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Pathology-MRI Correlation of Hepatocarcinogenesis: Recent Update.

Huh J, Kim KW, Kim J, Yu E - J Pathol Transl Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Understanding the important alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis as well as the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological features will be helpful for managing patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.Recent advances in MRI techniques, such as fat/iron quantification, diffusion-weighted images, and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, have greatly enhanced our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Understanding the important alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis as well as the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological features will be helpful for managing patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent advances in MRI techniques, such as fat/iron quantification, diffusion-weighted images, and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, have greatly enhanced our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Siderotic nodule. A 60-year-old patient with liver cirrhosis underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging. On in-phase images, there are many nodules with low signal intensity (arrowheads on the left), which are not clearly demonstrable on opposed-phase images (right). This signal drop of nodules on the in-phase image suggests that these nodules contain an iron component (so-called siderotic nodules).
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f6-jptm-49-3-218: Siderotic nodule. A 60-year-old patient with liver cirrhosis underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging. On in-phase images, there are many nodules with low signal intensity (arrowheads on the left), which are not clearly demonstrable on opposed-phase images (right). This signal drop of nodules on the in-phase image suggests that these nodules contain an iron component (so-called siderotic nodules).

Mentions: During hepatocarcinogenesis, iron may accumulate in low-grade DNs and in some high-grade DNs. These nodules containing an iron deposit are referred to as ‘siderotic nodules’ (Fig. 6). In hepatocytes of siderotic nodules, the iron-transporter system, such as the transferrin transporter, are upregulated [14]. However, as these nodules progress into HCCs, the iron-transportation system also alters, and iron utilization increases, thus causing iron deficiency in HCCs [15]. Therefore, with progression to HCC, iron usually decreases.


Pathology-MRI Correlation of Hepatocarcinogenesis: Recent Update.

Huh J, Kim KW, Kim J, Yu E - J Pathol Transl Med (2015)

Siderotic nodule. A 60-year-old patient with liver cirrhosis underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging. On in-phase images, there are many nodules with low signal intensity (arrowheads on the left), which are not clearly demonstrable on opposed-phase images (right). This signal drop of nodules on the in-phase image suggests that these nodules contain an iron component (so-called siderotic nodules).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440933&req=5

f6-jptm-49-3-218: Siderotic nodule. A 60-year-old patient with liver cirrhosis underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging. On in-phase images, there are many nodules with low signal intensity (arrowheads on the left), which are not clearly demonstrable on opposed-phase images (right). This signal drop of nodules on the in-phase image suggests that these nodules contain an iron component (so-called siderotic nodules).
Mentions: During hepatocarcinogenesis, iron may accumulate in low-grade DNs and in some high-grade DNs. These nodules containing an iron deposit are referred to as ‘siderotic nodules’ (Fig. 6). In hepatocytes of siderotic nodules, the iron-transporter system, such as the transferrin transporter, are upregulated [14]. However, as these nodules progress into HCCs, the iron-transportation system also alters, and iron utilization increases, thus causing iron deficiency in HCCs [15]. Therefore, with progression to HCC, iron usually decreases.

Bottom Line: Understanding the important alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis as well as the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological features will be helpful for managing patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.Recent advances in MRI techniques, such as fat/iron quantification, diffusion-weighted images, and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, have greatly enhanced our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Understanding the important alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis as well as the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological features will be helpful for managing patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent advances in MRI techniques, such as fat/iron quantification, diffusion-weighted images, and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, have greatly enhanced our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus