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Enhanced segregation of concurrent sounds with similar spectral uncertainties in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

Lin IF, Yamada T, Komine Y, Kato N, Kashino M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Their superior performance in this task indicates an enhanced discrimination between auditory streams with the same spectral uncertainties but different spectro-temporal details.The enhanced discrimination of acoustic components may be related to the absence of the automatic grouping of acoustic components with the same features, which results in difficulties in speech perception in a noisy environment.On the other hand, the ASD group and the control group had similar performance in hearing a target sequence among distractors that had different spatial cues defined by interaural intensity differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NTT Communication Science Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT
When acoustic signals from different sound sources are mixed upon arrival at the ears, the auditory system organizes these acoustic elements by their features. This study shows that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) performed better in terms of hearing a target sequence among distractors that had similar spectral uncertainties. Their superior performance in this task indicates an enhanced discrimination between auditory streams with the same spectral uncertainties but different spectro-temporal details. The enhanced discrimination of acoustic components may be related to the absence of the automatic grouping of acoustic components with the same features, which results in difficulties in speech perception in a noisy environment. On the other hand, the ASD group and the control group had similar performance in hearing a target sequence among distractors that had different spatial cues defined by interaural intensity differences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Target detection thresholds in the ASD and control groups for the four conditions, indicated as mean ± standard error. The maskers were sent to the right ear for the monotonic conditions or to both ears for the diotic conditions.
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f2: Target detection thresholds in the ASD and control groups for the four conditions, indicated as mean ± standard error. The maskers were sent to the right ear for the monotonic conditions or to both ears for the diotic conditions.

Mentions: The cross-subject thresholds in the ASD and control groups for the four conditions are shown in Fig. 2. To investigate whether target-masker similarities in spectral uncertainty and the difference between spatial cues influenced the ASD subjects and neurotypical (NT) subjects in the same way, a three-way mixed-design ANOVA, with the between-subject factor as Group (ASD and NT) and the within-subject factor as Spectral Uncertainty (jittered and non-jittered frequencies) and Spatial Cues (monotic and diotic), was performed for the averaged thresholds in each condition. The ANOVA analysis was conducted with SPSS v.19 (IBM, USA).


Enhanced segregation of concurrent sounds with similar spectral uncertainties in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

Lin IF, Yamada T, Komine Y, Kato N, Kashino M - Sci Rep (2015)

Target detection thresholds in the ASD and control groups for the four conditions, indicated as mean ± standard error. The maskers were sent to the right ear for the monotonic conditions or to both ears for the diotic conditions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4441195&req=5

f2: Target detection thresholds in the ASD and control groups for the four conditions, indicated as mean ± standard error. The maskers were sent to the right ear for the monotonic conditions or to both ears for the diotic conditions.
Mentions: The cross-subject thresholds in the ASD and control groups for the four conditions are shown in Fig. 2. To investigate whether target-masker similarities in spectral uncertainty and the difference between spatial cues influenced the ASD subjects and neurotypical (NT) subjects in the same way, a three-way mixed-design ANOVA, with the between-subject factor as Group (ASD and NT) and the within-subject factor as Spectral Uncertainty (jittered and non-jittered frequencies) and Spatial Cues (monotic and diotic), was performed for the averaged thresholds in each condition. The ANOVA analysis was conducted with SPSS v.19 (IBM, USA).

Bottom Line: Their superior performance in this task indicates an enhanced discrimination between auditory streams with the same spectral uncertainties but different spectro-temporal details.The enhanced discrimination of acoustic components may be related to the absence of the automatic grouping of acoustic components with the same features, which results in difficulties in speech perception in a noisy environment.On the other hand, the ASD group and the control group had similar performance in hearing a target sequence among distractors that had different spatial cues defined by interaural intensity differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NTT Communication Science Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT
When acoustic signals from different sound sources are mixed upon arrival at the ears, the auditory system organizes these acoustic elements by their features. This study shows that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) performed better in terms of hearing a target sequence among distractors that had similar spectral uncertainties. Their superior performance in this task indicates an enhanced discrimination between auditory streams with the same spectral uncertainties but different spectro-temporal details. The enhanced discrimination of acoustic components may be related to the absence of the automatic grouping of acoustic components with the same features, which results in difficulties in speech perception in a noisy environment. On the other hand, the ASD group and the control group had similar performance in hearing a target sequence among distractors that had different spatial cues defined by interaural intensity differences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus