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Polarity correspondence effect between loudness and lateralized response set.

Chang S, Cho YS - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect.In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not.The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Human Performance, Department of Psychology, Korea University Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect. The current study examined whether polarity codes are formed in terms of the variation in loudness. In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not. In Experiments 3 and 4, in which the identical loudness- and timbre-judgment tasks were conducted while the auditory stimulus was presented only to the left or right ear, the correspondence effect was modulated by the ear to which the stimulus was presented, even though the effect was marginally significant in Experiment 4. The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean RTs as a function of loudness-response mapping and stimulation position in Experiment 3 are shown along with their SE.
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Figure 5: Mean RTs as a function of loudness-response mapping and stimulation position in Experiment 3 are shown along with their SE.

Mentions: The main effect of loudness was significant, F(1,15) = 4.59, p = 0.0490, MSE = 1,067, = 0.69. The mean RT was shorter for high-level loudness tones (M = 358 ms) than low-level loudness tones (M = 371 ms). The main effect of stimulation position was also significant, F(1,15) = 4.76, p = 0.0454, MSE = 130, = 0.22. When the sound was heard from the left ear, the mean RT was shorter (M = 362 ms) than from the right ear (M = 367 ms). Furthermore, the interaction between response side and stimulation position was significant, F(1,15) = 117.99, p < 0.0001, MSE = 352, = 0.95, reflecting the auditory Simon effect. The mean RTs were shorter when the sound and response locations corresponded (M = 346 ms) when they did not (M = 382 ms). The interaction between loudness and response side did not reach significance, F(1,15) < 1.0. However, of importance, the interactions of loudness, response side, and stimulation position were significant, F(1,15) = 12.36, p = 0.0031, MSE = 144, = 0.45, indicating that the correspondence effect between loudness and response side was found as a function of stimulation position (see Figure 5). When the sound was given to the right ear, a 9-ms loud-right/soft-left advantage was obtained, F(1,15) = 1.27, p = 0.2766, MSE = 936. On the other hand, when the sound was provided to the left ear, a 6-ms loud-left/soft-right advantage was obtained, F(1,15) < 1.0.


Polarity correspondence effect between loudness and lateralized response set.

Chang S, Cho YS - Front Psychol (2015)

Mean RTs as a function of loudness-response mapping and stimulation position in Experiment 3 are shown along with their SE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440908&req=5

Figure 5: Mean RTs as a function of loudness-response mapping and stimulation position in Experiment 3 are shown along with their SE.
Mentions: The main effect of loudness was significant, F(1,15) = 4.59, p = 0.0490, MSE = 1,067, = 0.69. The mean RT was shorter for high-level loudness tones (M = 358 ms) than low-level loudness tones (M = 371 ms). The main effect of stimulation position was also significant, F(1,15) = 4.76, p = 0.0454, MSE = 130, = 0.22. When the sound was heard from the left ear, the mean RT was shorter (M = 362 ms) than from the right ear (M = 367 ms). Furthermore, the interaction between response side and stimulation position was significant, F(1,15) = 117.99, p < 0.0001, MSE = 352, = 0.95, reflecting the auditory Simon effect. The mean RTs were shorter when the sound and response locations corresponded (M = 346 ms) when they did not (M = 382 ms). The interaction between loudness and response side did not reach significance, F(1,15) < 1.0. However, of importance, the interactions of loudness, response side, and stimulation position were significant, F(1,15) = 12.36, p = 0.0031, MSE = 144, = 0.45, indicating that the correspondence effect between loudness and response side was found as a function of stimulation position (see Figure 5). When the sound was given to the right ear, a 9-ms loud-right/soft-left advantage was obtained, F(1,15) = 1.27, p = 0.2766, MSE = 936. On the other hand, when the sound was provided to the left ear, a 6-ms loud-left/soft-right advantage was obtained, F(1,15) < 1.0.

Bottom Line: Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect.In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not.The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Human Performance, Department of Psychology, Korea University Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect. The current study examined whether polarity codes are formed in terms of the variation in loudness. In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not. In Experiments 3 and 4, in which the identical loudness- and timbre-judgment tasks were conducted while the auditory stimulus was presented only to the left or right ear, the correspondence effect was modulated by the ear to which the stimulus was presented, even though the effect was marginally significant in Experiment 4. The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus