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Capturing the temporal sequence of interaction in young siblings.

Perlman M, Lyons-Amos M, Leckie G, Steele F, Jenkins J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns.Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature.The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Development and Applied Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We explored whether young children exhibit subtypes of behavioral sequences during sibling interaction. Ten-minute, free-play observations of over 300 sibling dyads were coded for positivity, negativity and disengagement. The data were analyzed using growth mixture modeling (GMM). Younger (18-month-old) children's temporal behavioral sequences showed a harmonious (53%) and a casual (47%) class. Older (approximately four-year-old) children's behavior was more differentiated revealing a harmonious (25%), a deteriorating (31%), a recovery (22%) and a casual (22%) class. A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns. Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature. The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

No MeSH data available.


Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the accepted 2-class model (A) and the third class from the rejected 3-class model (B) for younger children.
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pone.0126353.g001: Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the accepted 2-class model (A) and the third class from the rejected 3-class model (B) for younger children.

Mentions: Readers not familiar with the statistical techniques may find it most helpful to refer to the plots given in Fig 1A and 1B. These show the typologies of temporal behavioral sequences that were identified, separately for the younger and older children. Time is on the x-axis. The lines can be understood as depictions of the likelihood of children showing positivity, negativity or disengagement within the 20-second snapshot. We named these typologies based on the pattern seen for positivity, negativity and disengagement. The temporal behavioral sequences plots for the 2-class model for younger siblings (Fig 1A) show that children in class 1 (53% of children) have a high probability of positivity and low probabilities of negativity and disengagement with little change over time. (See Table A1 in S1 File for the estimated coefficients of the quadratic functions that generated these plots). We call this class the harmonious group. Children in class 2 (47%) have a slightly lower but still stable probability of positivity. However, as interaction proceeds for children in class 2, the probability of negativity declines while the probability of disengagement increases substantially. We refer to this expected class as the casual group.


Capturing the temporal sequence of interaction in young siblings.

Perlman M, Lyons-Amos M, Leckie G, Steele F, Jenkins J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the accepted 2-class model (A) and the third class from the rejected 3-class model (B) for younger children.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440720&req=5

pone.0126353.g001: Average predicted probability of temporal behavioral sequences from the accepted 2-class model (A) and the third class from the rejected 3-class model (B) for younger children.
Mentions: Readers not familiar with the statistical techniques may find it most helpful to refer to the plots given in Fig 1A and 1B. These show the typologies of temporal behavioral sequences that were identified, separately for the younger and older children. Time is on the x-axis. The lines can be understood as depictions of the likelihood of children showing positivity, negativity or disengagement within the 20-second snapshot. We named these typologies based on the pattern seen for positivity, negativity and disengagement. The temporal behavioral sequences plots for the 2-class model for younger siblings (Fig 1A) show that children in class 1 (53% of children) have a high probability of positivity and low probabilities of negativity and disengagement with little change over time. (See Table A1 in S1 File for the estimated coefficients of the quadratic functions that generated these plots). We call this class the harmonious group. Children in class 2 (47%) have a slightly lower but still stable probability of positivity. However, as interaction proceeds for children in class 2, the probability of negativity declines while the probability of disengagement increases substantially. We refer to this expected class as the casual group.

Bottom Line: A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns.Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature.The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Development and Applied Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We explored whether young children exhibit subtypes of behavioral sequences during sibling interaction. Ten-minute, free-play observations of over 300 sibling dyads were coded for positivity, negativity and disengagement. The data were analyzed using growth mixture modeling (GMM). Younger (18-month-old) children's temporal behavioral sequences showed a harmonious (53%) and a casual (47%) class. Older (approximately four-year-old) children's behavior was more differentiated revealing a harmonious (25%), a deteriorating (31%), a recovery (22%) and a casual (22%) class. A more positive maternal affective climate was associated with more positive patterns. Siblings' sequential behavioral patterns tended to be complementary rather than reciprocal in nature. The study illustrates a novel use of GMM and makes a theoretical contribution by showing that young children exhibit distinct types of temporal behavioral sequences that are related to parenting processes.

No MeSH data available.