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Osteogenic Matrix Cell Sheets Facilitate Osteogenesis in Irradiated Rat Bone.

Uchihara Y, Akahane M, Shimizu T, Ueha T, Morita Y, Nakasaki S, Kura T, Tohma Y, Kido A, Kawate K, Tanaka Y - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation.X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone.Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Reconstruction of large bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors is a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Extracorporeal autogenous irradiated bone grafting is a treatment option for bone reconstruction. However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation. In the present study, we established an autogenous irradiated bone graft model in the rat femur to assess whether osteogenic matrix cell sheets improve osteogenesis of the irradiated bone. Osteogenic matrix cell sheets were prepared from bone marrow-derived stromal cells and co-transplanted with irradiated bone. X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone. Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone. Histology showed bone union between the irradiated bone and host femur. Mechanical testing showed that the failure force at the irradiated bone site was significantly higher than in the control group. Our study indicates that osteogenic matrix cell sheet transplantation might be a powerful method to facilitate osteogenesis in irradiated bones, which may become a treatment option for reconstruction of bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microscopic appearance of the harvested femur at 12 weeks postoperatively. (a) Sheet group shows that smooth and rigid callus covers the grafted bone, resulting in bone union. (b) Control group shows that soft tissue covers the grafted bone, resulting in nonunion.
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fig3: Microscopic appearance of the harvested femur at 12 weeks postoperatively. (a) Sheet group shows that smooth and rigid callus covers the grafted bone, resulting in bone union. (b) Control group shows that soft tissue covers the grafted bone, resulting in nonunion.

Mentions: X-ray images were taken under anesthesia at 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively to evaluate bridging bone formation around the grafted devitalized bone. Rats were sacrificed and right hind limbs were harvested at 12 weeks postoperatively (Figure 3). After removal of the Kirschner wires, micro-computed tomography (CT) images were recorded using a Microfocus X-ray CT system. Quantitative 3D analysis was performed using a micro-CT system (SMX-160CTS; Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto, Japan).


Osteogenic Matrix Cell Sheets Facilitate Osteogenesis in Irradiated Rat Bone.

Uchihara Y, Akahane M, Shimizu T, Ueha T, Morita Y, Nakasaki S, Kura T, Tohma Y, Kido A, Kawate K, Tanaka Y - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Microscopic appearance of the harvested femur at 12 weeks postoperatively. (a) Sheet group shows that smooth and rigid callus covers the grafted bone, resulting in bone union. (b) Control group shows that soft tissue covers the grafted bone, resulting in nonunion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443646&req=5

fig3: Microscopic appearance of the harvested femur at 12 weeks postoperatively. (a) Sheet group shows that smooth and rigid callus covers the grafted bone, resulting in bone union. (b) Control group shows that soft tissue covers the grafted bone, resulting in nonunion.
Mentions: X-ray images were taken under anesthesia at 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively to evaluate bridging bone formation around the grafted devitalized bone. Rats were sacrificed and right hind limbs were harvested at 12 weeks postoperatively (Figure 3). After removal of the Kirschner wires, micro-computed tomography (CT) images were recorded using a Microfocus X-ray CT system. Quantitative 3D analysis was performed using a micro-CT system (SMX-160CTS; Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto, Japan).

Bottom Line: However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation.X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone.Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Reconstruction of large bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors is a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Extracorporeal autogenous irradiated bone grafting is a treatment option for bone reconstruction. However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation. In the present study, we established an autogenous irradiated bone graft model in the rat femur to assess whether osteogenic matrix cell sheets improve osteogenesis of the irradiated bone. Osteogenic matrix cell sheets were prepared from bone marrow-derived stromal cells and co-transplanted with irradiated bone. X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone. Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone. Histology showed bone union between the irradiated bone and host femur. Mechanical testing showed that the failure force at the irradiated bone site was significantly higher than in the control group. Our study indicates that osteogenic matrix cell sheet transplantation might be a powerful method to facilitate osteogenesis in irradiated bones, which may become a treatment option for reconstruction of bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus