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Effect of Moxidectin Treatment at Peripartum on Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Ewes Raised under Tropical Andes High Altitude Conditions.

Vargas-Duarte JJ, Lozano-Márquez H, Grajales-Lombana HA, Manrique-Perdomo C, Martínez-Bello DA, Saegerman C, Raes M, Kirschvink N - Vet Med Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Significant FEC reductions were found in T 1 (94.8%) and T 2 (96.7%) ewes (p < 0.05).Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea) showed time- and treatment-related differences (p < 0.05).Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Genetic Institute, National University of Colombia, Carrera 30 No. 45-03, Edificio 426, Bogotá D.C., Colombia ; Unit of Integrated Veterinary Research, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Namur, rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
This study tested the impact of moxidectin at peripartum on nematode fecal egg count (FEC) and clinical parameters on ewes in the high altitude tropical Andes of Colombia. FEC and clinical evaluations were performed on 9 occasions in 43 naturally infected ewes before and during gestation and after lambing. Moxidectin (Mox, 200 µg kg(-1)) was applied at late pregnancy (T 1, n = 15) or 48 hours after parturition (T 2, n = 14). 14 untreated ewes served as controls (C). Suckling lambs (n = 58) remained untreated and underwent four clinical and parasitological evaluations until 8 weeks after birth. Mox efficacy equaled 99.3% (T 1) and 96.9% (T 2). Highest mean FEC value reflecting periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) was recorded in C ewes at 4-6 weeks after lambing. Significant FEC reductions were found in T 1 (94.8%) and T 2 (96.7%) ewes (p < 0.05). All lambs showed a significant and ewes-group independent increase in FEC before weaning (p < 0.05). Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea) showed time- and treatment-related differences (p < 0.05). Monitoring of FEC and clinical parameters linked to gastrointestinal parasite infections allowed demonstrating that postpartum or preweaning are two critical periods to nematode infection for sheep raised under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental design to describe periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) of ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and to measure the efficacy and persistency of peripartum strategic treatment with moxidectin (Mox) either at the onset of late pregnancy (TT1) or at the end of immediate peripartum (TT2) period under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Parasitological and clinical evaluations included FEC by McMaster test, anemia detection by FAMACHA© system, diarrhea assessment by Dag scoring, body weight, and body condition assessment. Fecal egg count reduction (FECR) was employed to test posttreatment moxidectin efficacy 15 days after treatment (PEMoxT1 and PEMoxT2), the prevention of PPER at late postpartum (PPERPre) period, and preweaning persistency (PWPer⁡). Ewes in control group (C) and offspring of all ewes were untreated against gastrointestinal nematodes. D: dry ewes; M: mating; MP: midpregnancy; LP: late pregnancy; Ipr: immediate postpartum; Epp: early postpartum; Ipp: intermediate postpartum; LPp: late postpartum; and PW: preweaning.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Experimental design to describe periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) of ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and to measure the efficacy and persistency of peripartum strategic treatment with moxidectin (Mox) either at the onset of late pregnancy (TT1) or at the end of immediate peripartum (TT2) period under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Parasitological and clinical evaluations included FEC by McMaster test, anemia detection by FAMACHA© system, diarrhea assessment by Dag scoring, body weight, and body condition assessment. Fecal egg count reduction (FECR) was employed to test posttreatment moxidectin efficacy 15 days after treatment (PEMoxT1 and PEMoxT2), the prevention of PPER at late postpartum (PPERPre) period, and preweaning persistency (PWPer⁡). Ewes in control group (C) and offspring of all ewes were untreated against gastrointestinal nematodes. D: dry ewes; M: mating; MP: midpregnancy; LP: late pregnancy; Ipr: immediate postpartum; Epp: early postpartum; Ipp: intermediate postpartum; LPp: late postpartum; and PW: preweaning.

Mentions: A longitudinal study was conducted during 40 weeks and included nine sampling periods where parasitological and clinical evaluations were performed in relation to ewe's reproductive state (Figure 1). The last anthelmintic treatment was applied more than four weeks before the beginning of the follow-up (fenbendazole; 10 mg·kg−1 once daily during three days). Ewes were investigated before breeding, around mating (natural reproduction with a mating period of 34 days), at midpregnancy (~80 days of pregnancy), at late pregnancy (7–29 days before lambing), at immediate peripartum (6 days before until 2 days after lambing), at early postpartum (2–15 days after lambing), at intermediate postpartum (15–30 days after lambing), at late postpartum (30–45 days after lambing), and at preweaning (46–60 days after lambing). Lambs were investigated since birth at the same time points as their dams. At late pregnancy, ewes were ranked on the basis of body weight, body score, and parasite infection burden and allocated into three groups. Ewes of group T1 (n = 15) received a single Mox (Cydectin, Fort Dodge Animal Health) subcutaneous injection of 200 μg kg−1 of body weight at late pregnancy (~135 days of gestation). Ewes of group T2 (n = 14) received a single Mox subcutaneous injection of 200 μg kg−1 body weight 2 days after lambing. Control ewes (C group, n = 14) remained untreated throughout the whole study. Five further fortnightly samplings were performed after lambing.


Effect of Moxidectin Treatment at Peripartum on Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Ewes Raised under Tropical Andes High Altitude Conditions.

Vargas-Duarte JJ, Lozano-Márquez H, Grajales-Lombana HA, Manrique-Perdomo C, Martínez-Bello DA, Saegerman C, Raes M, Kirschvink N - Vet Med Int (2015)

Experimental design to describe periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) of ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and to measure the efficacy and persistency of peripartum strategic treatment with moxidectin (Mox) either at the onset of late pregnancy (TT1) or at the end of immediate peripartum (TT2) period under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Parasitological and clinical evaluations included FEC by McMaster test, anemia detection by FAMACHA© system, diarrhea assessment by Dag scoring, body weight, and body condition assessment. Fecal egg count reduction (FECR) was employed to test posttreatment moxidectin efficacy 15 days after treatment (PEMoxT1 and PEMoxT2), the prevention of PPER at late postpartum (PPERPre) period, and preweaning persistency (PWPer⁡). Ewes in control group (C) and offspring of all ewes were untreated against gastrointestinal nematodes. D: dry ewes; M: mating; MP: midpregnancy; LP: late pregnancy; Ipr: immediate postpartum; Epp: early postpartum; Ipp: intermediate postpartum; LPp: late postpartum; and PW: preweaning.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4442306&req=5

fig1: Experimental design to describe periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) of ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and to measure the efficacy and persistency of peripartum strategic treatment with moxidectin (Mox) either at the onset of late pregnancy (TT1) or at the end of immediate peripartum (TT2) period under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Parasitological and clinical evaluations included FEC by McMaster test, anemia detection by FAMACHA© system, diarrhea assessment by Dag scoring, body weight, and body condition assessment. Fecal egg count reduction (FECR) was employed to test posttreatment moxidectin efficacy 15 days after treatment (PEMoxT1 and PEMoxT2), the prevention of PPER at late postpartum (PPERPre) period, and preweaning persistency (PWPer⁡). Ewes in control group (C) and offspring of all ewes were untreated against gastrointestinal nematodes. D: dry ewes; M: mating; MP: midpregnancy; LP: late pregnancy; Ipr: immediate postpartum; Epp: early postpartum; Ipp: intermediate postpartum; LPp: late postpartum; and PW: preweaning.
Mentions: A longitudinal study was conducted during 40 weeks and included nine sampling periods where parasitological and clinical evaluations were performed in relation to ewe's reproductive state (Figure 1). The last anthelmintic treatment was applied more than four weeks before the beginning of the follow-up (fenbendazole; 10 mg·kg−1 once daily during three days). Ewes were investigated before breeding, around mating (natural reproduction with a mating period of 34 days), at midpregnancy (~80 days of pregnancy), at late pregnancy (7–29 days before lambing), at immediate peripartum (6 days before until 2 days after lambing), at early postpartum (2–15 days after lambing), at intermediate postpartum (15–30 days after lambing), at late postpartum (30–45 days after lambing), and at preweaning (46–60 days after lambing). Lambs were investigated since birth at the same time points as their dams. At late pregnancy, ewes were ranked on the basis of body weight, body score, and parasite infection burden and allocated into three groups. Ewes of group T1 (n = 15) received a single Mox (Cydectin, Fort Dodge Animal Health) subcutaneous injection of 200 μg kg−1 of body weight at late pregnancy (~135 days of gestation). Ewes of group T2 (n = 14) received a single Mox subcutaneous injection of 200 μg kg−1 body weight 2 days after lambing. Control ewes (C group, n = 14) remained untreated throughout the whole study. Five further fortnightly samplings were performed after lambing.

Bottom Line: Significant FEC reductions were found in T 1 (94.8%) and T 2 (96.7%) ewes (p < 0.05).Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea) showed time- and treatment-related differences (p < 0.05).Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Genetic Institute, National University of Colombia, Carrera 30 No. 45-03, Edificio 426, Bogotá D.C., Colombia ; Unit of Integrated Veterinary Research, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Namur, rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
This study tested the impact of moxidectin at peripartum on nematode fecal egg count (FEC) and clinical parameters on ewes in the high altitude tropical Andes of Colombia. FEC and clinical evaluations were performed on 9 occasions in 43 naturally infected ewes before and during gestation and after lambing. Moxidectin (Mox, 200 µg kg(-1)) was applied at late pregnancy (T 1, n = 15) or 48 hours after parturition (T 2, n = 14). 14 untreated ewes served as controls (C). Suckling lambs (n = 58) remained untreated and underwent four clinical and parasitological evaluations until 8 weeks after birth. Mox efficacy equaled 99.3% (T 1) and 96.9% (T 2). Highest mean FEC value reflecting periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) was recorded in C ewes at 4-6 weeks after lambing. Significant FEC reductions were found in T 1 (94.8%) and T 2 (96.7%) ewes (p < 0.05). All lambs showed a significant and ewes-group independent increase in FEC before weaning (p < 0.05). Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea) showed time- and treatment-related differences (p < 0.05). Monitoring of FEC and clinical parameters linked to gastrointestinal parasite infections allowed demonstrating that postpartum or preweaning are two critical periods to nematode infection for sheep raised under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus