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Caring for dying patients: attitude of nursing students and effects of education.

Jafari M, Rafiei H, Nassehi A, Soleimani F, Arab M, Noormohammadi MR - Indian J Palliat Care (2015 May-Aug)

Bottom Line: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude.Education has improved students' attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33) (P < 0.001).Further research recommended examining nursing students' knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude.

Materials and methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of Iran. The attitude of nursing students was measured using Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale before and after an educational intervention. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 18 software.

Results: Of 32 students, 30 participated in this study (response rate of 94%). Only 20% of the students reported previous experience of dying patients in their clinical courses. Students showed moderately negative to neutral attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Education has improved students' attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33) (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Educational programs about death and caring for dying patients should be added to undergraduate nursing curricula. Further research recommended examining nursing students' knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge.

No MeSH data available.


Five question that had less changes after intervention
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Figure 1: Five question that had less changes after intervention

Mentions: Mean score of FATCOD before education were 3.5 ± 0.43. The highest and lowest mean scores were related to item 21 “It is beneficial for the dying person to verbalize his/her feelings” and item 8 “I would be upset when the dying person I was caring for gave up hope of getting better,” respectively. The mean score of FATCOD after education was 4.7 ± 0.33. The highest and lowest mean scores were related to item 6 “The non-family caregivers should not be the one to talk about death with the dying person” and item 8 “I would be upset when the dying person I was caring for gave up hope of getting better,” respectively. Results showed that the mean score of FATCOD after receiving education increased compared to before receiving education, and this difference was statistically significant P < 0.001. Table 2 shows the mean score of FATCOD items before and after education. Figures 1 and 2 shows ten questions that have demonstrated significant changes after intervention.


Caring for dying patients: attitude of nursing students and effects of education.

Jafari M, Rafiei H, Nassehi A, Soleimani F, Arab M, Noormohammadi MR - Indian J Palliat Care (2015 May-Aug)

Five question that had less changes after intervention
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4441181&req=5

Figure 1: Five question that had less changes after intervention
Mentions: Mean score of FATCOD before education were 3.5 ± 0.43. The highest and lowest mean scores were related to item 21 “It is beneficial for the dying person to verbalize his/her feelings” and item 8 “I would be upset when the dying person I was caring for gave up hope of getting better,” respectively. The mean score of FATCOD after education was 4.7 ± 0.33. The highest and lowest mean scores were related to item 6 “The non-family caregivers should not be the one to talk about death with the dying person” and item 8 “I would be upset when the dying person I was caring for gave up hope of getting better,” respectively. Results showed that the mean score of FATCOD after receiving education increased compared to before receiving education, and this difference was statistically significant P < 0.001. Table 2 shows the mean score of FATCOD items before and after education. Figures 1 and 2 shows ten questions that have demonstrated significant changes after intervention.

Bottom Line: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude.Education has improved students' attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33) (P < 0.001).Further research recommended examining nursing students' knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Surgical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude.

Materials and methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of Iran. The attitude of nursing students was measured using Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale before and after an educational intervention. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 18 software.

Results: Of 32 students, 30 participated in this study (response rate of 94%). Only 20% of the students reported previous experience of dying patients in their clinical courses. Students showed moderately negative to neutral attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Education has improved students' attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33) (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Educational programs about death and caring for dying patients should be added to undergraduate nursing curricula. Further research recommended examining nursing students' knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge.

No MeSH data available.