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Workload and management of childhood fever at general practice out-of-hours care: an observational cohort study.

de Bont EG, Lepot JM, Hendrix DA, Loonen N, Guldemond-Hecker Y, Dinant GJ, Cals JW - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: One in four consultations resulted in an antibiotic prescription.Prescriptions increased by age and referrals to secondary care decreased by age (p<0.001).One in four consultations for childhood fever results in antibiotic prescribing and most consultations are managed in primary care without referral.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart of all children <12 years contacting the general practitioner out-of-hours service.
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BMJOPEN2014007365F1: Flow chart of all children <12 years contacting the general practitioner out-of-hours service.

Mentions: In 2012, there were 78 514 contacts and 39 519 consultations in total for all age categories at the out-of-hours centre. Of these contacts, 17 170 were for children <12 years, of which 5343 (31.1%) were fever related (figure 1). Mean age was 2.8 years (SD±2.5 years). Gender and age distribution are presented in table 1. Most fever related contacts were for children aged 1–5 years (table 2). In 2012, there were on average 14.6 fever related contacts for children per day, with peaks in workload during the months of December to April (figure 2). Seventy per cent of all fever related contacts resulted in a GP consultation (figure 1). The most frequently used ICPC codes were A99.00 (general disease not specified; 74.3%), A03.00 (fever; 4.1%), H71.00 (acute otitis media; 4.2%) and R74.00 (upper respiratory infection acute; 4.8%).


Workload and management of childhood fever at general practice out-of-hours care: an observational cohort study.

de Bont EG, Lepot JM, Hendrix DA, Loonen N, Guldemond-Hecker Y, Dinant GJ, Cals JW - BMJ Open (2015)

Flow chart of all children <12 years contacting the general practitioner out-of-hours service.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4442146&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007365F1: Flow chart of all children <12 years contacting the general practitioner out-of-hours service.
Mentions: In 2012, there were 78 514 contacts and 39 519 consultations in total for all age categories at the out-of-hours centre. Of these contacts, 17 170 were for children <12 years, of which 5343 (31.1%) were fever related (figure 1). Mean age was 2.8 years (SD±2.5 years). Gender and age distribution are presented in table 1. Most fever related contacts were for children aged 1–5 years (table 2). In 2012, there were on average 14.6 fever related contacts for children per day, with peaks in workload during the months of December to April (figure 2). Seventy per cent of all fever related contacts resulted in a GP consultation (figure 1). The most frequently used ICPC codes were A99.00 (general disease not specified; 74.3%), A03.00 (fever; 4.1%), H71.00 (acute otitis media; 4.2%) and R74.00 (upper respiratory infection acute; 4.8%).

Bottom Line: One in four consultations resulted in an antibiotic prescription.Prescriptions increased by age and referrals to secondary care decreased by age (p<0.001).One in four consultations for childhood fever results in antibiotic prescribing and most consultations are managed in primary care without referral.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.