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Magnetic nanoparticles: a new tool for antibiotic delivery to sinonasal tissues. Results of preliminary studies.

Dobretsov K, Stolyar S, Lopatin A - Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital (2015)

Bottom Line: In 30 in vitro experiments, magnetisation of Fe2O3·nH2O nanoparticles resulted in their diffuse infiltration into the mucosa, cartilage and bone tissue of the nose and paranasal sinuses.Positive results of experimental studies provide a basis for further clinical investigations of these magnetic nanoparticles and their use in otorhinolaryngology.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Siberian Clinical Center FMBA, Krasnoyarsk, Russia;

ABSTRACT
Herein we examined the toxicity, penetration properties and ability of Fe2O3·nH2O magnetic nanoparticles extracted from silt of the Borovoye Lake (Krasnoyarsk, Russia) to bind an antibiotic. Experimental studies were carried out using magnetic nanoparticles alone and after antibiotic exposure in tissue samples from nasal mucosa, cartilage and bone (in vitro). Toxicity of particles was studied in laboratory animals (in vivo). Tissues removed at endonasal surgery (nasal mucosa, cartilage and bone of the nasal septum) were placed in solution containing nanoparticles and exposed to a magnetic field. Distribution of nanoparticles was determined by Perls' reaction. After intravenous injection, possible toxic effects of injected nanoparticles on the organs and tissues of rats were evaluated by histological examination. Binding between the nanoparticles and antibiotic (amoxicillin clavulanate) was studied using infrared spectroscopy. In 30 in vitro experiments, magnetisation of Fe2O3·nH2O nanoparticles resulted in their diffuse infiltration into the mucosa, cartilage and bone tissue of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Intravenous injection of 0.2 ml of magnetic nanoparticles into the rat's tail vein did not result in any changes in parenchymatous organs, and the nanoparticles were completely eliminated from the body within 24 hours. The interaction of nanoparticles with amoxicillin clavulanate was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Positive results of experimental studies provide a basis for further clinical investigations of these magnetic nanoparticles and their use in otorhinolaryngology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetic nanoparticles Fe2O3: a) scanning tunnelling microscopy, ×20 nm; b) schematic drawing of Fe-O-Fe links in a non-defect phase: smaller grey balls, O and OH ligands; larger grey balls, Fe3+.
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Figure 5: Magnetic nanoparticles Fe2O3: a) scanning tunnelling microscopy, ×20 nm; b) schematic drawing of Fe-O-Fe links in a non-defect phase: smaller grey balls, O and OH ligands; larger grey balls, Fe3+.

Mentions: In 2006, magnetic nanoparticles of bacterial origin were developed in the Institute of Biophysics (Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Krasnoyarsk, Russia). They were synthesised by cultivating gram-negative bacilli from the Enterobacteriaceae family (genus Klebsiella, type Klebsiella oxytoca) isolated from silt (sapropel) of the lake Borovoye, Krasnoyarsk District, Russia. Based on comparison of the results of magnetic and direct structural methods, the resulting magnetic nanoparticles are ferrihydrite Fe2O3-nH2O as seen in Figure 5. It was also demonstrated that the ferrihydrite nanoparticles 2-5 nm in size produced by Klebsiella oxytoca have an effective magnetic charge enabling magnetic control of these nanoparticles 13.


Magnetic nanoparticles: a new tool for antibiotic delivery to sinonasal tissues. Results of preliminary studies.

Dobretsov K, Stolyar S, Lopatin A - Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital (2015)

Magnetic nanoparticles Fe2O3: a) scanning tunnelling microscopy, ×20 nm; b) schematic drawing of Fe-O-Fe links in a non-defect phase: smaller grey balls, O and OH ligands; larger grey balls, Fe3+.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443564&req=5

Figure 5: Magnetic nanoparticles Fe2O3: a) scanning tunnelling microscopy, ×20 nm; b) schematic drawing of Fe-O-Fe links in a non-defect phase: smaller grey balls, O and OH ligands; larger grey balls, Fe3+.
Mentions: In 2006, magnetic nanoparticles of bacterial origin were developed in the Institute of Biophysics (Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Krasnoyarsk, Russia). They were synthesised by cultivating gram-negative bacilli from the Enterobacteriaceae family (genus Klebsiella, type Klebsiella oxytoca) isolated from silt (sapropel) of the lake Borovoye, Krasnoyarsk District, Russia. Based on comparison of the results of magnetic and direct structural methods, the resulting magnetic nanoparticles are ferrihydrite Fe2O3-nH2O as seen in Figure 5. It was also demonstrated that the ferrihydrite nanoparticles 2-5 nm in size produced by Klebsiella oxytoca have an effective magnetic charge enabling magnetic control of these nanoparticles 13.

Bottom Line: In 30 in vitro experiments, magnetisation of Fe2O3·nH2O nanoparticles resulted in their diffuse infiltration into the mucosa, cartilage and bone tissue of the nose and paranasal sinuses.Positive results of experimental studies provide a basis for further clinical investigations of these magnetic nanoparticles and their use in otorhinolaryngology.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Siberian Clinical Center FMBA, Krasnoyarsk, Russia;

ABSTRACT
Herein we examined the toxicity, penetration properties and ability of Fe2O3·nH2O magnetic nanoparticles extracted from silt of the Borovoye Lake (Krasnoyarsk, Russia) to bind an antibiotic. Experimental studies were carried out using magnetic nanoparticles alone and after antibiotic exposure in tissue samples from nasal mucosa, cartilage and bone (in vitro). Toxicity of particles was studied in laboratory animals (in vivo). Tissues removed at endonasal surgery (nasal mucosa, cartilage and bone of the nasal septum) were placed in solution containing nanoparticles and exposed to a magnetic field. Distribution of nanoparticles was determined by Perls' reaction. After intravenous injection, possible toxic effects of injected nanoparticles on the organs and tissues of rats were evaluated by histological examination. Binding between the nanoparticles and antibiotic (amoxicillin clavulanate) was studied using infrared spectroscopy. In 30 in vitro experiments, magnetisation of Fe2O3·nH2O nanoparticles resulted in their diffuse infiltration into the mucosa, cartilage and bone tissue of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Intravenous injection of 0.2 ml of magnetic nanoparticles into the rat's tail vein did not result in any changes in parenchymatous organs, and the nanoparticles were completely eliminated from the body within 24 hours. The interaction of nanoparticles with amoxicillin clavulanate was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Positive results of experimental studies provide a basis for further clinical investigations of these magnetic nanoparticles and their use in otorhinolaryngology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus