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Chicken meat anaphylaxis in a child with no allergies to eggs or feathers.

Can C, Yazicioglu M, Ciplak G - Iran J Pediatr (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Allergy.

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A fifteen-year-old male patient with a personal history of chicken meat allergy was referred to our clinic... His symptoms gradually resolved without admission to hospital... Subsequently, he did not consume any chicken meat until last year (2013), when he reported nasal itching and irritability while passing by restaurants serving chicken doner kebab... His physical examination was normal... Laboratory results on admission: CBC with white blood cell differential was within normal range; serum total IgE was 351 IU/ml... The clinical history of our patient and the results of in vivo and in vitro tests were compatible with chicken meat allergy... Our case represents the third reported case of chicken meat anaphylaxis in children with no allergies to eggs or feathers... In our patient, SPTs were found to be positive with commercial allergenic extracts of egg white, egg yolk, and chicken... Gal d 5 (alpha-livetin) is believed to be the causative antigen of bird–egg syndrome... Although IgE reactivity against Gal d 5 can be reduced 88% by heating, skin PPTs performed with both raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat were positive in our patient... However, since IgE binding to alpha-parvalbumin and myosin has been identified in turkey meat, we advised him not to eat turkey meat due to cross-reactivity... We have presented this case because of the rarity of allergy to chicken meat and because we wish to attract attention to chicken meat allergy without bird–egg syndrome.

No MeSH data available.


Skin prick tests with commercial allergenic extracts of chicken, egg white, egg yolk, feather mixture, skin prick-prick tests with raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat
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Figure 1: Skin prick tests with commercial allergenic extracts of chicken, egg white, egg yolk, feather mixture, skin prick-prick tests with raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat

Mentions: Laboratory results on admission: CBC with white blood cell differential was within normal range; serum total IgE was 351 IU/ml. Skin prick tests (SPTs) with commercial allergenic extracts of chicken (Alyostal Stallergenes, France), egg white, and egg yolk (ALK Abello, Denmark) were positive. SPT was negative for a feather mixture (Alyostal Stallergenes, France). Skin prick–prick tests (PPTs) were performed with raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat: they were all positive (Fig 1). Both SPTs with the same commercial allergenic extracts and PPTs with raw and cooked chicken meat were performed on four healthy, non-atopic adult volunteers, all resulting negative. The specific IgE serum level for chicken meat in our patient was 10.20 kU/L (Class III) (chemiluminescence immunoassay). An oral challenge test with chicken meat was not performed due to the risk of precipitating a severe reaction. The clinical history of our patient and the results of in vivo and in vitro tests were compatible with chicken meat allergy. We advised him not to consume any avian meats and prescribed an epinephrine autoinjector to use in case of anaphylactic emergency.


Chicken meat anaphylaxis in a child with no allergies to eggs or feathers.

Can C, Yazicioglu M, Ciplak G - Iran J Pediatr (2014)

Skin prick tests with commercial allergenic extracts of chicken, egg white, egg yolk, feather mixture, skin prick-prick tests with raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4442846&req=5

Figure 1: Skin prick tests with commercial allergenic extracts of chicken, egg white, egg yolk, feather mixture, skin prick-prick tests with raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat
Mentions: Laboratory results on admission: CBC with white blood cell differential was within normal range; serum total IgE was 351 IU/ml. Skin prick tests (SPTs) with commercial allergenic extracts of chicken (Alyostal Stallergenes, France), egg white, and egg yolk (ALK Abello, Denmark) were positive. SPT was negative for a feather mixture (Alyostal Stallergenes, France). Skin prick–prick tests (PPTs) were performed with raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat: they were all positive (Fig 1). Both SPTs with the same commercial allergenic extracts and PPTs with raw and cooked chicken meat were performed on four healthy, non-atopic adult volunteers, all resulting negative. The specific IgE serum level for chicken meat in our patient was 10.20 kU/L (Class III) (chemiluminescence immunoassay). An oral challenge test with chicken meat was not performed due to the risk of precipitating a severe reaction. The clinical history of our patient and the results of in vivo and in vitro tests were compatible with chicken meat allergy. We advised him not to consume any avian meats and prescribed an epinephrine autoinjector to use in case of anaphylactic emergency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Allergy.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

A fifteen-year-old male patient with a personal history of chicken meat allergy was referred to our clinic... His symptoms gradually resolved without admission to hospital... Subsequently, he did not consume any chicken meat until last year (2013), when he reported nasal itching and irritability while passing by restaurants serving chicken doner kebab... His physical examination was normal... Laboratory results on admission: CBC with white blood cell differential was within normal range; serum total IgE was 351 IU/ml... The clinical history of our patient and the results of in vivo and in vitro tests were compatible with chicken meat allergy... Our case represents the third reported case of chicken meat anaphylaxis in children with no allergies to eggs or feathers... In our patient, SPTs were found to be positive with commercial allergenic extracts of egg white, egg yolk, and chicken... Gal d 5 (alpha-livetin) is believed to be the causative antigen of bird–egg syndrome... Although IgE reactivity against Gal d 5 can be reduced 88% by heating, skin PPTs performed with both raw and cooked chicken and turkey meat were positive in our patient... However, since IgE binding to alpha-parvalbumin and myosin has been identified in turkey meat, we advised him not to eat turkey meat due to cross-reactivity... We have presented this case because of the rarity of allergy to chicken meat and because we wish to attract attention to chicken meat allergy without bird–egg syndrome.

No MeSH data available.