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Fabrication and cytocompatibility of in situ crosslinked carbon nanomaterial films.

Patel SC, Lalwani G, Grover K, Qin YX, Sitharaman B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility.Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings.The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5281, USA.

ABSTRACT
Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into two-dimensional (2D) coatings and films that harness their unique physiochemical properties may lead to high impact energy capture/storage, sensors, and biomedical applications. For potential biomedical applications, the suitability of current techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, spray and dip coating, and vacuum filtration, employed to fabricate macroscopic 2D all carbon coatings or films still requires thorough examination. Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility. Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings. The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells. The results lay groundwork for 3D layer-on-layer nanomaterial assemblies (including various forms of graphene) and also opens avenues to further explore the potential of MWCNT films as a novel class of nano-fibrous mats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Representative confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of ADSCs for actin (λex = 488 nm, λem = 550 nm) and proliferation marker Ki-67 (λex = 543 nm, λem = 560 nm). Images taken for ADSCs grown for 5 days on glass coverslips at 10x (A) and 20x (B) magnification and MWCNT crosslinked substrates at 10x (C) and 20x magnification (D).
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f6: Representative confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of ADSCs for actin (λex = 488 nm, λem = 550 nm) and proliferation marker Ki-67 (λex = 543 nm, λem = 560 nm). Images taken for ADSCs grown for 5 days on glass coverslips at 10x (A) and 20x (B) magnification and MWCNT crosslinked substrates at 10x (C) and 20x magnification (D).

Mentions: Immunochemistry studies were conducted to investigate whether cell division was arrested in cells seeded on the MWCNT substrates. In these experiments, ADSCs grown on coverslips and MWCNT films for five days were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies for cellular proliferation marker protein, Ki-67, and probed for fluorescence (Fig. 6, center column). Ki-67 protein is present in all phases of cell growth, and can therefore be employed to evaluate whether the ADSCs are still dividing while cells that enter a G0 resting phase would not express Ki-67 protein49. Additionally, cells were stained for β-actin (Fig. 6, left column) to identify the cytoskeleton of the ADSCs. The merged images of Ki-67 and β-actin (Fig. 6, right column) show the presence of Ki-67 throughout the cell cytoplasm and nucleus for cells seeded on glass coverslips (Fig. 6A,B) or MWCNT (Fig. 6C,D) substrates implying that the cells were proliferating and metabolically active. Actin staining, also showed a more elongated cellular morphology on the MWCNT substrates (Fig. 6D) compared to the control coverslips (Fig. 6B).


Fabrication and cytocompatibility of in situ crosslinked carbon nanomaterial films.

Patel SC, Lalwani G, Grover K, Qin YX, Sitharaman B - Sci Rep (2015)

Representative confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of ADSCs for actin (λex = 488 nm, λem = 550 nm) and proliferation marker Ki-67 (λex = 543 nm, λem = 560 nm). Images taken for ADSCs grown for 5 days on glass coverslips at 10x (A) and 20x (B) magnification and MWCNT crosslinked substrates at 10x (C) and 20x magnification (D).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446896&req=5

f6: Representative confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of ADSCs for actin (λex = 488 nm, λem = 550 nm) and proliferation marker Ki-67 (λex = 543 nm, λem = 560 nm). Images taken for ADSCs grown for 5 days on glass coverslips at 10x (A) and 20x (B) magnification and MWCNT crosslinked substrates at 10x (C) and 20x magnification (D).
Mentions: Immunochemistry studies were conducted to investigate whether cell division was arrested in cells seeded on the MWCNT substrates. In these experiments, ADSCs grown on coverslips and MWCNT films for five days were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies for cellular proliferation marker protein, Ki-67, and probed for fluorescence (Fig. 6, center column). Ki-67 protein is present in all phases of cell growth, and can therefore be employed to evaluate whether the ADSCs are still dividing while cells that enter a G0 resting phase would not express Ki-67 protein49. Additionally, cells were stained for β-actin (Fig. 6, left column) to identify the cytoskeleton of the ADSCs. The merged images of Ki-67 and β-actin (Fig. 6, right column) show the presence of Ki-67 throughout the cell cytoplasm and nucleus for cells seeded on glass coverslips (Fig. 6A,B) or MWCNT (Fig. 6C,D) substrates implying that the cells were proliferating and metabolically active. Actin staining, also showed a more elongated cellular morphology on the MWCNT substrates (Fig. 6D) compared to the control coverslips (Fig. 6B).

Bottom Line: Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility.Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings.The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5281, USA.

ABSTRACT
Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into two-dimensional (2D) coatings and films that harness their unique physiochemical properties may lead to high impact energy capture/storage, sensors, and biomedical applications. For potential biomedical applications, the suitability of current techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, spray and dip coating, and vacuum filtration, employed to fabricate macroscopic 2D all carbon coatings or films still requires thorough examination. Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility. Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings. The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells. The results lay groundwork for 3D layer-on-layer nanomaterial assemblies (including various forms of graphene) and also opens avenues to further explore the potential of MWCNT films as a novel class of nano-fibrous mats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

No MeSH data available.