Limits...
Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: cardiovascular risk factors do not influence hearing threshold recovery.

Ciorba A, Hatzopoulos S, Bianchini C, Iannini V, Rosignoli M, Skarzynski H, Aimoni C - Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender.Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENT and Audiology Department, University Hospital of Ferrara, Italy;

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have suggested that risk factors for ischaemic vascular disease, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, can also be considered risk factors for the development of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). In this study, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these factors can influence hearing threshold recovery in patients affected by ISSNHL. A total of 141 subjects who suffered an episode of ISSNHL were included. All subjects were assessed with tonal audiometry, auditory brainstem responses and MRI to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Hearing tests were conducted at ISSNHL onset (t = 0) and after 30 days. Patients were divided into three classes according to the presence/absence of one or more cardiovascular risk factors including: history of smoking, total serum cholesterol/triglycerides, history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Values of hearing threshold recovery were estimated and comparisons were conducted across the three risk factor classes. 75% of patients affected by ISSNHL showed a threshold recovery. However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender. Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of cardiovascular risk factors by age and gender. There is a statistically significant difference between the average age of class 1 (no risk factors) and class 3 (two or more risk factors).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443566&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of cardiovascular risk factors by age and gender. There is a statistically significant difference between the average age of class 1 (no risk factors) and class 3 (two or more risk factors).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the distribution of age, gender and cardiovascular risk factors of the 141 patients. The data show a slight gender effect on age. The average age of female subjects was higher than it males and is affected by ISSNHL.


Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: cardiovascular risk factors do not influence hearing threshold recovery.

Ciorba A, Hatzopoulos S, Bianchini C, Iannini V, Rosignoli M, Skarzynski H, Aimoni C - Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital (2015)

Distribution of cardiovascular risk factors by age and gender. There is a statistically significant difference between the average age of class 1 (no risk factors) and class 3 (two or more risk factors).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443566&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of cardiovascular risk factors by age and gender. There is a statistically significant difference between the average age of class 1 (no risk factors) and class 3 (two or more risk factors).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the distribution of age, gender and cardiovascular risk factors of the 141 patients. The data show a slight gender effect on age. The average age of female subjects was higher than it males and is affected by ISSNHL.

Bottom Line: However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender.Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ENT and Audiology Department, University Hospital of Ferrara, Italy;

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have suggested that risk factors for ischaemic vascular disease, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, can also be considered risk factors for the development of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). In this study, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these factors can influence hearing threshold recovery in patients affected by ISSNHL. A total of 141 subjects who suffered an episode of ISSNHL were included. All subjects were assessed with tonal audiometry, auditory brainstem responses and MRI to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Hearing tests were conducted at ISSNHL onset (t = 0) and after 30 days. Patients were divided into three classes according to the presence/absence of one or more cardiovascular risk factors including: history of smoking, total serum cholesterol/triglycerides, history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Values of hearing threshold recovery were estimated and comparisons were conducted across the three risk factor classes. 75% of patients affected by ISSNHL showed a threshold recovery. However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender. Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus