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Functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease.

Golden HL, Agustus JL, Goll JC, Downey LE, Mummery CJ, Schott JM, Crutch SJ, Warren JD - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Bottom Line: Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease.However, the cocktail party effect (interaction of own name identification with auditory object segregation processing) produced activation of right supramarginal gyrus in the AD group that was significantly enhanced compared with the healthy control group.The findings delineate an altered functional neuroanatomical profile of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease that may constitute a novel computational signature of this neurodegenerative pathology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dementia Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Here we assessed the functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease using the well-known 'cocktail party effect' as a model paradigm whereby stored templates for auditory objects (e.g., hearing one's spoken name) are used to segregate auditory 'foreground' and 'background'. Patients with typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (n = 13) and age-matched healthy individuals (n = 17) underwent functional 3T-MRI using a sparse acquisition protocol with passive listening to auditory stimulus conditions comprising the participant's own name interleaved with or superimposed on multi-talker babble, and spectrally rotated (unrecognisable) analogues of these conditions. Name identification (conditions containing the participant's own name contrasted with spectrally rotated analogues) produced extensive bilateral activation involving superior temporal cortex in both the AD and healthy control groups, with no significant differences between groups. Auditory object segregation (conditions with interleaved name sounds contrasted with superimposed name sounds) produced activation of right posterior superior temporal cortex in both groups, again with no differences between groups. However, the cocktail party effect (interaction of own name identification with auditory object segregation processing) produced activation of right supramarginal gyrus in the AD group that was significantly enhanced compared with the healthy control group. The findings delineate an altered functional neuroanatomical profile of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease that may constitute a novel computational signature of this neurodegenerative pathology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical parametric maps of regional grey matter atrophy in the Alzheimer's disease group compared to the healthy control group based on a voxel-based morphometry analysis of structural brain MR images. Maps are presented on a group mean T1-weighted MR image in MNI space, thresholded leniently at p < 0.01 uncorrected for multiple comparisons over whole brain. The colour side bar codes voxel-wise t-values of grey matter change. Planes of representative sections are indicated using the corresponding MNI coordinates.
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f0020: Statistical parametric maps of regional grey matter atrophy in the Alzheimer's disease group compared to the healthy control group based on a voxel-based morphometry analysis of structural brain MR images. Maps are presented on a group mean T1-weighted MR image in MNI space, thresholded leniently at p < 0.01 uncorrected for multiple comparisons over whole brain. The colour side bar codes voxel-wise t-values of grey matter change. Planes of representative sections are indicated using the corresponding MNI coordinates.

Mentions: Comparison of the AD and healthy control groups in the VBM analysis revealed the anticipated profile of AD-associated regional grey matter atrophy involving hippocampi, temporal and retrosplenial cortices; statistical parametric maps are presented in Fig. S2 and significant regions of AD-associated grey matter atrophy are summarised in Table S1 in Supplementary Material on-line.


Functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease.

Golden HL, Agustus JL, Goll JC, Downey LE, Mummery CJ, Schott JM, Crutch SJ, Warren JD - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Statistical parametric maps of regional grey matter atrophy in the Alzheimer's disease group compared to the healthy control group based on a voxel-based morphometry analysis of structural brain MR images. Maps are presented on a group mean T1-weighted MR image in MNI space, thresholded leniently at p < 0.01 uncorrected for multiple comparisons over whole brain. The colour side bar codes voxel-wise t-values of grey matter change. Planes of representative sections are indicated using the corresponding MNI coordinates.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446369&req=5

f0020: Statistical parametric maps of regional grey matter atrophy in the Alzheimer's disease group compared to the healthy control group based on a voxel-based morphometry analysis of structural brain MR images. Maps are presented on a group mean T1-weighted MR image in MNI space, thresholded leniently at p < 0.01 uncorrected for multiple comparisons over whole brain. The colour side bar codes voxel-wise t-values of grey matter change. Planes of representative sections are indicated using the corresponding MNI coordinates.
Mentions: Comparison of the AD and healthy control groups in the VBM analysis revealed the anticipated profile of AD-associated regional grey matter atrophy involving hippocampi, temporal and retrosplenial cortices; statistical parametric maps are presented in Fig. S2 and significant regions of AD-associated grey matter atrophy are summarised in Table S1 in Supplementary Material on-line.

Bottom Line: Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease.However, the cocktail party effect (interaction of own name identification with auditory object segregation processing) produced activation of right supramarginal gyrus in the AD group that was significantly enhanced compared with the healthy control group.The findings delineate an altered functional neuroanatomical profile of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease that may constitute a novel computational signature of this neurodegenerative pathology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dementia Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Here we assessed the functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease using the well-known 'cocktail party effect' as a model paradigm whereby stored templates for auditory objects (e.g., hearing one's spoken name) are used to segregate auditory 'foreground' and 'background'. Patients with typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (n = 13) and age-matched healthy individuals (n = 17) underwent functional 3T-MRI using a sparse acquisition protocol with passive listening to auditory stimulus conditions comprising the participant's own name interleaved with or superimposed on multi-talker babble, and spectrally rotated (unrecognisable) analogues of these conditions. Name identification (conditions containing the participant's own name contrasted with spectrally rotated analogues) produced extensive bilateral activation involving superior temporal cortex in both the AD and healthy control groups, with no significant differences between groups. Auditory object segregation (conditions with interleaved name sounds contrasted with superimposed name sounds) produced activation of right posterior superior temporal cortex in both groups, again with no differences between groups. However, the cocktail party effect (interaction of own name identification with auditory object segregation processing) produced activation of right supramarginal gyrus in the AD group that was significantly enhanced compared with the healthy control group. The findings delineate an altered functional neuroanatomical profile of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease that may constitute a novel computational signature of this neurodegenerative pathology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus