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Differences in perceptual latency estimated from judgments of temporal order, simultaneity and duration are inconsistent.

Linares D, Holcombe AO - Iperception (2014)

Bottom Line: Differences in perceptual latency (ΔL) for two stimuli, such as an auditory and a visual stimulus, can be estimated from temporal order judgments (TOJ) and simultaneity judgments (SJ), but previous research has found evidence that ΔL estimated from these tasks do not coincide.Here, using an auditory and a visual stimulus we confirmed this and further show that ΔL as estimated from duration judgments also does not coincide with ΔL estimated from TOJ or SJ.These inconsistencies suggest that each judgment is subject to different processes that bias ΔL in different ways: TOJ might be affected by sensory interactions, a bias associated with the method of single stimuli and an order difficulty bias; SJ by sensory interactions and an asymmetrical criterion bias; duration judgments by an order duration bias.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; e-mail: danilinares@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Differences in perceptual latency (ΔL) for two stimuli, such as an auditory and a visual stimulus, can be estimated from temporal order judgments (TOJ) and simultaneity judgments (SJ), but previous research has found evidence that ΔL estimated from these tasks do not coincide. Here, using an auditory and a visual stimulus we confirmed this and further show that ΔL as estimated from duration judgments also does not coincide with ΔL estimated from TOJ or SJ. These inconsistencies suggest that each judgment is subject to different processes that bias ΔL in different ways: TOJ might be affected by sensory interactions, a bias associated with the method of single stimuli and an order difficulty bias; SJ by sensory interactions and an asymmetrical criterion bias; duration judgments by an order duration bias.

No MeSH data available.


Replot of the estimated ΔLVA from Figures 1d, 2b and 3b.
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Figure 4: Replot of the estimated ΔLVA from Figures 1d, 2b and 3b.

Mentions: Figure 4 compares the ΔLVA estimated by the different methods for each observer. Just as previous studies have found (Love et al., 2013; van Eijk et al., 2008; Vatakis et al., 2008; but see Sanders et al., 2011), ΔLVA estimated from TOJ and SJ did not correlate across observers: r(5) = .078, p = .87, 95% CI = (−.81,.87). At the individual level, for four of the seven observers the estimated ΔLVA from TOJ and SJ were different as indicated by the non-overlap of the confidence intervals.


Differences in perceptual latency estimated from judgments of temporal order, simultaneity and duration are inconsistent.

Linares D, Holcombe AO - Iperception (2014)

Replot of the estimated ΔLVA from Figures 1d, 2b and 3b.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4441030&req=5

Figure 4: Replot of the estimated ΔLVA from Figures 1d, 2b and 3b.
Mentions: Figure 4 compares the ΔLVA estimated by the different methods for each observer. Just as previous studies have found (Love et al., 2013; van Eijk et al., 2008; Vatakis et al., 2008; but see Sanders et al., 2011), ΔLVA estimated from TOJ and SJ did not correlate across observers: r(5) = .078, p = .87, 95% CI = (−.81,.87). At the individual level, for four of the seven observers the estimated ΔLVA from TOJ and SJ were different as indicated by the non-overlap of the confidence intervals.

Bottom Line: Differences in perceptual latency (ΔL) for two stimuli, such as an auditory and a visual stimulus, can be estimated from temporal order judgments (TOJ) and simultaneity judgments (SJ), but previous research has found evidence that ΔL estimated from these tasks do not coincide.Here, using an auditory and a visual stimulus we confirmed this and further show that ΔL as estimated from duration judgments also does not coincide with ΔL estimated from TOJ or SJ.These inconsistencies suggest that each judgment is subject to different processes that bias ΔL in different ways: TOJ might be affected by sensory interactions, a bias associated with the method of single stimuli and an order difficulty bias; SJ by sensory interactions and an asymmetrical criterion bias; duration judgments by an order duration bias.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; e-mail: danilinares@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Differences in perceptual latency (ΔL) for two stimuli, such as an auditory and a visual stimulus, can be estimated from temporal order judgments (TOJ) and simultaneity judgments (SJ), but previous research has found evidence that ΔL estimated from these tasks do not coincide. Here, using an auditory and a visual stimulus we confirmed this and further show that ΔL as estimated from duration judgments also does not coincide with ΔL estimated from TOJ or SJ. These inconsistencies suggest that each judgment is subject to different processes that bias ΔL in different ways: TOJ might be affected by sensory interactions, a bias associated with the method of single stimuli and an order difficulty bias; SJ by sensory interactions and an asymmetrical criterion bias; duration judgments by an order duration bias.

No MeSH data available.