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Exposure to environmental stressors result in increased viral load and further reduction of production parameters in pigs experimentally infected with PCV2b.

Patterson R, Nevel A, Diaz AV, Martineau HM, Demmers T, Browne C, Mavrommatis B, Werling D - Vet. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has been identified as the essential, but not sole, underlying infectious component for PCV-associated diseases (PCVAD).These stressors were identified recently as risk factors leading to the occurrence of severe PCVAD on a farm level.Furthermore, all stressors led to an increased viral load in serum and tissue as assessed by qPCR, although levels did not reach statistical significance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Veterinary College, Department of Pathology and Pathogen Biology, Hawkshead Lane, AL9 7TA, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean weekly mass of pigs infected with PCV2b for 8 weeks and subjected to different environmental stresses. Pigs were infected with PCV2b and subjected to high stocking density (SD), high temperatures (T) or both (SD T). Pigs were weighed weekly and the average weight for the pigs subjected to each condition was recorded. Significant different values were analysed by one-way ANOVA, with *p < 0.05.
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fig0005: Mean weekly mass of pigs infected with PCV2b for 8 weeks and subjected to different environmental stresses. Pigs were infected with PCV2b and subjected to high stocking density (SD), high temperatures (T) or both (SD T). Pigs were weighed weekly and the average weight for the pigs subjected to each condition was recorded. Significant different values were analysed by one-way ANOVA, with *p < 0.05.

Mentions: Each pig in the study was weighed weekly and the mass of feed consumed by pigs in each room throughout each week was recorded. The mean weekly mass (Fig. 1) and the mean average daily weight gain (ADG, Fig. 2) and feed conversion ratios (FCR, Table 1) were recorded for each room.


Exposure to environmental stressors result in increased viral load and further reduction of production parameters in pigs experimentally infected with PCV2b.

Patterson R, Nevel A, Diaz AV, Martineau HM, Demmers T, Browne C, Mavrommatis B, Werling D - Vet. Microbiol. (2015)

Mean weekly mass of pigs infected with PCV2b for 8 weeks and subjected to different environmental stresses. Pigs were infected with PCV2b and subjected to high stocking density (SD), high temperatures (T) or both (SD T). Pigs were weighed weekly and the average weight for the pigs subjected to each condition was recorded. Significant different values were analysed by one-way ANOVA, with *p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4441105&req=5

fig0005: Mean weekly mass of pigs infected with PCV2b for 8 weeks and subjected to different environmental stresses. Pigs were infected with PCV2b and subjected to high stocking density (SD), high temperatures (T) or both (SD T). Pigs were weighed weekly and the average weight for the pigs subjected to each condition was recorded. Significant different values were analysed by one-way ANOVA, with *p < 0.05.
Mentions: Each pig in the study was weighed weekly and the mass of feed consumed by pigs in each room throughout each week was recorded. The mean weekly mass (Fig. 1) and the mean average daily weight gain (ADG, Fig. 2) and feed conversion ratios (FCR, Table 1) were recorded for each room.

Bottom Line: Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has been identified as the essential, but not sole, underlying infectious component for PCV-associated diseases (PCVAD).These stressors were identified recently as risk factors leading to the occurrence of severe PCVAD on a farm level.Furthermore, all stressors led to an increased viral load in serum and tissue as assessed by qPCR, although levels did not reach statistical significance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Veterinary College, Department of Pathology and Pathogen Biology, Hawkshead Lane, AL9 7TA, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus