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Endophytic and epiphytic microbes as "sources" of bioactive agents.

Newman DJ, Cragg GM - Front Chem (2015)

Bottom Line: Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified.They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism.At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retired, Wayne, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified. They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism. At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease. This report will give examples from insects, plants, and marine invertebrates.

No MeSH data available.


Compounds from Microbe-Insect Association.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 5: Compounds from Microbe-Insect Association.

Mentions: The seminal work published on dentigerumycin (Figure 5; 23) by Oh and coworkers, demonstrated how fungus-growing ants and actinobacteria work together to produce a specific toxin that specifically eliminates specialized fungal parasites (Oh et al., 2009a). In 2001, the eubacterium Pseudonocardia sp., fungal isolates (used as a food source for these attine ants), and the parasitic fungus Escovopsis sp. were isolated from the nest of the ant Apterostigma dentigerum in Gamboa, Panama. The Pseudonocardia sp., isolated from the ant cuticle, was observed to strongly inhibit Escovopsis sp. from the same ant colony, while the fungal isolates were resistant to this bacterium.


Endophytic and epiphytic microbes as "sources" of bioactive agents.

Newman DJ, Cragg GM - Front Chem (2015)

Compounds from Microbe-Insect Association.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440917&req=5

Figure 5: Compounds from Microbe-Insect Association.
Mentions: The seminal work published on dentigerumycin (Figure 5; 23) by Oh and coworkers, demonstrated how fungus-growing ants and actinobacteria work together to produce a specific toxin that specifically eliminates specialized fungal parasites (Oh et al., 2009a). In 2001, the eubacterium Pseudonocardia sp., fungal isolates (used as a food source for these attine ants), and the parasitic fungus Escovopsis sp. were isolated from the nest of the ant Apterostigma dentigerum in Gamboa, Panama. The Pseudonocardia sp., isolated from the ant cuticle, was observed to strongly inhibit Escovopsis sp. from the same ant colony, while the fungal isolates were resistant to this bacterium.

Bottom Line: Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified.They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism.At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retired, Wayne, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified. They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism. At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease. This report will give examples from insects, plants, and marine invertebrates.

No MeSH data available.