Limits...
Visual working memory continues to develop through adolescence.

Isbell E, Fukuda K, Neville HJ, Vogel EK - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: We tested whether the capacity estimates observed in early or later years of adolescence were comparable to the estimates obtained from adults.Our results demonstrated that the capacity of VWM continues to develop throughout adolescence, not reaching adult levels even in 16-year-olds.These findings suggest that VWM capacity displays a prolonged development, similar to the protracted trajectories observed in various other aspects of cognition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Oregon , Eugene, OR, USA.

ABSTRACT
The capacity of visual working memory (VWM) refers to the amount of visual information that can be maintained in mind at once, readily accessible for ongoing tasks. In healthy young adults, the capacity limit of VWM corresponds to about three simple objects. While some researchers argued that VWM capacity becomes adult-like in early years of life, others claimed that the capacity of VWM continues to develop beyond middle childhood. Here we assessed whether VWM capacity reaches adult levels in adolescence. Using an adaptation of the visual change detection task, we measured VWM capacity estimates in 13-year-olds, 16-year-olds, and young adults. We tested whether the capacity estimates observed in early or later years of adolescence were comparable to the estimates obtained from adults. Our results demonstrated that the capacity of VWM continues to develop throughout adolescence, not reaching adult levels even in 16-year-olds. These findings suggest that VWM capacity displays a prolonged development, similar to the protracted trajectories observed in various other aspects of cognition.

No MeSH data available.


Example stimulus displays (not drawn to scale) for a ‚Äúchange trial‚ÄĚ of set size 2.
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Figure 1: Example stimulus displays (not drawn to scale) for a ‚Äúchange trial‚ÄĚ of set size 2.

Mentions: On each trial, the first array of stimuli (the memory array) was presented for 150 ms, followed by a 900 ms blank retention interval. Example stimuli are shown in Figure 1. After the retention interval, only one object reappeared on the screen. In half of the trials, this object was identical to the object that appeared in the same location within the memory array. In the other half of the trials, the object was a different color from the object that appeared in the same location before. This was always a new color, not presented elsewhere in the display within the memory array. Participants were informed that in each trial a group of children wearing different colored shirts were going to come up on the screen, disappear briefly, and then only one child would come back to the screen, in the exact location he was before. They were asked to indicate whether the child was wearing the same shirt or had changed his shirt. The participants indicated their responses using the left and right triggers of a video game controller, which were marked as ‚Äúsame‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúchange‚ÄĚ respectively. The test item remained on the screen until a response was made.


Visual working memory continues to develop through adolescence.

Isbell E, Fukuda K, Neville HJ, Vogel EK - Front Psychol (2015)

Example stimulus displays (not drawn to scale) for a ‚Äúchange trial‚ÄĚ of set size 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443298&req=5

Figure 1: Example stimulus displays (not drawn to scale) for a ‚Äúchange trial‚ÄĚ of set size 2.
Mentions: On each trial, the first array of stimuli (the memory array) was presented for 150 ms, followed by a 900 ms blank retention interval. Example stimuli are shown in Figure 1. After the retention interval, only one object reappeared on the screen. In half of the trials, this object was identical to the object that appeared in the same location within the memory array. In the other half of the trials, the object was a different color from the object that appeared in the same location before. This was always a new color, not presented elsewhere in the display within the memory array. Participants were informed that in each trial a group of children wearing different colored shirts were going to come up on the screen, disappear briefly, and then only one child would come back to the screen, in the exact location he was before. They were asked to indicate whether the child was wearing the same shirt or had changed his shirt. The participants indicated their responses using the left and right triggers of a video game controller, which were marked as ‚Äúsame‚ÄĚ and ‚Äúchange‚ÄĚ respectively. The test item remained on the screen until a response was made.

Bottom Line: We tested whether the capacity estimates observed in early or later years of adolescence were comparable to the estimates obtained from adults.Our results demonstrated that the capacity of VWM continues to develop throughout adolescence, not reaching adult levels even in 16-year-olds.These findings suggest that VWM capacity displays a prolonged development, similar to the protracted trajectories observed in various other aspects of cognition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Oregon , Eugene, OR, USA.

ABSTRACT
The capacity of visual working memory (VWM) refers to the amount of visual information that can be maintained in mind at once, readily accessible for ongoing tasks. In healthy young adults, the capacity limit of VWM corresponds to about three simple objects. While some researchers argued that VWM capacity becomes adult-like in early years of life, others claimed that the capacity of VWM continues to develop beyond middle childhood. Here we assessed whether VWM capacity reaches adult levels in adolescence. Using an adaptation of the visual change detection task, we measured VWM capacity estimates in 13-year-olds, 16-year-olds, and young adults. We tested whether the capacity estimates observed in early or later years of adolescence were comparable to the estimates obtained from adults. Our results demonstrated that the capacity of VWM continues to develop throughout adolescence, not reaching adult levels even in 16-year-olds. These findings suggest that VWM capacity displays a prolonged development, similar to the protracted trajectories observed in various other aspects of cognition.

No MeSH data available.