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Having a lot of a good thing: multiple important group memberships as a source of self-esteem.

Jetten J, Branscombe NR, Haslam SA, Haslam C, Cruwys T, Jones JM, Cui L, Dingle G, Liu J, Murphy SC, Murphy S, Thai A, Walter Z, Zhang A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Study 2 shows that the effects of multiple important group memberships on personal self-esteem are not reducible to number of interpersonal ties.Studies 4 and 5 show that collective self-esteem mediates this effect, suggesting that membership in multiple important groups boosts personal self-esteem because people take pride in, and derive meaning from, important group memberships.Discussion focuses on when and why important group memberships act as a social resource that fuels personal self-esteem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Membership in important social groups can promote a positive identity. We propose and test an identity resource model in which personal self-esteem is boosted by membership in additional important social groups. Belonging to multiple important group memberships predicts personal self-esteem in children (Study 1a), older adults (Study 1b), and former residents of a homeless shelter (Study 1c). Study 2 shows that the effects of multiple important group memberships on personal self-esteem are not reducible to number of interpersonal ties. Studies 3a and 3b provide longitudinal evidence that multiple important group memberships predict personal self-esteem over time. Studies 4 and 5 show that collective self-esteem mediates this effect, suggesting that membership in multiple important groups boosts personal self-esteem because people take pride in, and derive meaning from, important group memberships. Discussion focuses on when and why important group memberships act as a social resource that fuels personal self-esteem.

No MeSH data available.


Study 5: the indirect effect of collective self-esteem on the relationship between multiple group memberships and personal self-esteem for University students in the US.Note. *p < .05, **p < .01. Correlations were based on a sample of N = 148. Beta within parentheses represents the direct effect.
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pone.0124609.g003: Study 5: the indirect effect of collective self-esteem on the relationship between multiple group memberships and personal self-esteem for University students in the US.Note. *p < .05, **p < .01. Correlations were based on a sample of N = 148. Beta within parentheses represents the direct effect.

Mentions: As in Study 4, because high identification with an increasing number of multiple groups was associated with higher levels of both personal and collective self-esteem, a mediation model tested H3 to determine whether collective self-esteem can account for the relationship between multiple groups and personal self-esteem. In line with this hypothesis, bootstrap analysis using 10,000 resamples revealed that collective self-esteem significantly mediated the effect of multiple important group memberships on personal self-esteem (IE = .06, SE = .027, 95% CI[.025, .114]) (see Fig 3). We also tested the reverse model: whether personal self-esteem mediated the relationship between multiple group memberships and collective self-esteem. Bootstrapping testing the reverse model revealed that personal self-esteem was also a significant mediator of the effect of multiple important group memberships on collective self-esteem (IE = .04, SE = .021, 95% CI[.011, .081]). Again, because this model is theoretically less plausible than the model treating CSE as mediator, and because the alternative model is weaker than the predicted model, we do not discuss this model further.


Having a lot of a good thing: multiple important group memberships as a source of self-esteem.

Jetten J, Branscombe NR, Haslam SA, Haslam C, Cruwys T, Jones JM, Cui L, Dingle G, Liu J, Murphy SC, Murphy S, Thai A, Walter Z, Zhang A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Study 5: the indirect effect of collective self-esteem on the relationship between multiple group memberships and personal self-esteem for University students in the US.Note. *p < .05, **p < .01. Correlations were based on a sample of N = 148. Beta within parentheses represents the direct effect.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446320&req=5

pone.0124609.g003: Study 5: the indirect effect of collective self-esteem on the relationship between multiple group memberships and personal self-esteem for University students in the US.Note. *p < .05, **p < .01. Correlations were based on a sample of N = 148. Beta within parentheses represents the direct effect.
Mentions: As in Study 4, because high identification with an increasing number of multiple groups was associated with higher levels of both personal and collective self-esteem, a mediation model tested H3 to determine whether collective self-esteem can account for the relationship between multiple groups and personal self-esteem. In line with this hypothesis, bootstrap analysis using 10,000 resamples revealed that collective self-esteem significantly mediated the effect of multiple important group memberships on personal self-esteem (IE = .06, SE = .027, 95% CI[.025, .114]) (see Fig 3). We also tested the reverse model: whether personal self-esteem mediated the relationship between multiple group memberships and collective self-esteem. Bootstrapping testing the reverse model revealed that personal self-esteem was also a significant mediator of the effect of multiple important group memberships on collective self-esteem (IE = .04, SE = .021, 95% CI[.011, .081]). Again, because this model is theoretically less plausible than the model treating CSE as mediator, and because the alternative model is weaker than the predicted model, we do not discuss this model further.

Bottom Line: Study 2 shows that the effects of multiple important group memberships on personal self-esteem are not reducible to number of interpersonal ties.Studies 4 and 5 show that collective self-esteem mediates this effect, suggesting that membership in multiple important groups boosts personal self-esteem because people take pride in, and derive meaning from, important group memberships.Discussion focuses on when and why important group memberships act as a social resource that fuels personal self-esteem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Membership in important social groups can promote a positive identity. We propose and test an identity resource model in which personal self-esteem is boosted by membership in additional important social groups. Belonging to multiple important group memberships predicts personal self-esteem in children (Study 1a), older adults (Study 1b), and former residents of a homeless shelter (Study 1c). Study 2 shows that the effects of multiple important group memberships on personal self-esteem are not reducible to number of interpersonal ties. Studies 3a and 3b provide longitudinal evidence that multiple important group memberships predict personal self-esteem over time. Studies 4 and 5 show that collective self-esteem mediates this effect, suggesting that membership in multiple important groups boosts personal self-esteem because people take pride in, and derive meaning from, important group memberships. Discussion focuses on when and why important group memberships act as a social resource that fuels personal self-esteem.

No MeSH data available.