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Comparison of intraoral radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the detection of periodontal defects: an in vitro study.

Bagis N, Kolsuz ME, Kursun S, Orhan K - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Results were considered significant at P < 0.05.The kappa values for inter-observer agreement between observers ranged between 0.78 and 0.96 for the CBCT, and 0.43 and 0.72 of intraoral images.The Kappa values for detecting defects on anterior teeth was the least, following premolar and molar teeth both CBCT and intraoral imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, Ankara University, 06560, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. nilsunbagis@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit with digital intraoral radiography technique for detecting periodontal defects.

Methods: The study material comprised 12 dry skulls with maxilla and mandible. Artificial defects (dehiscence, tunnel, and fenestration) were created on anterior, premolar and molar teeth separately using burs. In total 14 dehiscences, 13 fenestrations, eight tunnel and 16 without periodontal defect were used in the study. These were randomly created on dry skulls. Each teeth with and without defects were images at various vertical angles using each of the following modalities: a Planmeca Promax Cone Beam CT and a Digora photostimulable phosphor plates. Specificity and sensitivity for assessing periodontal defects by each radiographic technique were calculated. Chi-square statistics were used to evaluate differences between modalities. Kappa statistics assessed the agreement between observers. Results were considered significant at P < 0.05.

Results: The kappa values for inter-observer agreement between observers ranged between 0.78 and 0.96 for the CBCT, and 0.43 and 0.72 of intraoral images. The Kappa values for detecting defects on anterior teeth was the least, following premolar and molar teeth both CBCT and intraoral imaging.

Conclusions: CBCT has the highest sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for detecting various periodontal defects among the radiographic modalities examined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The photograph of the skulls (a) with defects, (b) and with wax covered to simulate the soft tissue
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Fig1: The photograph of the skulls (a) with defects, (b) and with wax covered to simulate the soft tissue

Mentions: In total 14 dehiscences, 13 fenestrations, eight tunnel and 16 without periodontal defect were used in the study. These were randomly created on dry skulls. For soft tissue simulation, maxilla and mandible were covered by double layers of boxing wax (Fig. 1). The defects were created by periodontal consultant (NB) in line with Mengel et al’s study [21]. The consultant noted the periodontal defects and these were used as the Gold standard for radiographic evaluation. The periodontal defects were created using high-speed equipment with copious air/water spray and rounded diamond burs (KG Sorensen, Zenith Dental ApS, Agerskov, Denmark).Fig. 1


Comparison of intraoral radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the detection of periodontal defects: an in vitro study.

Bagis N, Kolsuz ME, Kursun S, Orhan K - BMC Oral Health (2015)

The photograph of the skulls (a) with defects, (b) and with wax covered to simulate the soft tissue
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446848&req=5

Fig1: The photograph of the skulls (a) with defects, (b) and with wax covered to simulate the soft tissue
Mentions: In total 14 dehiscences, 13 fenestrations, eight tunnel and 16 without periodontal defect were used in the study. These were randomly created on dry skulls. For soft tissue simulation, maxilla and mandible were covered by double layers of boxing wax (Fig. 1). The defects were created by periodontal consultant (NB) in line with Mengel et al’s study [21]. The consultant noted the periodontal defects and these were used as the Gold standard for radiographic evaluation. The periodontal defects were created using high-speed equipment with copious air/water spray and rounded diamond burs (KG Sorensen, Zenith Dental ApS, Agerskov, Denmark).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Results were considered significant at P < 0.05.The kappa values for inter-observer agreement between observers ranged between 0.78 and 0.96 for the CBCT, and 0.43 and 0.72 of intraoral images.The Kappa values for detecting defects on anterior teeth was the least, following premolar and molar teeth both CBCT and intraoral imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, Ankara University, 06560, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. nilsunbagis@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit with digital intraoral radiography technique for detecting periodontal defects.

Methods: The study material comprised 12 dry skulls with maxilla and mandible. Artificial defects (dehiscence, tunnel, and fenestration) were created on anterior, premolar and molar teeth separately using burs. In total 14 dehiscences, 13 fenestrations, eight tunnel and 16 without periodontal defect were used in the study. These were randomly created on dry skulls. Each teeth with and without defects were images at various vertical angles using each of the following modalities: a Planmeca Promax Cone Beam CT and a Digora photostimulable phosphor plates. Specificity and sensitivity for assessing periodontal defects by each radiographic technique were calculated. Chi-square statistics were used to evaluate differences between modalities. Kappa statistics assessed the agreement between observers. Results were considered significant at P < 0.05.

Results: The kappa values for inter-observer agreement between observers ranged between 0.78 and 0.96 for the CBCT, and 0.43 and 0.72 of intraoral images. The Kappa values for detecting defects on anterior teeth was the least, following premolar and molar teeth both CBCT and intraoral imaging.

Conclusions: CBCT has the highest sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for detecting various periodontal defects among the radiographic modalities examined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus