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An fMRI investigation of the effects of attempted naming on word retrieval in aphasia.

Heath S, McMahon KL, Nickels LA, Angwin A, MacDonald AD, van Hees S, McKinnon E, Johnson K, Copland DA - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: In healthy controls, picture naming performance can be facilitated by a single prior exposure to the same picture ("priming").The timing and number of prior exposures was manipulated, with investigation of both short-term effects (single prior exposure over a period of minutes) and long-term effects (multiple presentations over a period of days).At a neural level, effects of long-term facilitation were noted in the left precuneus for one participant with aphasia, a result also identified for the equivalent contrast in controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW, Australia ; Language Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, St Lucia QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In healthy controls, picture naming performance can be facilitated by a single prior exposure to the same picture ("priming"). This priming phenomenon is utilized in the treatment of aphasia, which often includes repeated picture naming as part of a therapeutic task. The current study sought to determine whether single and/or multiple exposures facilitate subsequent naming in aphasia and whether such facilitatory effects act through normal priming mechanisms. A functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was employed to explore the beneficial effects of attempted naming in two individuals with aphasia and a control group. The timing and number of prior exposures was manipulated, with investigation of both short-term effects (single prior exposure over a period of minutes) and long-term effects (multiple presentations over a period of days). Following attempted naming, both short-term and long-term facilitated items showed improvement for controls, while only the long-term condition showed benefits at a behavioral level for the participants with aphasia. At a neural level, effects of long-term facilitation were noted in the left precuneus for one participant with aphasia, a result also identified for the equivalent contrast in controls. It appears that multiple attempts are required to improve naming performance in the presence of anomia and that for some individuals with aphasia the source of facilitation may be similar to unimpaired mechanisms engaged outside the language network.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Whole brain result for P02 (3dClustSim minimum cluster threshold 55 voxels). LT, long-term facilitated and previously difficult to name; UNF-named, unfacilitated and previously accurately named.
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Figure 4: Whole brain result for P02 (3dClustSim minimum cluster threshold 55 voxels). LT, long-term facilitated and previously difficult to name; UNF-named, unfacilitated and previously accurately named.

Mentions: The only significant difference in neural activity was found for P02, with greater activity for long-term facilitated items (facilitated and previously difficult to name) when compared to unfacilitated-named (unfacilitated and previously accurately named) items in the left precuneus (see Figure 4). In controls, the same precuneus region was identified for the equivalent contrast. Further, as we found long-term results in the whole brain analyses within the left inferior frontal region for controls, a subsequent bilateral region of interest (ROI) analysis in this area was conducted for both individuals with aphasia. Anatomical ROIs were created with the WFU_PickAtlas2 toolbox within SPM5, using the IBASPM116 atlas and implementing WFU ROI masking (Maldjian et al., 2003, 2004). Six ROIs were analyzed for each participant, including bilateral pars orbitalis, pars triangularis, and pars opercularis. No significant results were identified for either participant for conditions of interest.


An fMRI investigation of the effects of attempted naming on word retrieval in aphasia.

Heath S, McMahon KL, Nickels LA, Angwin A, MacDonald AD, van Hees S, McKinnon E, Johnson K, Copland DA - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Whole brain result for P02 (3dClustSim minimum cluster threshold 55 voxels). LT, long-term facilitated and previously difficult to name; UNF-named, unfacilitated and previously accurately named.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4443028&req=5

Figure 4: Whole brain result for P02 (3dClustSim minimum cluster threshold 55 voxels). LT, long-term facilitated and previously difficult to name; UNF-named, unfacilitated and previously accurately named.
Mentions: The only significant difference in neural activity was found for P02, with greater activity for long-term facilitated items (facilitated and previously difficult to name) when compared to unfacilitated-named (unfacilitated and previously accurately named) items in the left precuneus (see Figure 4). In controls, the same precuneus region was identified for the equivalent contrast. Further, as we found long-term results in the whole brain analyses within the left inferior frontal region for controls, a subsequent bilateral region of interest (ROI) analysis in this area was conducted for both individuals with aphasia. Anatomical ROIs were created with the WFU_PickAtlas2 toolbox within SPM5, using the IBASPM116 atlas and implementing WFU ROI masking (Maldjian et al., 2003, 2004). Six ROIs were analyzed for each participant, including bilateral pars orbitalis, pars triangularis, and pars opercularis. No significant results were identified for either participant for conditions of interest.

Bottom Line: In healthy controls, picture naming performance can be facilitated by a single prior exposure to the same picture ("priming").The timing and number of prior exposures was manipulated, with investigation of both short-term effects (single prior exposure over a period of minutes) and long-term effects (multiple presentations over a period of days).At a neural level, effects of long-term facilitation were noted in the left precuneus for one participant with aphasia, a result also identified for the equivalent contrast in controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW, Australia ; Language Neuroscience Laboratory, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, St Lucia QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In healthy controls, picture naming performance can be facilitated by a single prior exposure to the same picture ("priming"). This priming phenomenon is utilized in the treatment of aphasia, which often includes repeated picture naming as part of a therapeutic task. The current study sought to determine whether single and/or multiple exposures facilitate subsequent naming in aphasia and whether such facilitatory effects act through normal priming mechanisms. A functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was employed to explore the beneficial effects of attempted naming in two individuals with aphasia and a control group. The timing and number of prior exposures was manipulated, with investigation of both short-term effects (single prior exposure over a period of minutes) and long-term effects (multiple presentations over a period of days). Following attempted naming, both short-term and long-term facilitated items showed improvement for controls, while only the long-term condition showed benefits at a behavioral level for the participants with aphasia. At a neural level, effects of long-term facilitation were noted in the left precuneus for one participant with aphasia, a result also identified for the equivalent contrast in controls. It appears that multiple attempts are required to improve naming performance in the presence of anomia and that for some individuals with aphasia the source of facilitation may be similar to unimpaired mechanisms engaged outside the language network.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus