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Laser-stimulated fluorescence in paleontology.

Kaye TG, Falk AR, Pittman M, Sereno PC, Martin LD, Burnham DA, Gong E, Xu X, Wang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A laser's ability to concentrate very high flux rates both at the macroscopic and microscopic levels results in specimens fluorescing in ways a standard UV bulb cannot induce.The recent cost reductions in medium-power short wavelength lasers and use of standard photographic filters has now made this technique widely accessible to researchers.This represents a highly cost-effective way to address paleontology's preparatory bottleneck.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Fluorescence using ultraviolet (UV) light has seen increased use as a tool in paleontology over the last decade. Laser-stimulated fluorescence (LSF) is a next generation technique that is emerging as a way to fluoresce paleontological specimens that remain dark under typical UV. A laser's ability to concentrate very high flux rates both at the macroscopic and microscopic levels results in specimens fluorescing in ways a standard UV bulb cannot induce. Presented here are five paleontological case histories that illustrate the technique across a broad range of specimens and scales. Novel uses such as back-lighting opaque specimens to reveal detail and detection of specimens completely obscured by matrix are highlighted in these examples. The recent cost reductions in medium-power short wavelength lasers and use of standard photographic filters has now made this technique widely accessible to researchers. This technology has the potential to automate multiple aspects of paleontology, including preparation and sorting of microfossils. This represents a highly cost-effective way to address paleontology's preparatory bottleneck.

No MeSH data available.


Automated fossil sorter.Proof-of-concept prototype automated micro-fossil picker. The feeder bowl guides a stream of matrix under the laser while a video camera detects ‘blobs’ of a certain size and brightness. Fluorescing fossils are guided down a tube into a tray by a puff of compressed air.
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pone.0125923.g010: Automated fossil sorter.Proof-of-concept prototype automated micro-fossil picker. The feeder bowl guides a stream of matrix under the laser while a video camera detects ‘blobs’ of a certain size and brightness. Fluorescing fossils are guided down a tube into a tray by a puff of compressed air.

Mentions: The success of the manual method was followed by an experimental setup to automatically sort fluorescing fossils from concentrate without human intervention [24]. The entire experimental apparatus consisted of an industrial feeder bowl, green laser, video camera, computer-controlled air puff, and two bins for reject material and candidate specimens (Fig 10). See Supplemental Information for a more detailed description of the system (S1 Fig).


Laser-stimulated fluorescence in paleontology.

Kaye TG, Falk AR, Pittman M, Sereno PC, Martin LD, Burnham DA, Gong E, Xu X, Wang Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Automated fossil sorter.Proof-of-concept prototype automated micro-fossil picker. The feeder bowl guides a stream of matrix under the laser while a video camera detects ‘blobs’ of a certain size and brightness. Fluorescing fossils are guided down a tube into a tray by a puff of compressed air.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446324&req=5

pone.0125923.g010: Automated fossil sorter.Proof-of-concept prototype automated micro-fossil picker. The feeder bowl guides a stream of matrix under the laser while a video camera detects ‘blobs’ of a certain size and brightness. Fluorescing fossils are guided down a tube into a tray by a puff of compressed air.
Mentions: The success of the manual method was followed by an experimental setup to automatically sort fluorescing fossils from concentrate without human intervention [24]. The entire experimental apparatus consisted of an industrial feeder bowl, green laser, video camera, computer-controlled air puff, and two bins for reject material and candidate specimens (Fig 10). See Supplemental Information for a more detailed description of the system (S1 Fig).

Bottom Line: A laser's ability to concentrate very high flux rates both at the macroscopic and microscopic levels results in specimens fluorescing in ways a standard UV bulb cannot induce.The recent cost reductions in medium-power short wavelength lasers and use of standard photographic filters has now made this technique widely accessible to researchers.This represents a highly cost-effective way to address paleontology's preparatory bottleneck.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Fluorescence using ultraviolet (UV) light has seen increased use as a tool in paleontology over the last decade. Laser-stimulated fluorescence (LSF) is a next generation technique that is emerging as a way to fluoresce paleontological specimens that remain dark under typical UV. A laser's ability to concentrate very high flux rates both at the macroscopic and microscopic levels results in specimens fluorescing in ways a standard UV bulb cannot induce. Presented here are five paleontological case histories that illustrate the technique across a broad range of specimens and scales. Novel uses such as back-lighting opaque specimens to reveal detail and detection of specimens completely obscured by matrix are highlighted in these examples. The recent cost reductions in medium-power short wavelength lasers and use of standard photographic filters has now made this technique widely accessible to researchers. This technology has the potential to automate multiple aspects of paleontology, including preparation and sorting of microfossils. This represents a highly cost-effective way to address paleontology's preparatory bottleneck.

No MeSH data available.