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Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis.

Ahsan S, Burrascano J - Case Rep Infect Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis.Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection.Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Saint Michael's Medical Center, 111 Central Avenue, Newark, NJ 07102, USA.

ABSTRACT
Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case?

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An example of secondary syphilis provided by the CDC: a close-up view demonstrating keratotic lesions on the palms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: An example of secondary syphilis provided by the CDC: a close-up view demonstrating keratotic lesions on the palms.

Mentions: The term secondary (disseminated) syphilis is used to describe the clinically most florid stage of infection; it results from multiplication and wide dissemination of spirochete and lasts until a sufficient host response develops to exert some immune control over the spirochete (Figure 1). It usually begins 2 to 8 weeks after the appearance of a chancre, but this period is variable. In some cases the primary chancre may be present.


Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis.

Ahsan S, Burrascano J - Case Rep Infect Dis (2015)

An example of secondary syphilis provided by the CDC: a close-up view demonstrating keratotic lesions on the palms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446468&req=5

fig1: An example of secondary syphilis provided by the CDC: a close-up view demonstrating keratotic lesions on the palms.
Mentions: The term secondary (disseminated) syphilis is used to describe the clinically most florid stage of infection; it results from multiplication and wide dissemination of spirochete and lasts until a sufficient host response develops to exert some immune control over the spirochete (Figure 1). It usually begins 2 to 8 weeks after the appearance of a chancre, but this period is variable. In some cases the primary chancre may be present.

Bottom Line: Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis.Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection.Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Saint Michael's Medical Center, 111 Central Avenue, Newark, NJ 07102, USA.

ABSTRACT
Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case?

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus