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The development of robotic surgery in the Middle East.

Rabah DM, Al-Abdin OZ - Arab J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: Therefore, no more than 10 articles were found that were relevant to the scope of this review.There are 10 da Vinci robots in the KSA, with over 35 trained surgeons, yet very few index cases.By consolidating the robotic surgery procedures in high-volume speciality centres, hospitals can increase their case loads by promoting the multidisciplinary use of the robotic system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, King Saud University, Princess Jouhara Al-Ibrahim Cancer Research Centre, King Khaled University Hospital, PO Box 7805, Riyadh 11472, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We provide an overview of the development of robotic surgery in the Middle East since its first introduction in April 2003 in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).

Methods: We searched MEDLINE using 20 keywords/phrases and identified 44 reports, of which only 15 were relevant. Five of these articles were duplicated when using two different keywords. Therefore, no more than 10 articles were found that were relevant to the scope of this review.

Results: After completing the MEDLINE search to identify articles related to robotic surgery in the Middle East, we noted that all of the nine case series (Level of evidence 3a) reported took place in the KSA, with no other reported series from other Middle-Eastern countries. To the best of our knowledge, there are no operating robotic surgery systems (da Vinci, Intuitive Surgical, CA, USA) in the Middle East other than in the KSA, Qatar and Egypt. The number of robotic surgery cases and newly adapted robotic procedures is increasing. Two major institutions in the KSA have expanded to robotic-assisted pyeloplasty in all of their cases since January 2005.

Conclusion: There are 10 da Vinci robots in the KSA, with over 35 trained surgeons, yet very few index cases. The cancer incidence rate, lack of practitioners' referrals, and demographic age distribution are all factors that contribute significantly to the few index cases reported. By consolidating the robotic surgery procedures in high-volume speciality centres, hospitals can increase their case loads by promoting the multidisciplinary use of the robotic system. Even though growth is relatively slow, we believe that robotic surgery is gaining momentum, and its benefits and innovation will soon be grasped in other countries in the Middle East.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Robotic surgery procedures performed in the KSA by speciality.
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f0015: Robotic surgery procedures performed in the KSA by speciality.

Mentions: Over the past 7 years the number of procedures performed, by specialisation, in KSA were; 339 in urology, 231 in gynaecology, 209 in general surgery, 87 in paediatric and 46 in cardiac surgery (Fig. 3).


The development of robotic surgery in the Middle East.

Rabah DM, Al-Abdin OZ - Arab J Urol (2012)

Robotic surgery procedures performed in the KSA by speciality.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4442898&req=5

f0015: Robotic surgery procedures performed in the KSA by speciality.
Mentions: Over the past 7 years the number of procedures performed, by specialisation, in KSA were; 339 in urology, 231 in gynaecology, 209 in general surgery, 87 in paediatric and 46 in cardiac surgery (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Therefore, no more than 10 articles were found that were relevant to the scope of this review.There are 10 da Vinci robots in the KSA, with over 35 trained surgeons, yet very few index cases.By consolidating the robotic surgery procedures in high-volume speciality centres, hospitals can increase their case loads by promoting the multidisciplinary use of the robotic system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, King Saud University, Princess Jouhara Al-Ibrahim Cancer Research Centre, King Khaled University Hospital, PO Box 7805, Riyadh 11472, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We provide an overview of the development of robotic surgery in the Middle East since its first introduction in April 2003 in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).

Methods: We searched MEDLINE using 20 keywords/phrases and identified 44 reports, of which only 15 were relevant. Five of these articles were duplicated when using two different keywords. Therefore, no more than 10 articles were found that were relevant to the scope of this review.

Results: After completing the MEDLINE search to identify articles related to robotic surgery in the Middle East, we noted that all of the nine case series (Level of evidence 3a) reported took place in the KSA, with no other reported series from other Middle-Eastern countries. To the best of our knowledge, there are no operating robotic surgery systems (da Vinci, Intuitive Surgical, CA, USA) in the Middle East other than in the KSA, Qatar and Egypt. The number of robotic surgery cases and newly adapted robotic procedures is increasing. Two major institutions in the KSA have expanded to robotic-assisted pyeloplasty in all of their cases since January 2005.

Conclusion: There are 10 da Vinci robots in the KSA, with over 35 trained surgeons, yet very few index cases. The cancer incidence rate, lack of practitioners' referrals, and demographic age distribution are all factors that contribute significantly to the few index cases reported. By consolidating the robotic surgery procedures in high-volume speciality centres, hospitals can increase their case loads by promoting the multidisciplinary use of the robotic system. Even though growth is relatively slow, we believe that robotic surgery is gaining momentum, and its benefits and innovation will soon be grasped in other countries in the Middle East.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus