Limits...
Swirl Flow Bioreactor coupled with Cu-alginate beads: A system for the eradication of Coliform and Escherichia coli from biological effluents.

Atkinson S, Thomas SF, Goddard P, Bransgrove RM, Mason PT, Oak A, Bansode A, Patankar R, Gleason ZD, Sim MK, Whitesell A, Allen MJ - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: It is estimated that approximately 1.1 billion people globally drink unsafe water.We previously reported both a novel copper-alginate bead, which quickly reduces pathogen loading in waste streams and the incorporation of these beads into a novel swirl flow bioreactor (SFB), of low capital and running costs and of simple construction from commercially available plumbing pipes and fittings.However, the system was slightly less effective in reducing E. coli viability, with a MLRV of 1.80.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth, PL1 3DH, UK.

ABSTRACT
It is estimated that approximately 1.1 billion people globally drink unsafe water. We previously reported both a novel copper-alginate bead, which quickly reduces pathogen loading in waste streams and the incorporation of these beads into a novel swirl flow bioreactor (SFB), of low capital and running costs and of simple construction from commercially available plumbing pipes and fittings. The purpose of the present study was to trial this system for pathogen reduction in waste streams from an operating Dewats system in Hinjewadi, Pune, India and in both simulated and real waste streams in Seattle, Washington, USA. The trials in India, showed a complete inactivation of coliforms in the discharged effluent (Mean Log removal Value (MLRV) = 3.51), accompanied by a total inactivation of E. coli with a MLRV of 1.95. The secondary clarifier effluent also showed a 4.38 MLRV in viable coliforms during treatment. However, the system was slightly less effective in reducing E. coli viability, with a MLRV of 1.80. The trials in Seattle also demonstrated the efficacy of the system in the reduction of viable bacteria, with a LRV of 5.67 observed of viable Raoultella terrigena cells (100%).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Process flow diagram for Hinjewadi sewerage treatment plant.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440980&req=5

f1: Process flow diagram for Hinjewadi sewerage treatment plant.

Mentions: The Hinjewadi Dewats system consisted of a coarse solid separator, leading to an equalisation tank with subsequent aerobic treatment. The water was then further treated in a secondary clarifier, sent to a storage tank prior to discharge (Figure 1). The resulting effluent was of clean appearance with a pH of 7.2, and of a low suspended solid content and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) at 55 and 9 mg/L respectively (Table 1). The effluent from the secondary clarifier still contained some obvious suspended solids and brown discolouration (Table 1). The pH was slightly lower than the discharged effluent at 7.1 and the TSS and COD were 141 and 84 mg/L, respectively (Table 1); whereas, the effluent from the aeration tank was of a higher suspended solid (132 mg/L) and was of a dark brown colouration (Table 1). The equalisation and aeration tank produced a 54.4% and 36.4% reduction in COD and TSS, respectively, whilst the secondary clarifier produced a further reduction of 61% in COD and 89.3% in TSS.


Swirl Flow Bioreactor coupled with Cu-alginate beads: A system for the eradication of Coliform and Escherichia coli from biological effluents.

Atkinson S, Thomas SF, Goddard P, Bransgrove RM, Mason PT, Oak A, Bansode A, Patankar R, Gleason ZD, Sim MK, Whitesell A, Allen MJ - Sci Rep (2015)

Process flow diagram for Hinjewadi sewerage treatment plant.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440980&req=5

f1: Process flow diagram for Hinjewadi sewerage treatment plant.
Mentions: The Hinjewadi Dewats system consisted of a coarse solid separator, leading to an equalisation tank with subsequent aerobic treatment. The water was then further treated in a secondary clarifier, sent to a storage tank prior to discharge (Figure 1). The resulting effluent was of clean appearance with a pH of 7.2, and of a low suspended solid content and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) at 55 and 9 mg/L respectively (Table 1). The effluent from the secondary clarifier still contained some obvious suspended solids and brown discolouration (Table 1). The pH was slightly lower than the discharged effluent at 7.1 and the TSS and COD were 141 and 84 mg/L, respectively (Table 1); whereas, the effluent from the aeration tank was of a higher suspended solid (132 mg/L) and was of a dark brown colouration (Table 1). The equalisation and aeration tank produced a 54.4% and 36.4% reduction in COD and TSS, respectively, whilst the secondary clarifier produced a further reduction of 61% in COD and 89.3% in TSS.

Bottom Line: It is estimated that approximately 1.1 billion people globally drink unsafe water.We previously reported both a novel copper-alginate bead, which quickly reduces pathogen loading in waste streams and the incorporation of these beads into a novel swirl flow bioreactor (SFB), of low capital and running costs and of simple construction from commercially available plumbing pipes and fittings.However, the system was slightly less effective in reducing E. coli viability, with a MLRV of 1.80.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth, PL1 3DH, UK.

ABSTRACT
It is estimated that approximately 1.1 billion people globally drink unsafe water. We previously reported both a novel copper-alginate bead, which quickly reduces pathogen loading in waste streams and the incorporation of these beads into a novel swirl flow bioreactor (SFB), of low capital and running costs and of simple construction from commercially available plumbing pipes and fittings. The purpose of the present study was to trial this system for pathogen reduction in waste streams from an operating Dewats system in Hinjewadi, Pune, India and in both simulated and real waste streams in Seattle, Washington, USA. The trials in India, showed a complete inactivation of coliforms in the discharged effluent (Mean Log removal Value (MLRV) = 3.51), accompanied by a total inactivation of E. coli with a MLRV of 1.95. The secondary clarifier effluent also showed a 4.38 MLRV in viable coliforms during treatment. However, the system was slightly less effective in reducing E. coli viability, with a MLRV of 1.80. The trials in Seattle also demonstrated the efficacy of the system in the reduction of viable bacteria, with a LRV of 5.67 observed of viable Raoultella terrigena cells (100%).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus