Limits...
Variation in fatty acid composition of the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected in coral reef habitats of the Malaysian South China Sea.

Arai T, Amalina R, Bachok Z - J Biol Res (Thessalon) (2015)

Bottom Line: In order to understand trophic ecology, habitat use and migration of coral reef fish, fatty acid composition and levels were examined in the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected in the Malaysian South China Sea.Proportions of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) ranged from 55.0% to 66.5%, with the highest proportions in fatty acids, the second highest was monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) ranged from 30.7% to 40.2% while the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was the lowest ranged from 2.8% to 4.8%.Palmitic acid (16:0) was the most common in SAFA, oleic acid (C18:1ω9c) was the dominant in MUFA and linolenic acid (C18:3n3) showed the highest value in PUFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Oceanography and Environment, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu Terengganu, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Background: In order to understand trophic ecology, habitat use and migration of coral reef fish, fatty acid composition and levels were examined in the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected in the Malaysian South China Sea.

Results: Proportions of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) ranged from 55.0% to 66.5%, with the highest proportions in fatty acids, the second highest was monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) ranged from 30.7% to 40.2% while the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was the lowest ranged from 2.8% to 4.8%. Palmitic acid (16:0) was the most common in SAFA, oleic acid (C18:1ω9c) was the dominant in MUFA and linolenic acid (C18:3n3) showed the highest value in PUFA. Fatty acid concentrations, especially in SAFA and MUFA, increased with fish growth, suggesting diet and habitat shifts during the fish life history. Most of the fish had more than 1 of EPA: DHA ratio, which suggested that diets of L. lutjanus tended to be higher trophic organisms such as zooplankton and crustacean in coral ecosystem.

Conclusions: The diet shift revealed by the composition and levels of the fatty acid profile revealed potential pattern in the habitat use and migration scale in coral reef environment of L. lutjanus.

No MeSH data available.


Relationship between each fatty acid level and BW in the livers of the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected at the Bidong Island in Malaysian South China Sea.
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Fig3: Relationship between each fatty acid level and BW in the livers of the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected at the Bidong Island in Malaysian South China Sea.

Mentions: Fatty acid concentrations increased with fish size (Figures 1, 2 and 3), although correlation coefficients were not “strong” for all relationships. Close positive relationships were found between ∑FA, ∑SAFA and ∑MUFA and TL and BW (p < 0.05-0.0001), however no close relationship was found between ∑PUFA and TL and BW (p > 0.05) (Figure 1).Figure 1


Variation in fatty acid composition of the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected in coral reef habitats of the Malaysian South China Sea.

Arai T, Amalina R, Bachok Z - J Biol Res (Thessalon) (2015)

Relationship between each fatty acid level and BW in the livers of the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected at the Bidong Island in Malaysian South China Sea.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446852&req=5

Fig3: Relationship between each fatty acid level and BW in the livers of the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected at the Bidong Island in Malaysian South China Sea.
Mentions: Fatty acid concentrations increased with fish size (Figures 1, 2 and 3), although correlation coefficients were not “strong” for all relationships. Close positive relationships were found between ∑FA, ∑SAFA and ∑MUFA and TL and BW (p < 0.05-0.0001), however no close relationship was found between ∑PUFA and TL and BW (p > 0.05) (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: In order to understand trophic ecology, habitat use and migration of coral reef fish, fatty acid composition and levels were examined in the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected in the Malaysian South China Sea.Proportions of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) ranged from 55.0% to 66.5%, with the highest proportions in fatty acids, the second highest was monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) ranged from 30.7% to 40.2% while the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was the lowest ranged from 2.8% to 4.8%.Palmitic acid (16:0) was the most common in SAFA, oleic acid (C18:1ω9c) was the dominant in MUFA and linolenic acid (C18:3n3) showed the highest value in PUFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Oceanography and Environment, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu Terengganu, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Background: In order to understand trophic ecology, habitat use and migration of coral reef fish, fatty acid composition and levels were examined in the bigeye snapper Lutjanus lutjanus collected in the Malaysian South China Sea.

Results: Proportions of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) ranged from 55.0% to 66.5%, with the highest proportions in fatty acids, the second highest was monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) ranged from 30.7% to 40.2% while the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was the lowest ranged from 2.8% to 4.8%. Palmitic acid (16:0) was the most common in SAFA, oleic acid (C18:1ω9c) was the dominant in MUFA and linolenic acid (C18:3n3) showed the highest value in PUFA. Fatty acid concentrations, especially in SAFA and MUFA, increased with fish growth, suggesting diet and habitat shifts during the fish life history. Most of the fish had more than 1 of EPA: DHA ratio, which suggested that diets of L. lutjanus tended to be higher trophic organisms such as zooplankton and crustacean in coral ecosystem.

Conclusions: The diet shift revealed by the composition and levels of the fatty acid profile revealed potential pattern in the habitat use and migration scale in coral reef environment of L. lutjanus.

No MeSH data available.