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Agreement and repeatability of vascular reactivity estimates based on a breath-hold task and a resting state scan.

Lipp I, Murphy K, Caseras X, Wise RG - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: Maps and regional vascular reactivity estimates showed high repeatability when the breath-hold task was used.Repeatability and variance explained by the CO2 trace regressor were lower for the resting state data based approach, which resulted in highly variable measures of vascular reactivity.We conclude that breath-hold based vascular reactivity estimations are more repeatable than resting-based estimates, and that there are limitations with replacing breath-hold scans by resting state scans for vascular reactivity assessment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC), School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK; MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Spatial repeatability dependent on how many cycles of breath-hold are included in the analysis. Data for the CO2 trace regressor are presented.
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f0025: Spatial repeatability dependent on how many cycles of breath-hold are included in the analysis. Data for the CO2 trace regressor are presented.

Mentions: Repeatability was calculated for the maps obtained using different numbers of breath-hold cycles included in analysis. The number of cycles significantly influences the ICCspatial values obtained (χ [5] = 39, p < .0001; see Fig. 5). Comparing subsequent numbers of cycles shows that implementing 2 cycles yields higher repeatability than 1 cycle (p = .0013), 3 higher repeatability than 2 (p = .0325), 4 higher repeatability than 3 (p = .0325), but there is no difference between 4 and 5 (p = .11), or five or six (p = .11), however, between four and six (p = .0075). Only the difference between 1 and 2, as well as 4 and 6 cycles survive correction for the number of comparisons (6).


Agreement and repeatability of vascular reactivity estimates based on a breath-hold task and a resting state scan.

Lipp I, Murphy K, Caseras X, Wise RG - Neuroimage (2015)

Spatial repeatability dependent on how many cycles of breath-hold are included in the analysis. Data for the CO2 trace regressor are presented.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4441043&req=5

f0025: Spatial repeatability dependent on how many cycles of breath-hold are included in the analysis. Data for the CO2 trace regressor are presented.
Mentions: Repeatability was calculated for the maps obtained using different numbers of breath-hold cycles included in analysis. The number of cycles significantly influences the ICCspatial values obtained (χ [5] = 39, p < .0001; see Fig. 5). Comparing subsequent numbers of cycles shows that implementing 2 cycles yields higher repeatability than 1 cycle (p = .0013), 3 higher repeatability than 2 (p = .0325), 4 higher repeatability than 3 (p = .0325), but there is no difference between 4 and 5 (p = .11), or five or six (p = .11), however, between four and six (p = .0075). Only the difference between 1 and 2, as well as 4 and 6 cycles survive correction for the number of comparisons (6).

Bottom Line: Maps and regional vascular reactivity estimates showed high repeatability when the breath-hold task was used.Repeatability and variance explained by the CO2 trace regressor were lower for the resting state data based approach, which resulted in highly variable measures of vascular reactivity.We conclude that breath-hold based vascular reactivity estimations are more repeatable than resting-based estimates, and that there are limitations with replacing breath-hold scans by resting state scans for vascular reactivity assessment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC), School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK; MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus