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Neural Stimulation Has a Long-Term Effect on Foreign Vocabulary Acquisition.

Pasqualotto A, Kobanbay B, Proulx MJ - Neural Plast. (2015)

Bottom Line: Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays.There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner.These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the "linguistic network" to this area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Sabanci University, Tuzla, 34956 Istanbul, Turkey ; University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK ; Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays. There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner. For the first time, we used transcranial random noise stimulation on the frontal and parietal brain areas, in order to compare its effect on the acquisition of unknown foreign words and a sham, or placebo, condition was also included. This type of noninvasive neural stimulation enhances cortical activity by boosting the spontaneous activity of neurons. Foreign vocabulary acquisition was tested both immediately and seven days after the stimulation. We found that stimulation on the posterior parietal, but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or sham stimulation, significantly improved the memory performance in the long term. These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the "linguistic network" to this area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average percentage of correctly recalled words after seven days (in the second session) across the three types of brain stimulation. Error bars represent the ±SEM.
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fig3: Average percentage of correctly recalled words after seven days (in the second session) across the three types of brain stimulation. Error bars represent the ±SEM.

Mentions: We also ran a one-way AVOVA on the percentage of correctly recalled words in the second experimental session (seven days later) with stimulation (frontal, parietal, or sham) as an independent variable. We found a significant effect of stimulation (F(2, 51) = 3.85, p = 0.028) and Fisher's post hoc analysis confirmed that parietal stimulation was associated with better memory performance seven days later than both frontal and sham stimulation (p = 0.039 and p = 0.012, resp.), while there was no significant difference between frontal and sham stimulation (p = 0.63) (see Figure 3).


Neural Stimulation Has a Long-Term Effect on Foreign Vocabulary Acquisition.

Pasqualotto A, Kobanbay B, Proulx MJ - Neural Plast. (2015)

Average percentage of correctly recalled words after seven days (in the second session) across the three types of brain stimulation. Error bars represent the ±SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446492&req=5

fig3: Average percentage of correctly recalled words after seven days (in the second session) across the three types of brain stimulation. Error bars represent the ±SEM.
Mentions: We also ran a one-way AVOVA on the percentage of correctly recalled words in the second experimental session (seven days later) with stimulation (frontal, parietal, or sham) as an independent variable. We found a significant effect of stimulation (F(2, 51) = 3.85, p = 0.028) and Fisher's post hoc analysis confirmed that parietal stimulation was associated with better memory performance seven days later than both frontal and sham stimulation (p = 0.039 and p = 0.012, resp.), while there was no significant difference between frontal and sham stimulation (p = 0.63) (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays.There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner.These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the "linguistic network" to this area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Sabanci University, Tuzla, 34956 Istanbul, Turkey ; University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK ; Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays. There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner. For the first time, we used transcranial random noise stimulation on the frontal and parietal brain areas, in order to compare its effect on the acquisition of unknown foreign words and a sham, or placebo, condition was also included. This type of noninvasive neural stimulation enhances cortical activity by boosting the spontaneous activity of neurons. Foreign vocabulary acquisition was tested both immediately and seven days after the stimulation. We found that stimulation on the posterior parietal, but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or sham stimulation, significantly improved the memory performance in the long term. These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the "linguistic network" to this area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus