Limits...
Where Do Ethno-Linguistic Groups Meet? How Copresence during Free-Time Is Related to Copresence at Home and at Work.

Toomet O, Silm S, Saluveer E, Ahas R, Tammaru T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The study is based on cellphone data for a medium-sized linguistically divided European city (Tallinn, Estonia), where the Estonian majority and mainly Russian-speaking minority populations are of roughly equal size.The results show that both places of residence and work are segregated, while other activities occur in a far more integrated environment.Copresence during free-time is positively associated with copresence at place of residence and work, however, the relationship is very weak.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia; Department of Geography, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

ABSTRACT
This paper analyzes ethnic segregation across the whole activity space-at place of residence, place of work, and during free-time. We focus on interethnic meeting potential during free-time, measured as copresence, and its relationship to copresence at place of residence and work. The study is based on cellphone data for a medium-sized linguistically divided European city (Tallinn, Estonia), where the Estonian majority and mainly Russian-speaking minority populations are of roughly equal size. The results show that both places of residence and work are segregated, while other activities occur in a far more integrated environment. Copresence during free-time is positively associated with copresence at place of residence and work, however, the relationship is very weak.

No MeSH data available.


Estonian-Russian Copresence during free–time by city tract.The study area, Tallinn city, is shaded and tract boundaries are marked in dark gray. Copresence is measured in number of meetings in the sample over the observation period (∑j < i∑ipij in the sense of expression Eq (1)).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440775&req=5

pone.0126093.g001: Estonian-Russian Copresence during free–time by city tract.The study area, Tallinn city, is shaded and tract boundaries are marked in dark gray. Copresence is measured in number of meetings in the sample over the observation period (∑j < i∑ipij in the sense of expression Eq (1)).

Mentions: The data cover the year 2009 and our sample contains individuals who are at least 18 years-old, and whose permanent place of residence in 2009 was in Tallinn based on our calculations. The sample is based on the distribution of Estonian-speaking and Russian-speaking residents in city tracts as in 2000 census. The tracts are defined based on the housing type and main roads to ensure their well-connected and relatively homogeneous structure. There are 25 tracts in Tallinn, see map in Fig 1. The sample includes 5,200 people, selected from the all available data with valid language and place-of-residence information in a way to preserve the census 2000 population proportions across the tracts and ethnic groups. The main factor determining the sample size was the low number of Russian-speakers with valid data in some smaller tracts. The number of calls are not significantly different between Estonian and Russian-speakers.


Where Do Ethno-Linguistic Groups Meet? How Copresence during Free-Time Is Related to Copresence at Home and at Work.

Toomet O, Silm S, Saluveer E, Ahas R, Tammaru T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Estonian-Russian Copresence during free–time by city tract.The study area, Tallinn city, is shaded and tract boundaries are marked in dark gray. Copresence is measured in number of meetings in the sample over the observation period (∑j < i∑ipij in the sense of expression Eq (1)).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440775&req=5

pone.0126093.g001: Estonian-Russian Copresence during free–time by city tract.The study area, Tallinn city, is shaded and tract boundaries are marked in dark gray. Copresence is measured in number of meetings in the sample over the observation period (∑j < i∑ipij in the sense of expression Eq (1)).
Mentions: The data cover the year 2009 and our sample contains individuals who are at least 18 years-old, and whose permanent place of residence in 2009 was in Tallinn based on our calculations. The sample is based on the distribution of Estonian-speaking and Russian-speaking residents in city tracts as in 2000 census. The tracts are defined based on the housing type and main roads to ensure their well-connected and relatively homogeneous structure. There are 25 tracts in Tallinn, see map in Fig 1. The sample includes 5,200 people, selected from the all available data with valid language and place-of-residence information in a way to preserve the census 2000 population proportions across the tracts and ethnic groups. The main factor determining the sample size was the low number of Russian-speakers with valid data in some smaller tracts. The number of calls are not significantly different between Estonian and Russian-speakers.

Bottom Line: The study is based on cellphone data for a medium-sized linguistically divided European city (Tallinn, Estonia), where the Estonian majority and mainly Russian-speaking minority populations are of roughly equal size.The results show that both places of residence and work are segregated, while other activities occur in a far more integrated environment.Copresence during free-time is positively associated with copresence at place of residence and work, however, the relationship is very weak.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia; Department of Geography, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

ABSTRACT
This paper analyzes ethnic segregation across the whole activity space-at place of residence, place of work, and during free-time. We focus on interethnic meeting potential during free-time, measured as copresence, and its relationship to copresence at place of residence and work. The study is based on cellphone data for a medium-sized linguistically divided European city (Tallinn, Estonia), where the Estonian majority and mainly Russian-speaking minority populations are of roughly equal size. The results show that both places of residence and work are segregated, while other activities occur in a far more integrated environment. Copresence during free-time is positively associated with copresence at place of residence and work, however, the relationship is very weak.

No MeSH data available.