Limits...
Influenza a virus on oceanic islands: host and viral diversity in seabirds in the Western Indian ocean.

Lebarbenchon C, Jaeger A, Feare C, Bastien M, Dietrich M, Larose C, Lagadec E, Rocamora G, Shah N, Pascalis H, Boulinier T, Le Corre M, Stallknecht DE, Dellagi K - PLoS Pathog. (2015)

Bottom Line: On oceanic islands, the ecology of IAV could be affected by the relative diversity, abundance and density of seabirds and ducks.Seabirds are the most abundant and widespread avifauna in the Western Indian Ocean and, in this region, oceanic islands represent major breeding sites for a large diversity of potential IAV host species.We also identified strong species-associated variation in virus exposure that may be associated to differences in the ecology and behaviour of terns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GIS CRVOI (Centre de Recherche et de Veille sur les maladies émergentes dans l'Océan Indien), Sainte Clotilde, Reunion Island; Université de La Réunion, UMR PIMIT (Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical), INSERM 1187, CNRS 9192, IRD 249, Saint Denis, Reunion Island.

ABSTRACT
Ducks and seabirds are natural hosts for influenza A viruses (IAV). On oceanic islands, the ecology of IAV could be affected by the relative diversity, abundance and density of seabirds and ducks. Seabirds are the most abundant and widespread avifauna in the Western Indian Ocean and, in this region, oceanic islands represent major breeding sites for a large diversity of potential IAV host species. Based on serological assays, we assessed the host range of IAV and the virus subtype diversity in terns of the islands of the Western Indian Ocean. We further investigated the spatial variation in virus transmission patterns between islands and identified the origin of circulating viruses using a molecular approach. Our findings indicate that terns represent a major host for IAV on oceanic islands, not only for seabird-related virus subtypes such as H16, but also for those commonly isolated in wild and domestic ducks (H3, H6, H9, H12 subtypes). We also identified strong species-associated variation in virus exposure that may be associated to differences in the ecology and behaviour of terns. We discuss the role of tern migrations in the spread of viruses to and between oceanic islands, in particular for the H2 and H9 IAV subtypes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sampling locations (red circles).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440776&req=5

ppat.1004925.g001: Sampling locations (red circles).

Mentions: We focused on seven islands of the Western Indian Ocean (Fig 1): Aride (4°12'S, 55°39'E), Bird (3°43'S, 55°12'E), Cousin (4°19'S, 55°39'E), Europa (22°21'S, 40°21'E), Juan de Nova (17°03'S, 42°45'E), Reunion (21°22'S, 55°34'E), and Tromelin (15°53'S, 54°31'E). On these islands, seabird communities are highly heterogeneous in term of species richness, population size and density (S1 Table). To take into account this heterogeneity, our sampling strategy was designed to provide representative numbers of samples as a function of colony size and to include a maximum number of species on each island. For instance, eight seabird species breed on Europa, with population size ranging from ten to hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs (S1 Table; [15]). On this island, five of the eight breeding species were sampled and sample size was adjusted to be representative of the population size of each species (S2 Table). This sampling strategy was modified as needed related to local geographic, safety and ethical constraints that restrict access to bird colonies, such as in highly mountainous regions (e.g. on Reunion Island) or for species highly sensitive to human disturbance (e.g. frigatebirds).


Influenza a virus on oceanic islands: host and viral diversity in seabirds in the Western Indian ocean.

Lebarbenchon C, Jaeger A, Feare C, Bastien M, Dietrich M, Larose C, Lagadec E, Rocamora G, Shah N, Pascalis H, Boulinier T, Le Corre M, Stallknecht DE, Dellagi K - PLoS Pathog. (2015)

Sampling locations (red circles).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440776&req=5

ppat.1004925.g001: Sampling locations (red circles).
Mentions: We focused on seven islands of the Western Indian Ocean (Fig 1): Aride (4°12'S, 55°39'E), Bird (3°43'S, 55°12'E), Cousin (4°19'S, 55°39'E), Europa (22°21'S, 40°21'E), Juan de Nova (17°03'S, 42°45'E), Reunion (21°22'S, 55°34'E), and Tromelin (15°53'S, 54°31'E). On these islands, seabird communities are highly heterogeneous in term of species richness, population size and density (S1 Table). To take into account this heterogeneity, our sampling strategy was designed to provide representative numbers of samples as a function of colony size and to include a maximum number of species on each island. For instance, eight seabird species breed on Europa, with population size ranging from ten to hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs (S1 Table; [15]). On this island, five of the eight breeding species were sampled and sample size was adjusted to be representative of the population size of each species (S2 Table). This sampling strategy was modified as needed related to local geographic, safety and ethical constraints that restrict access to bird colonies, such as in highly mountainous regions (e.g. on Reunion Island) or for species highly sensitive to human disturbance (e.g. frigatebirds).

Bottom Line: On oceanic islands, the ecology of IAV could be affected by the relative diversity, abundance and density of seabirds and ducks.Seabirds are the most abundant and widespread avifauna in the Western Indian Ocean and, in this region, oceanic islands represent major breeding sites for a large diversity of potential IAV host species.We also identified strong species-associated variation in virus exposure that may be associated to differences in the ecology and behaviour of terns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GIS CRVOI (Centre de Recherche et de Veille sur les maladies émergentes dans l'Océan Indien), Sainte Clotilde, Reunion Island; Université de La Réunion, UMR PIMIT (Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical), INSERM 1187, CNRS 9192, IRD 249, Saint Denis, Reunion Island.

ABSTRACT
Ducks and seabirds are natural hosts for influenza A viruses (IAV). On oceanic islands, the ecology of IAV could be affected by the relative diversity, abundance and density of seabirds and ducks. Seabirds are the most abundant and widespread avifauna in the Western Indian Ocean and, in this region, oceanic islands represent major breeding sites for a large diversity of potential IAV host species. Based on serological assays, we assessed the host range of IAV and the virus subtype diversity in terns of the islands of the Western Indian Ocean. We further investigated the spatial variation in virus transmission patterns between islands and identified the origin of circulating viruses using a molecular approach. Our findings indicate that terns represent a major host for IAV on oceanic islands, not only for seabird-related virus subtypes such as H16, but also for those commonly isolated in wild and domestic ducks (H3, H6, H9, H12 subtypes). We also identified strong species-associated variation in virus exposure that may be associated to differences in the ecology and behaviour of terns. We discuss the role of tern migrations in the spread of viruses to and between oceanic islands, in particular for the H2 and H9 IAV subtypes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus