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The association between hyperandrogenemia and the metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese women.

Valderhaug TG, Hertel JK, Nordstrand N, Dale PO, Hofsø D, Hjelmesæth J - Diabetol Metab Syndr (2015)

Bottom Line: Female abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenemia (HA), but few studies have addressed the possible association between HA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among obese women.On the other hand, a bidirectional relationship between HA and insulin resistance has been suggested.Free testosterone index (FTI) >0.6 defined HA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Morbid Obesity Centre, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway ; Division of Medicine, Department of Endocrinology, Akershus University Hospital HF, Sykehusveien 25, 1478 Nordbyhagen, Norway ; Division of Medicine and Laboratory Sciences, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

Background: Female abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenemia (HA), but few studies have addressed the possible association between HA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among obese women. Some studies indicate that insulin resistance may cause HA through different mechanisms. On the other hand, a bidirectional relationship between HA and insulin resistance has been suggested. Thus, we aimed to investigate if morbidly obese women with HA had higher odds of MetS and its components than those without HA (controls), independent of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) status.

Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 1900 consecutive treatment seeking morbidly obese women <50 years. Free testosterone index (FTI) >0.6 defined HA. Women with previously diagnosed PCOS and those with oligo- / anovulation combined with clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism were defined as having PCOS. Multiadjusted associations between HA and MetS were assessed by logistic regression analysis.

Results: Out of 1900 morbidly obese women, 1089 (57 %), 846 (45 %) and 312 (16 %) had MetS, HA and PCOS, respectively. Compared with controls (without HA), women with HA were younger (34 [1] years vs. 39 [2], p < 0.001) had a higher prevalence of MetS (62 % vs. 53 %, p < 0.001), type 2 diabetes (18 % vs. 15 %, p = 0.045), low HDL-cholesterol (65 % vs. 48 %, p < 0.001) and hypertriglyceridemia (48 % vs. 41 %, p = 0.004), but a lower prevalence of raised blood pressure (53 % vs. 59 %, p = 0.014). Multivariable analyses showed that HA was associated with increased odds of MetS (OR 1.61 [95 % CI 1.27, 2.02]), dysglycemia (1.65 [1.28, 2.11]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.58 [1.27, 1.97]), and hypertriglyceridemia (1.43 [1.15, 1.79]). After stratification for the presence of PCOS, the results remained largely unchanged in women without PCOS; MetS (1.52 [1.18, 1.96), dysglycemia (1.71 [1.30, 2.25]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.55 [1.22, 1.98]) and hypertriglyceridemia (1.36 [1.06, 1.74]).

Conclusion: Morbidly obese women with HA had an approximately 1.5-fold increased odds of having MetS even in the absence of PCOS. Randomized controlled clinical trials, including therapeutic strategies to lower free testosterone levels, are however necessary to explore any cause-and-effect relationship.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The figure shows the multivariable odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (OR [95 % CI]) for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in morbidly obese women with hyperandrogenemia compared to women without hyperandrogenemia (HA) (reference). Panel A comprises all the women included in the study (n = 1900), whereas Panel B and C comprises women included in the sub-analyses; PCOS absent (n = 1588) and PCOS present (n = 312)
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Fig3: The figure shows the multivariable odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (OR [95 % CI]) for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in morbidly obese women with hyperandrogenemia compared to women without hyperandrogenemia (HA) (reference). Panel A comprises all the women included in the study (n = 1900), whereas Panel B and C comprises women included in the sub-analyses; PCOS absent (n = 1588) and PCOS present (n = 312)

Mentions: In the univariate analysis, HA was associated with a 1.5 fold increased odds of MetS (OR 1.45 [95 % CI 1.20, 1.74]). This association remained statistically significant after adjustments for possible confounders (1.61 [1.27, 2.02]) (Table 2 and Fig. 3A). Moreover, HA was associated with approximately 1.5 fold increased adjusted odds of dysglycemia (1.65 [1.28, 2.11]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.58 [1.27, 1.97]), and hypertriglyceridemia (1.43 [1.15, 1.79]). HA was not associated with raised blood pressure (1.06 [0.85, 1.34]). A sub-analysis of 1588 women without PCOS showed that HA remained significantly associated with MetS (OR 1.52 [95 % CI 1.18, 1.96), dysglycemia (1.71 [1.30, 2.25]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.55 [1.22, 1.98]) and hypertriglyceridemia (1.36 [1.06, 1.74]) (Fig. 3B). In contrast, HA was neither significantly associated with MetS, nor its components in women with PCOS (Fig. 3C).Table 2


The association between hyperandrogenemia and the metabolic syndrome in morbidly obese women.

Valderhaug TG, Hertel JK, Nordstrand N, Dale PO, Hofsø D, Hjelmesæth J - Diabetol Metab Syndr (2015)

The figure shows the multivariable odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (OR [95 % CI]) for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in morbidly obese women with hyperandrogenemia compared to women without hyperandrogenemia (HA) (reference). Panel A comprises all the women included in the study (n = 1900), whereas Panel B and C comprises women included in the sub-analyses; PCOS absent (n = 1588) and PCOS present (n = 312)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443598&req=5

Fig3: The figure shows the multivariable odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (OR [95 % CI]) for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in morbidly obese women with hyperandrogenemia compared to women without hyperandrogenemia (HA) (reference). Panel A comprises all the women included in the study (n = 1900), whereas Panel B and C comprises women included in the sub-analyses; PCOS absent (n = 1588) and PCOS present (n = 312)
Mentions: In the univariate analysis, HA was associated with a 1.5 fold increased odds of MetS (OR 1.45 [95 % CI 1.20, 1.74]). This association remained statistically significant after adjustments for possible confounders (1.61 [1.27, 2.02]) (Table 2 and Fig. 3A). Moreover, HA was associated with approximately 1.5 fold increased adjusted odds of dysglycemia (1.65 [1.28, 2.11]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.58 [1.27, 1.97]), and hypertriglyceridemia (1.43 [1.15, 1.79]). HA was not associated with raised blood pressure (1.06 [0.85, 1.34]). A sub-analysis of 1588 women without PCOS showed that HA remained significantly associated with MetS (OR 1.52 [95 % CI 1.18, 1.96), dysglycemia (1.71 [1.30, 2.25]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.55 [1.22, 1.98]) and hypertriglyceridemia (1.36 [1.06, 1.74]) (Fig. 3B). In contrast, HA was neither significantly associated with MetS, nor its components in women with PCOS (Fig. 3C).Table 2

Bottom Line: Female abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenemia (HA), but few studies have addressed the possible association between HA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among obese women.On the other hand, a bidirectional relationship between HA and insulin resistance has been suggested.Free testosterone index (FTI) >0.6 defined HA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Morbid Obesity Centre, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway ; Division of Medicine, Department of Endocrinology, Akershus University Hospital HF, Sykehusveien 25, 1478 Nordbyhagen, Norway ; Division of Medicine and Laboratory Sciences, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

Background: Female abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenemia (HA), but few studies have addressed the possible association between HA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among obese women. Some studies indicate that insulin resistance may cause HA through different mechanisms. On the other hand, a bidirectional relationship between HA and insulin resistance has been suggested. Thus, we aimed to investigate if morbidly obese women with HA had higher odds of MetS and its components than those without HA (controls), independent of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) status.

Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 1900 consecutive treatment seeking morbidly obese women <50 years. Free testosterone index (FTI) >0.6 defined HA. Women with previously diagnosed PCOS and those with oligo- / anovulation combined with clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism were defined as having PCOS. Multiadjusted associations between HA and MetS were assessed by logistic regression analysis.

Results: Out of 1900 morbidly obese women, 1089 (57 %), 846 (45 %) and 312 (16 %) had MetS, HA and PCOS, respectively. Compared with controls (without HA), women with HA were younger (34 [1] years vs. 39 [2], p < 0.001) had a higher prevalence of MetS (62 % vs. 53 %, p < 0.001), type 2 diabetes (18 % vs. 15 %, p = 0.045), low HDL-cholesterol (65 % vs. 48 %, p < 0.001) and hypertriglyceridemia (48 % vs. 41 %, p = 0.004), but a lower prevalence of raised blood pressure (53 % vs. 59 %, p = 0.014). Multivariable analyses showed that HA was associated with increased odds of MetS (OR 1.61 [95 % CI 1.27, 2.02]), dysglycemia (1.65 [1.28, 2.11]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.58 [1.27, 1.97]), and hypertriglyceridemia (1.43 [1.15, 1.79]). After stratification for the presence of PCOS, the results remained largely unchanged in women without PCOS; MetS (1.52 [1.18, 1.96), dysglycemia (1.71 [1.30, 2.25]), low HDL-cholesterol (1.55 [1.22, 1.98]) and hypertriglyceridemia (1.36 [1.06, 1.74]).

Conclusion: Morbidly obese women with HA had an approximately 1.5-fold increased odds of having MetS even in the absence of PCOS. Randomized controlled clinical trials, including therapeutic strategies to lower free testosterone levels, are however necessary to explore any cause-and-effect relationship.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus