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Wing Morphometry and Acoustic Signals in Sterile and Wild Males: Implications for Mating Success in Ceratitis capitata.

de Souza JM, de Lima-Filho PA, Molina WF, de Almeida LM, de Gouveia MB, de Macêdo FP, Laumann RA, Paranhos BA - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: The individuals of Group 3 achieved more matings than those in Group 2.Wild males displayed lower pulse duration, higher intervals between pulses, and higher dominant frequency.Regarding the reproductive success, the morphological differences in the wings' shape between accepted and nonaccepted males are higher in wild males than in the irradiated ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular Biology and Genetics, Bioscience Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, 59078-970 Natal, RN, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The sterile insect technique (SIT) is widely utilized in the biological control of fruit flies of the family Tephritidae, particularly against the Mediterranean fruit fly. This study investigated the interaction between mating success and morphometric variation in the wings and the production of acoustic signals among three male groups of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann): (1) wild males, (2) irradiated with Co-60 (steriles), and (3) irradiated (steriles) and treated with ginger oil. The canonical variate analysis discriminated two groups (males irradiated and males wild), based on the morphological shape of the wings. Among males that emit buzz signals, wild males obtained copulation more frequently than males in Groups 2 and 3. The individuals of Group 3 achieved more matings than those in Group 2. Wild males displayed lower pulse duration, higher intervals between pulses, and higher dominant frequency. Regarding the reproductive success, the morphological differences in the wings' shape between accepted and nonaccepted males are higher in wild males than in the irradiated ones. The present results can be useful in programs using the sterile insect technique for biological control of C. capitata.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of male groups that emit buzz signals (gray bars) and proportion of males in each group that, after the emission of buzz signal, had successfully copulated (black bars), from males of three different treatments. Wild = wild population, sterile = insects irradiated in pulpal stage, and sterile + GRO = insects irradiated in pulpal stage and treated with GRO by aromatherapy. There is no statistical differences between the proportion of tested groups that emit buzz signals and significant differences between males that had successfully copulated after buzz emissions (χ2 test P = 0.05).
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fig5: Proportion of male groups that emit buzz signals (gray bars) and proportion of males in each group that, after the emission of buzz signal, had successfully copulated (black bars), from males of three different treatments. Wild = wild population, sterile = insects irradiated in pulpal stage, and sterile + GRO = insects irradiated in pulpal stage and treated with GRO by aromatherapy. There is no statistical differences between the proportion of tested groups that emit buzz signals and significant differences between males that had successfully copulated after buzz emissions (χ2 test P = 0.05).

Mentions: Males of the three treatment groups showed the same capacity to emit buzz signals (χ2 = 1.3; P = 0.52) (Figure 5). When the copulation success was compared among males groups, results showed a significant difference in the proportion of males that copulated with wild females (χ2 = 8.6; P = 0.013). A higher proportion of wild males that emit buzz signals achieved copulation (Figure 5) relative to Groups 2 and 3. Males of Group 3 displayed a higher proportion of copulation than males that were not treated (Figure 5). Buzz signals showed significant differences in pulse duration, pulse interval, and dominant frequency. Wild males presented lower pulse duration, higher intervals between pulses, and higher dominant frequency (Figure 6).


Wing Morphometry and Acoustic Signals in Sterile and Wild Males: Implications for Mating Success in Ceratitis capitata.

de Souza JM, de Lima-Filho PA, Molina WF, de Almeida LM, de Gouveia MB, de Macêdo FP, Laumann RA, Paranhos BA - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Proportion of male groups that emit buzz signals (gray bars) and proportion of males in each group that, after the emission of buzz signal, had successfully copulated (black bars), from males of three different treatments. Wild = wild population, sterile = insects irradiated in pulpal stage, and sterile + GRO = insects irradiated in pulpal stage and treated with GRO by aromatherapy. There is no statistical differences between the proportion of tested groups that emit buzz signals and significant differences between males that had successfully copulated after buzz emissions (χ2 test P = 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446484&req=5

fig5: Proportion of male groups that emit buzz signals (gray bars) and proportion of males in each group that, after the emission of buzz signal, had successfully copulated (black bars), from males of three different treatments. Wild = wild population, sterile = insects irradiated in pulpal stage, and sterile + GRO = insects irradiated in pulpal stage and treated with GRO by aromatherapy. There is no statistical differences between the proportion of tested groups that emit buzz signals and significant differences between males that had successfully copulated after buzz emissions (χ2 test P = 0.05).
Mentions: Males of the three treatment groups showed the same capacity to emit buzz signals (χ2 = 1.3; P = 0.52) (Figure 5). When the copulation success was compared among males groups, results showed a significant difference in the proportion of males that copulated with wild females (χ2 = 8.6; P = 0.013). A higher proportion of wild males that emit buzz signals achieved copulation (Figure 5) relative to Groups 2 and 3. Males of Group 3 displayed a higher proportion of copulation than males that were not treated (Figure 5). Buzz signals showed significant differences in pulse duration, pulse interval, and dominant frequency. Wild males presented lower pulse duration, higher intervals between pulses, and higher dominant frequency (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: The individuals of Group 3 achieved more matings than those in Group 2.Wild males displayed lower pulse duration, higher intervals between pulses, and higher dominant frequency.Regarding the reproductive success, the morphological differences in the wings' shape between accepted and nonaccepted males are higher in wild males than in the irradiated ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular Biology and Genetics, Bioscience Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, 59078-970 Natal, RN, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The sterile insect technique (SIT) is widely utilized in the biological control of fruit flies of the family Tephritidae, particularly against the Mediterranean fruit fly. This study investigated the interaction between mating success and morphometric variation in the wings and the production of acoustic signals among three male groups of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann): (1) wild males, (2) irradiated with Co-60 (steriles), and (3) irradiated (steriles) and treated with ginger oil. The canonical variate analysis discriminated two groups (males irradiated and males wild), based on the morphological shape of the wings. Among males that emit buzz signals, wild males obtained copulation more frequently than males in Groups 2 and 3. The individuals of Group 3 achieved more matings than those in Group 2. Wild males displayed lower pulse duration, higher intervals between pulses, and higher dominant frequency. Regarding the reproductive success, the morphological differences in the wings' shape between accepted and nonaccepted males are higher in wild males than in the irradiated ones. The present results can be useful in programs using the sterile insect technique for biological control of C. capitata.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus