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Pivotal roles of phyllosphere microorganisms at the interface between plant functioning and atmospheric trace gas dynamics.

Bringel F, Couée I - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Phyllosphere microbiota are related to original and specific processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and the atmosphere.Recent -omics studies have opened fascinating opportunities for characterizing the spatio-temporal structure of phyllosphere microbial communities in relation with structural, functional, and ecological properties of host plants, and with physico-chemical properties of the environment, such as climate dynamics and trace gas composition of the surrounding atmosphere.This review will analyze recent advances, especially those resulting from environmental genomics, and how this novel knowledge has revealed the extent of the ecosystemic impact of the phyllosphere at the interface between plants and atmosphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Genomics, and Microbiology, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS, UNISTRA UMR 7156 Strasbourg, France.

ABSTRACT
The phyllosphere, which lato sensu consists of the aerial parts of plants, and therefore primarily, of the set of photosynthetic leaves, is one of the most prevalent microbial habitats on earth. Phyllosphere microbiota are related to original and specific processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and the atmosphere. Recent -omics studies have opened fascinating opportunities for characterizing the spatio-temporal structure of phyllosphere microbial communities in relation with structural, functional, and ecological properties of host plants, and with physico-chemical properties of the environment, such as climate dynamics and trace gas composition of the surrounding atmosphere. This review will analyze recent advances, especially those resulting from environmental genomics, and how this novel knowledge has revealed the extent of the ecosystemic impact of the phyllosphere at the interface between plants and atmosphere. Highlights • The phyllosphere is one of the most prevalent microbial habitats on earth. • Phyllosphere microbiota colonize extreme, stressful, and changing environments. • Plants, phyllosphere microbiota and the atmosphere present a dynamic continuum. • Phyllosphere microbiota interact with the dynamics of volatile organic compounds and atmospheric trace gasses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Theoretical scenarios of the fate of phyllosphere-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Green and orange arrows respectively represent plant organic compound fluxes and VOCs fluxes generated from microbial epiphytes. (1) Free transfer through cuticle; (2) free transfer through cuticle and epiphytes; (3) interception by epiphytes via abiotic or metabolic processes with no VOC release; (4) biotransformation of plant VOCx by phyllospheric microbial metabolism resulting in emission of a microbial VOCy; (5) signaling by plant VOCs triggers the phyllosphere microbiota to produce a VOCy; (6) phyllosphere microbiota emit VOCs after exposure to plant non-volatile compounds. Similar scenarios involving endophytic microorganisms could also be envisaged.
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Figure 3: Theoretical scenarios of the fate of phyllosphere-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Green and orange arrows respectively represent plant organic compound fluxes and VOCs fluxes generated from microbial epiphytes. (1) Free transfer through cuticle; (2) free transfer through cuticle and epiphytes; (3) interception by epiphytes via abiotic or metabolic processes with no VOC release; (4) biotransformation of plant VOCx by phyllospheric microbial metabolism resulting in emission of a microbial VOCy; (5) signaling by plant VOCs triggers the phyllosphere microbiota to produce a VOCy; (6) phyllosphere microbiota emit VOCs after exposure to plant non-volatile compounds. Similar scenarios involving endophytic microorganisms could also be envisaged.

Mentions: Plants emit a great variety of VOCs that can promote or inhibit specific species and thus contribute to numerous biotic interactions and to the shaping of microbial communities. On the other hand, microbes can intercept or alter scent emissions by plants and subsequently plant signaling with other plants or animals (Shiojiri et al., 2006). Knowledge on plant surface microbiota can reveal the mechanisms that govern processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and plant-interacting organisms, or between plants, microorganisms, and the atmosphere (Figures 3 and 4), either in pristine environments, or in agricultural or anthropogenic environments.


Pivotal roles of phyllosphere microorganisms at the interface between plant functioning and atmospheric trace gas dynamics.

Bringel F, Couée I - Front Microbiol (2015)

Theoretical scenarios of the fate of phyllosphere-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Green and orange arrows respectively represent plant organic compound fluxes and VOCs fluxes generated from microbial epiphytes. (1) Free transfer through cuticle; (2) free transfer through cuticle and epiphytes; (3) interception by epiphytes via abiotic or metabolic processes with no VOC release; (4) biotransformation of plant VOCx by phyllospheric microbial metabolism resulting in emission of a microbial VOCy; (5) signaling by plant VOCs triggers the phyllosphere microbiota to produce a VOCy; (6) phyllosphere microbiota emit VOCs after exposure to plant non-volatile compounds. Similar scenarios involving endophytic microorganisms could also be envisaged.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440916&req=5

Figure 3: Theoretical scenarios of the fate of phyllosphere-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Green and orange arrows respectively represent plant organic compound fluxes and VOCs fluxes generated from microbial epiphytes. (1) Free transfer through cuticle; (2) free transfer through cuticle and epiphytes; (3) interception by epiphytes via abiotic or metabolic processes with no VOC release; (4) biotransformation of plant VOCx by phyllospheric microbial metabolism resulting in emission of a microbial VOCy; (5) signaling by plant VOCs triggers the phyllosphere microbiota to produce a VOCy; (6) phyllosphere microbiota emit VOCs after exposure to plant non-volatile compounds. Similar scenarios involving endophytic microorganisms could also be envisaged.
Mentions: Plants emit a great variety of VOCs that can promote or inhibit specific species and thus contribute to numerous biotic interactions and to the shaping of microbial communities. On the other hand, microbes can intercept or alter scent emissions by plants and subsequently plant signaling with other plants or animals (Shiojiri et al., 2006). Knowledge on plant surface microbiota can reveal the mechanisms that govern processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and plant-interacting organisms, or between plants, microorganisms, and the atmosphere (Figures 3 and 4), either in pristine environments, or in agricultural or anthropogenic environments.

Bottom Line: Phyllosphere microbiota are related to original and specific processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and the atmosphere.Recent -omics studies have opened fascinating opportunities for characterizing the spatio-temporal structure of phyllosphere microbial communities in relation with structural, functional, and ecological properties of host plants, and with physico-chemical properties of the environment, such as climate dynamics and trace gas composition of the surrounding atmosphere.This review will analyze recent advances, especially those resulting from environmental genomics, and how this novel knowledge has revealed the extent of the ecosystemic impact of the phyllosphere at the interface between plants and atmosphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Genomics, and Microbiology, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS, UNISTRA UMR 7156 Strasbourg, France.

ABSTRACT
The phyllosphere, which lato sensu consists of the aerial parts of plants, and therefore primarily, of the set of photosynthetic leaves, is one of the most prevalent microbial habitats on earth. Phyllosphere microbiota are related to original and specific processes at the interface between plants, microorganisms and the atmosphere. Recent -omics studies have opened fascinating opportunities for characterizing the spatio-temporal structure of phyllosphere microbial communities in relation with structural, functional, and ecological properties of host plants, and with physico-chemical properties of the environment, such as climate dynamics and trace gas composition of the surrounding atmosphere. This review will analyze recent advances, especially those resulting from environmental genomics, and how this novel knowledge has revealed the extent of the ecosystemic impact of the phyllosphere at the interface between plants and atmosphere. Highlights • The phyllosphere is one of the most prevalent microbial habitats on earth. • Phyllosphere microbiota colonize extreme, stressful, and changing environments. • Plants, phyllosphere microbiota and the atmosphere present a dynamic continuum. • Phyllosphere microbiota interact with the dynamics of volatile organic compounds and atmospheric trace gasses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus