = 0.02); the mean reduction post treatment was 9.3 points ± 2.6 SEM (Z = -3.246, p = 0.001). The change in TFI score was approaching a positive correlation with the duration of tinnitus (Spearman’s ρ = 0.434, p = 0.072) but did not correlate with participants’ age (Spearman’s ρ = 0.294, p = 0.236). The TFI scores from the initial audiology examination (Baseline) did not significantly differ from those recorded directly before training (Pre) (Z = -0.939, p = 0.348) indicating that the reported improvements were likely attributable to the period of multisensory training rather than normal fluctuations in tinnitus.

Bottom Line: Eighteen participants with predominantly unilateral chronic tinnitus were randomized between two groups receiving 20 daily sessions of either integration (attempting to reduce salience to tinnitus by binding with multisensory stimuli) or attention diversion (multisensory stimuli opposite side to tinnitus) training.The training resulted in small but statistically significant reductions in Tinnitus Functional Index and Tinnitus Severity Numeric Scale scores and improved attentional abilities.No statistically significant improvements in tinnitus were found between the training groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Section of Audiology, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, 261 Morrin Road, Glenn Innes, Auckland, New Zealand [2] Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand [3] McGill Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Tinnitus is the conscious perception of sound with no physical sound source. Some models of tinnitus pathophysiology suggest that networks associated with attention, memory, distress and multisensory experience are involved in tinnitus perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a multisensory attention training paradigm which used audio, visual, and somatosensory stimulation would reduce tinnitus. Eighteen participants with predominantly unilateral chronic tinnitus were randomized between two groups receiving 20 daily sessions of either integration (attempting to reduce salience to tinnitus by binding with multisensory stimuli) or attention diversion (multisensory stimuli opposite side to tinnitus) training. The training resulted in small but statistically significant reductions in Tinnitus Functional Index and Tinnitus Severity Numeric Scale scores and improved attentional abilities. No statistically significant improvements in tinnitus were found between the training groups. This study demonstrated that a short period of multisensory attention training reduced unilateral tinnitus, but directing attention toward or away from the tinnitus side did not differentiate this effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus