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Capturing the temporal sequence of interaction in young siblings.

Perlman M, Lyons-Amos M, Leckie G, Steele F, Jenkins J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns.Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature.The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Development and Applied Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We explored whether young children exhibit subtypes of behavioral sequences during sibling interaction. Ten-minute, free-play observations of over 300 sibling dyads were coded for positivity, negativity and disengagement. The data were analyzed using growth mixture modeling (GMM). Younger (18-month-old) children's temporal behavioral sequences showed a harmonious (53%) and a casual (47%) class. Older (approximately four-year-old) children's behavior was more differentiated revealing a harmonious (25%), a deteriorating (31%), a recovery (22%) and a casual (22%) class. A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns. Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature. The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

No MeSH data available.


Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the 4-class model for older children (A) and Class 2 of the rejected 3-class model for older siblings (B).
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pone.0126353.g002: Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the 4-class model for older children (A) and Class 2 of the rejected 3-class model for older siblings (B).

Mentions: Model fit statistics for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 class models are provided in Table 1. The fit statistics suggest that we choose between a 3 and 4 class model. The BIC is lowest for the 3-class model. The LMR LRT, however, suggests we cannot reject two classes in favour of three classes (p = 0.249), but we come close to rejecting three classes in favour of four classes (p = 0.064). Thus the BIC suggests a 3-class model whereas the LMR LRT suggests that a fourth class may provide a significantly better fit. Although the statistical criteria suggest that there are discrete temporal behavioral sequences of child behavior, they do not agree conclusively on the number of discrete classes to best represent the data. In the 3-class model for older siblings we see a group that combines two processes hypothesized in the introduction: harmonious and deteriorating interaction (increased negativity). This combined class is presented in Fig 2. In the 4-class model this class split into two, revealing a harmonious group and a deteriorating interaction group. As the fit statistics were ambiguous between the 3- and 4-class models and because we had hypothesized that these two processes would represent separate classes we opted for the 4-class solution.


Capturing the temporal sequence of interaction in young siblings.

Perlman M, Lyons-Amos M, Leckie G, Steele F, Jenkins J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the 4-class model for older children (A) and Class 2 of the rejected 3-class model for older siblings (B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440720&req=5

pone.0126353.g002: Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the 4-class model for older children (A) and Class 2 of the rejected 3-class model for older siblings (B).
Mentions: Model fit statistics for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 class models are provided in Table 1. The fit statistics suggest that we choose between a 3 and 4 class model. The BIC is lowest for the 3-class model. The LMR LRT, however, suggests we cannot reject two classes in favour of three classes (p = 0.249), but we come close to rejecting three classes in favour of four classes (p = 0.064). Thus the BIC suggests a 3-class model whereas the LMR LRT suggests that a fourth class may provide a significantly better fit. Although the statistical criteria suggest that there are discrete temporal behavioral sequences of child behavior, they do not agree conclusively on the number of discrete classes to best represent the data. In the 3-class model for older siblings we see a group that combines two processes hypothesized in the introduction: harmonious and deteriorating interaction (increased negativity). This combined class is presented in Fig 2. In the 4-class model this class split into two, revealing a harmonious group and a deteriorating interaction group. As the fit statistics were ambiguous between the 3- and 4-class models and because we had hypothesized that these two processes would represent separate classes we opted for the 4-class solution.

Bottom Line: A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns.Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature.The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Development and Applied Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We explored whether young children exhibit subtypes of behavioral sequences during sibling interaction. Ten-minute, free-play observations of over 300 sibling dyads were coded for positivity, negativity and disengagement. The data were analyzed using growth mixture modeling (GMM). Younger (18-month-old) children's temporal behavioral sequences showed a harmonious (53%) and a casual (47%) class. Older (approximately four-year-old) children's behavior was more differentiated revealing a harmonious (25%), a deteriorating (31%), a recovery (22%) and a casual (22%) class. A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns. Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature. The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

No MeSH data available.