Limits...
Ancient DNA analysis of the oldest canid species from the Siberian Arctic and genetic contribution to the domestic dog.

Lee EJ, Merriwether DA, Kasparov AK, Nikolskiy PA, Sotnikova MV, Pavlova EY, Pitulko VV - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In order to examine the genetic affinities of ancient Siberian canids species to the domestic dog and modern wolves, we obtained mitochondrial DNA control region sequences and compared them to published ancient and modern canid sequences.The older canid specimens illustrate affinities with pre-domestic dog/wolf lineages while others appear in the major phylogenetic clades of domestic dogs.Our results suggest a European origin of domestic dog may not be conclusive and illustrates an emerging complexity of genetic contribution of regional wolf breeds to the modern Canis gene pool.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, United States of America; Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Modern Arctic Siberia provides a wealth of resources for archaeological, geological, and paleontological research to investigate the population dynamics of faunal communities from the Pleistocene, particularly as the faunal material coming from permafrost has proven suitable for genetic studies. In order to examine the history of the Canid species in the Siberian Arctic, we carried out genetic analysis of fourteen canid remains from various sites, including the well-documented Upper Paleolithic Yana RHS and Early Holocene Zhokhov Island sites. Estimated age of samples range from as recent as 1,700 years before present (YBP) to at least 360,000 YBP for the remains of the extinct wolf, Canis cf. variabilis. In order to examine the genetic affinities of ancient Siberian canids species to the domestic dog and modern wolves, we obtained mitochondrial DNA control region sequences and compared them to published ancient and modern canid sequences. The older canid specimens illustrate affinities with pre-domestic dog/wolf lineages while others appear in the major phylogenetic clades of domestic dogs. Our results suggest a European origin of domestic dog may not be conclusive and illustrates an emerging complexity of genetic contribution of regional wolf breeds to the modern Canis gene pool.

No MeSH data available.


Median-joining network of ancient canid specimens for the mitochondrial DNA control region.Black circles indicate samples from our study (see Table 1 and S6 Table for sample ID). Sequences analyzed in the network span nucleotide positions 15561–15789.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446326&req=5

pone.0125759.g002: Median-joining network of ancient canid specimens for the mitochondrial DNA control region.Black circles indicate samples from our study (see Table 1 and S6 Table for sample ID). Sequences analyzed in the network span nucleotide positions 15561–15789.

Mentions: Direct analysis of whole mitogenomes from ancient canid specimens have recently suggested a European origin of domestic dogs based on the phylogenetic arrangement of three canids from Belgium dated to 26,000–36,000 YBP [10], which is in contrast to an Asian or Near East origin based on modern specimens [5,6]. Based on mtDNA control region sequences, the canid specimens from Yana RHS and Ulakhan-Sullar from our study appear as divergent as the ancient European specimens that were used as evidence of a European origin for domestic dogs. Therefore in light of our results, a European origin of domestic dogs may not be conclusive. The median joining network for ancient canid sequences (Fig 2) shows a Yana haplotype (S805) that is one step away from a Zhokhov haplotype (S902) that represents one of the main phylogenetic clades among canids (Clade A). Several ancient canid haplotypes are oriented around the Yana S805 including some of the oldest canid haplotypes reported to date, including the Ulakhan-Sullar specimen (Canis cf. variabilis, S809) from our study, in addition to ancient canid haplotypes from Belgium dated to 30,000 YBP and 36,000 YBP and a canid haplotype from Kostenki, Russia dated to 22,000 YBP [10]. The ancient canid specimens in this cluster may represent possible progenitors of the domestic dog, as coalescence time for the dog-wolf divergence is thought to have occurred by around 10,000 years ago [4,65] though some have suggested as early as 32,000 years ago [66]. Based on the position of the Yana S805 haplotype, it may potentially represent a direct link from the putative progenitor (including Canis cf. variabilis) to the domestic dog and modern wolf lineages.


Ancient DNA analysis of the oldest canid species from the Siberian Arctic and genetic contribution to the domestic dog.

Lee EJ, Merriwether DA, Kasparov AK, Nikolskiy PA, Sotnikova MV, Pavlova EY, Pitulko VV - PLoS ONE (2015)

Median-joining network of ancient canid specimens for the mitochondrial DNA control region.Black circles indicate samples from our study (see Table 1 and S6 Table for sample ID). Sequences analyzed in the network span nucleotide positions 15561–15789.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446326&req=5

pone.0125759.g002: Median-joining network of ancient canid specimens for the mitochondrial DNA control region.Black circles indicate samples from our study (see Table 1 and S6 Table for sample ID). Sequences analyzed in the network span nucleotide positions 15561–15789.
Mentions: Direct analysis of whole mitogenomes from ancient canid specimens have recently suggested a European origin of domestic dogs based on the phylogenetic arrangement of three canids from Belgium dated to 26,000–36,000 YBP [10], which is in contrast to an Asian or Near East origin based on modern specimens [5,6]. Based on mtDNA control region sequences, the canid specimens from Yana RHS and Ulakhan-Sullar from our study appear as divergent as the ancient European specimens that were used as evidence of a European origin for domestic dogs. Therefore in light of our results, a European origin of domestic dogs may not be conclusive. The median joining network for ancient canid sequences (Fig 2) shows a Yana haplotype (S805) that is one step away from a Zhokhov haplotype (S902) that represents one of the main phylogenetic clades among canids (Clade A). Several ancient canid haplotypes are oriented around the Yana S805 including some of the oldest canid haplotypes reported to date, including the Ulakhan-Sullar specimen (Canis cf. variabilis, S809) from our study, in addition to ancient canid haplotypes from Belgium dated to 30,000 YBP and 36,000 YBP and a canid haplotype from Kostenki, Russia dated to 22,000 YBP [10]. The ancient canid specimens in this cluster may represent possible progenitors of the domestic dog, as coalescence time for the dog-wolf divergence is thought to have occurred by around 10,000 years ago [4,65] though some have suggested as early as 32,000 years ago [66]. Based on the position of the Yana S805 haplotype, it may potentially represent a direct link from the putative progenitor (including Canis cf. variabilis) to the domestic dog and modern wolf lineages.

Bottom Line: In order to examine the genetic affinities of ancient Siberian canids species to the domestic dog and modern wolves, we obtained mitochondrial DNA control region sequences and compared them to published ancient and modern canid sequences.The older canid specimens illustrate affinities with pre-domestic dog/wolf lineages while others appear in the major phylogenetic clades of domestic dogs.Our results suggest a European origin of domestic dog may not be conclusive and illustrates an emerging complexity of genetic contribution of regional wolf breeds to the modern Canis gene pool.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, United States of America; Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Modern Arctic Siberia provides a wealth of resources for archaeological, geological, and paleontological research to investigate the population dynamics of faunal communities from the Pleistocene, particularly as the faunal material coming from permafrost has proven suitable for genetic studies. In order to examine the history of the Canid species in the Siberian Arctic, we carried out genetic analysis of fourteen canid remains from various sites, including the well-documented Upper Paleolithic Yana RHS and Early Holocene Zhokhov Island sites. Estimated age of samples range from as recent as 1,700 years before present (YBP) to at least 360,000 YBP for the remains of the extinct wolf, Canis cf. variabilis. In order to examine the genetic affinities of ancient Siberian canids species to the domestic dog and modern wolves, we obtained mitochondrial DNA control region sequences and compared them to published ancient and modern canid sequences. The older canid specimens illustrate affinities with pre-domestic dog/wolf lineages while others appear in the major phylogenetic clades of domestic dogs. Our results suggest a European origin of domestic dog may not be conclusive and illustrates an emerging complexity of genetic contribution of regional wolf breeds to the modern Canis gene pool.

No MeSH data available.