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Valuing blue carbon: carbon sequestration benefits provided by the marine protected areas in Colombia.

Zarate-Barrera TG, Maldonado JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations.The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply.We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics-CEDE, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation.

No MeSH data available.


Present value of the benefits at different values of α, given a discount rate of 6%.Panel 1 with a loss rate of 0.58%. Panel 2 with a loss rate of 1.12%.
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pone.0126627.g008: Present value of the benefits at different values of α, given a discount rate of 6%.Panel 1 with a loss rate of 0.58%. Panel 2 with a loss rate of 1.12%.

Mentions: Finally, we estimate the elasticities of the expected benefits to changes in the value of α. Estimated elasticities can be observed in Fig 7, where it can be seen that the effect of α on the expected benefits, measured from the elasticity as described in (6), is initially less than proportional. However, for values of α greater than 0.7 this behavior changes, and with an increase of α, expected benefits react more than proportionally to changes in the value of the parameter. Similarly, Fig 8 shows that the present value of the expected benefits depends negatively on α, as expected. In both Figs (7 and 8) and panels (1 and 2) it can be observed that the loss rate xi has no significant effect on these elasticities.


Valuing blue carbon: carbon sequestration benefits provided by the marine protected areas in Colombia.

Zarate-Barrera TG, Maldonado JH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Present value of the benefits at different values of α, given a discount rate of 6%.Panel 1 with a loss rate of 0.58%. Panel 2 with a loss rate of 1.12%.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4446267&req=5

pone.0126627.g008: Present value of the benefits at different values of α, given a discount rate of 6%.Panel 1 with a loss rate of 0.58%. Panel 2 with a loss rate of 1.12%.
Mentions: Finally, we estimate the elasticities of the expected benefits to changes in the value of α. Estimated elasticities can be observed in Fig 7, where it can be seen that the effect of α on the expected benefits, measured from the elasticity as described in (6), is initially less than proportional. However, for values of α greater than 0.7 this behavior changes, and with an increase of α, expected benefits react more than proportionally to changes in the value of the parameter. Similarly, Fig 8 shows that the present value of the expected benefits depends negatively on α, as expected. In both Figs (7 and 8) and panels (1 and 2) it can be observed that the loss rate xi has no significant effect on these elasticities.

Bottom Line: To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations.The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply.We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics-CEDE, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation.

No MeSH data available.