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Can butterflies evade fire? Pupa location and heat tolerance in fire prone habitats of Florida.

Thom MD, Daniels JC, Kobziar LN, Colburn JR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Butterflies such as the atala hairstreak, Eumaeus atala Poey, and the frosted elfin, Callophrys irus Godart, are restricted to frequently disturbed habitats where their larval host plants occur.The capacity of these species to cope with fire is a critical consideration for land management and conservation strategies in the locations where they are found.For a species such as E. atala that pupates above ground, a population reduction from a burn event is a significant loss, and so decreasing the impact of prescribed fire on populations is critical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: North Central Soil Conservation Research Lab, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Morris, Minnesota, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Butterflies such as the atala hairstreak, Eumaeus atala Poey, and the frosted elfin, Callophrys irus Godart, are restricted to frequently disturbed habitats where their larval host plants occur. Pupae of these butterflies are noted to reside at the base of host plants or in the leaf litter and soil, which may allow them to escape direct mortality by fire, a prominent disturbance in many areas they inhabit. The capacity of these species to cope with fire is a critical consideration for land management and conservation strategies in the locations where they are found. Survival of E. atala pupae in relation to temperature and duration of heat pulse was tested using controlled water bath experiments and a series of prescribed fire field experiments. Survival of E. atala pupae was correlated to peak temperature and heat exposure in both laboratory and field trials. In addition, E. atala survival following field trials was correlated to depth of burial; complete mortality was observed for pupae at the soil surface. Fifty percent of E. atala survived the heat generated by prescribed fire when experimentally placed at depths ≥ 1.75 cm, suggesting that pupation of butterflies in the soil at depth can protect from fatal temperatures caused by fire. For a species such as E. atala that pupates above ground, a population reduction from a burn event is a significant loss, and so decreasing the impact of prescribed fire on populations is critical.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Probability of survival of E. atala pupa following controlled burning.Plot of survival probability of E. atala pupae to successful adult eclosion as a function of heat (a), peak temperature (b), and burial depth (c) from prescribed burning July 5-6th, 2012 at the Ordway Swisher Biological Station, Melrose, Florida. Nagelkurke/Cragg & Uhler’s pseudo R2 included as measure of model fit.
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pone.0126755.g006: Probability of survival of E. atala pupa following controlled burning.Plot of survival probability of E. atala pupae to successful adult eclosion as a function of heat (a), peak temperature (b), and burial depth (c) from prescribed burning July 5-6th, 2012 at the Ordway Swisher Biological Station, Melrose, Florida. Nagelkurke/Cragg & Uhler’s pseudo R2 included as measure of model fit.

Mentions: Heat, peak temperature, and burial depth are highly correlated, and so were analyzed in separate regression models. For all three models, pupa age was non-significant (p > 0.05) and is not displayed. Stepwise regression of the model including heat resulted in the most parsimonious and best fitting model being a single term model containing heat alone as a predictor (Table 4). The relationship is negative, with survival decreasing as heat increases (Fig 6A).


Can butterflies evade fire? Pupa location and heat tolerance in fire prone habitats of Florida.

Thom MD, Daniels JC, Kobziar LN, Colburn JR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Probability of survival of E. atala pupa following controlled burning.Plot of survival probability of E. atala pupae to successful adult eclosion as a function of heat (a), peak temperature (b), and burial depth (c) from prescribed burning July 5-6th, 2012 at the Ordway Swisher Biological Station, Melrose, Florida. Nagelkurke/Cragg & Uhler’s pseudo R2 included as measure of model fit.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446329&req=5

pone.0126755.g006: Probability of survival of E. atala pupa following controlled burning.Plot of survival probability of E. atala pupae to successful adult eclosion as a function of heat (a), peak temperature (b), and burial depth (c) from prescribed burning July 5-6th, 2012 at the Ordway Swisher Biological Station, Melrose, Florida. Nagelkurke/Cragg & Uhler’s pseudo R2 included as measure of model fit.
Mentions: Heat, peak temperature, and burial depth are highly correlated, and so were analyzed in separate regression models. For all three models, pupa age was non-significant (p > 0.05) and is not displayed. Stepwise regression of the model including heat resulted in the most parsimonious and best fitting model being a single term model containing heat alone as a predictor (Table 4). The relationship is negative, with survival decreasing as heat increases (Fig 6A).

Bottom Line: Butterflies such as the atala hairstreak, Eumaeus atala Poey, and the frosted elfin, Callophrys irus Godart, are restricted to frequently disturbed habitats where their larval host plants occur.The capacity of these species to cope with fire is a critical consideration for land management and conservation strategies in the locations where they are found.For a species such as E. atala that pupates above ground, a population reduction from a burn event is a significant loss, and so decreasing the impact of prescribed fire on populations is critical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: North Central Soil Conservation Research Lab, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Morris, Minnesota, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Butterflies such as the atala hairstreak, Eumaeus atala Poey, and the frosted elfin, Callophrys irus Godart, are restricted to frequently disturbed habitats where their larval host plants occur. Pupae of these butterflies are noted to reside at the base of host plants or in the leaf litter and soil, which may allow them to escape direct mortality by fire, a prominent disturbance in many areas they inhabit. The capacity of these species to cope with fire is a critical consideration for land management and conservation strategies in the locations where they are found. Survival of E. atala pupae in relation to temperature and duration of heat pulse was tested using controlled water bath experiments and a series of prescribed fire field experiments. Survival of E. atala pupae was correlated to peak temperature and heat exposure in both laboratory and field trials. In addition, E. atala survival following field trials was correlated to depth of burial; complete mortality was observed for pupae at the soil surface. Fifty percent of E. atala survived the heat generated by prescribed fire when experimentally placed at depths ≥ 1.75 cm, suggesting that pupation of butterflies in the soil at depth can protect from fatal temperatures caused by fire. For a species such as E. atala that pupates above ground, a population reduction from a burn event is a significant loss, and so decreasing the impact of prescribed fire on populations is critical.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus