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Endophytic and epiphytic microbes as "sources" of bioactive agents.

Newman DJ, Cragg GM - Front Chem (2015)

Bottom Line: Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified.They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism.At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retired, Wayne, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified. They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism. At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease. This report will give examples from insects, plants, and marine invertebrates.

No MeSH data available.


Compounds from Endophytic Fungi.
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Figure 2: Compounds from Endophytic Fungi.

Mentions: The relationship between fungal presence and swainsonine production was first published in 2003 (Braun et al., 2003) and very interestingly, the fungus, an Undifilum sp., was transferred by vertical transmission via the seed (Oldrup et al., 2010; Ralphs et al., 2011). Subsequently, in the last 3 years, three papers have been published that definitively prove that the compound swainsonine (Figure 2; 10), the active component of “locoweed,” is in fact produced by endophytic fungi isolated from the producing plant. The paper published by Cook et al. (2013) covered the production of the alkaloid from a fungal endophyte in the seeds of Ipomoea carnea, and the abolition of production by treatment of the seeds with a fungicide, but production of other metabolites such as the calystegnines was unaltered.


Endophytic and epiphytic microbes as "sources" of bioactive agents.

Newman DJ, Cragg GM - Front Chem (2015)

Compounds from Endophytic Fungi.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440917&req=5

Figure 2: Compounds from Endophytic Fungi.
Mentions: The relationship between fungal presence and swainsonine production was first published in 2003 (Braun et al., 2003) and very interestingly, the fungus, an Undifilum sp., was transferred by vertical transmission via the seed (Oldrup et al., 2010; Ralphs et al., 2011). Subsequently, in the last 3 years, three papers have been published that definitively prove that the compound swainsonine (Figure 2; 10), the active component of “locoweed,” is in fact produced by endophytic fungi isolated from the producing plant. The paper published by Cook et al. (2013) covered the production of the alkaloid from a fungal endophyte in the seeds of Ipomoea carnea, and the abolition of production by treatment of the seeds with a fungicide, but production of other metabolites such as the calystegnines was unaltered.

Bottom Line: Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified.They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism.At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Retired, Wayne, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Beginning with the report by Stierle and Strobel in 1993 on taxol((R)) production by an endophytic fungus (Stierle et al., 1993), it is possible that a number of the agents now used as leads to treatments of diseases in man, are not produced by the plant or invertebrate host from which they were first isolated and identified. They are probably the product of a microbe in, on or around the macroorganism. At times there is an intricate "dance" between a precursor produced by a microbe, and interactions within the macroorganism, or in certain cases, a fungus, that ends up with the production of a novel agent that has potential as a treatment for a human disease. This report will give examples from insects, plants, and marine invertebrates.

No MeSH data available.