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Global Call to Action to scale-up coverage of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: seminar report.

Agarwal K, Alonso P, Chico RM, Coleman J, Dellicour S, Hill J, Majeres-Lugand M, Mangiaterra V, Menendez C, Mitchell K, Roman E, Sicuri E, Tagbor H, van Eijk AM, Webster J - Malar. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: In 2014, a global 'Call to Action' seminar for the scale-up of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy was held during the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.This report summarizes the presentations and main discussion points from the meeting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program, Jhpiego, Baltimore, USA. Koki.Agarwal@jhpiego.org.

ABSTRACT
In 2014, a global 'Call to Action' seminar for the scale-up of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy was held during the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. This report summarizes the presentations and main discussion points from the meeting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

IPTp coverage in sub-Saharan Africa between 2003 and 2014
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Fig1: IPTp coverage in sub-Saharan Africa between 2003 and 2014

Mentions: Current coverage estimates of IPTp and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) in sub-Saharan Africa were presented by Anna Maria van Eijk (Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK) for the period between 2003 and 2014 based on previously published data [1, 2], highlighting an alarming lack of IPTp scale-up. Although coverage for IPTp increased from less than 5 % in 2003 to above 20 % in 2010, no further progress has been made with average coverage rates that have since stagnated between 22 % and 24 %. Overall, IPTp coverage estimates remain far below global targets set by the RBM Partnership of 80 % by 2010, and 100 % (universal coverage) by 2015. Although six countries (The Gambia, Ghana, Malawi, Sao Tomé and Principe, Senegal and Zambia) reached the original 60 % coverage target for 2005, the combined estimate for all countries with an IPTp policy was 24 % in 2013 (Fig. 1). It is of particular concern that the latest estimates for 2014 indicate that coverage is falling in some countries. Progress for ITN coverage is comparatively better but still unacceptably low at 38 % overall. Production of ‘rolling coverage estimates’ are essential to track overall progress as well as to estimate the uptake and impact of the revised WHO recommendation for IPTp [3]. WHO updated the IPTp policy recommendation in September 2012, increasing the regimen from at least two doses of SP to the provision of a dose of IPTp-SP given at every ANC visit beginning as early as possible in the 2nd trimester throughout pregnancy and at least one month apart, ideally administered as directly observed therapy [3]. Measuring the impact of the policy update will require national household surveys to include data on two, three, and more than three doses of IPTp.Fig. 1


Global Call to Action to scale-up coverage of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: seminar report.

Agarwal K, Alonso P, Chico RM, Coleman J, Dellicour S, Hill J, Majeres-Lugand M, Mangiaterra V, Menendez C, Mitchell K, Roman E, Sicuri E, Tagbor H, van Eijk AM, Webster J - Malar. J. (2015)

IPTp coverage in sub-Saharan Africa between 2003 and 2014
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446906&req=5

Fig1: IPTp coverage in sub-Saharan Africa between 2003 and 2014
Mentions: Current coverage estimates of IPTp and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) in sub-Saharan Africa were presented by Anna Maria van Eijk (Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK) for the period between 2003 and 2014 based on previously published data [1, 2], highlighting an alarming lack of IPTp scale-up. Although coverage for IPTp increased from less than 5 % in 2003 to above 20 % in 2010, no further progress has been made with average coverage rates that have since stagnated between 22 % and 24 %. Overall, IPTp coverage estimates remain far below global targets set by the RBM Partnership of 80 % by 2010, and 100 % (universal coverage) by 2015. Although six countries (The Gambia, Ghana, Malawi, Sao Tomé and Principe, Senegal and Zambia) reached the original 60 % coverage target for 2005, the combined estimate for all countries with an IPTp policy was 24 % in 2013 (Fig. 1). It is of particular concern that the latest estimates for 2014 indicate that coverage is falling in some countries. Progress for ITN coverage is comparatively better but still unacceptably low at 38 % overall. Production of ‘rolling coverage estimates’ are essential to track overall progress as well as to estimate the uptake and impact of the revised WHO recommendation for IPTp [3]. WHO updated the IPTp policy recommendation in September 2012, increasing the regimen from at least two doses of SP to the provision of a dose of IPTp-SP given at every ANC visit beginning as early as possible in the 2nd trimester throughout pregnancy and at least one month apart, ideally administered as directly observed therapy [3]. Measuring the impact of the policy update will require national household surveys to include data on two, three, and more than three doses of IPTp.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In 2014, a global 'Call to Action' seminar for the scale-up of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy was held during the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.This report summarizes the presentations and main discussion points from the meeting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program, Jhpiego, Baltimore, USA. Koki.Agarwal@jhpiego.org.

ABSTRACT
In 2014, a global 'Call to Action' seminar for the scale-up of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy was held during the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. This report summarizes the presentations and main discussion points from the meeting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus