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Tuberculosis among migrant populations in the European Union and the European Economic Area.

Odone A, Tillmann T, Sandgren A, Williams G, Rechel B, Ingleby D, Noori T, Mladovsky P, McKee M - Eur J Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The overall decrease of TB cases observed in recent years has not been reflected in migrant populations.Foreign-born people with TB exhibit different socioeconomic and clinical characteristics than native sufferers.Strengthened information about health determinants and factors for migrants' vulnerability is needed to plan, implement and evaluate targeted TB care and control interventions for migrants in the EU/EEA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA 2 Unit of Public Health, University of Parma, Parma, Italy anna.odone@mail.harvard.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Notified migrant TB cases by country of birth or citizenship, EU/EEA 2000-10
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cku208-F1: Notified migrant TB cases by country of birth or citizenship, EU/EEA 2000-10

Mentions: Our analysis of the TESSy data showed that in 2010 the largest share of foreign-born TB cases were from Asia (34%), followed by Africa (22%) and other countries of the 53 countries of the WHO European region (13%). Of the cases coming from the WHO European region, 12% came from EU-Member States that joined prior to 2004, 56% came from EU-Member States that joined between 2004 and 2013 and 32% were from non-EU-Member States. The country of birth of foreign-born cases was unknown for 25% of migrant cases. Trends in the origin of foreign-born cases have been relatively stable over time, with the exception of an increase in the percentage of unknown country of birth between 2006 and 2008 (figure 1).Figure 1


Tuberculosis among migrant populations in the European Union and the European Economic Area.

Odone A, Tillmann T, Sandgren A, Williams G, Rechel B, Ingleby D, Noori T, Mladovsky P, McKee M - Eur J Public Health (2014)

Notified migrant TB cases by country of birth or citizenship, EU/EEA 2000-10
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4440450&req=5

cku208-F1: Notified migrant TB cases by country of birth or citizenship, EU/EEA 2000-10
Mentions: Our analysis of the TESSy data showed that in 2010 the largest share of foreign-born TB cases were from Asia (34%), followed by Africa (22%) and other countries of the 53 countries of the WHO European region (13%). Of the cases coming from the WHO European region, 12% came from EU-Member States that joined prior to 2004, 56% came from EU-Member States that joined between 2004 and 2013 and 32% were from non-EU-Member States. The country of birth of foreign-born cases was unknown for 25% of migrant cases. Trends in the origin of foreign-born cases have been relatively stable over time, with the exception of an increase in the percentage of unknown country of birth between 2006 and 2008 (figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: The overall decrease of TB cases observed in recent years has not been reflected in migrant populations.Foreign-born people with TB exhibit different socioeconomic and clinical characteristics than native sufferers.Strengthened information about health determinants and factors for migrants' vulnerability is needed to plan, implement and evaluate targeted TB care and control interventions for migrants in the EU/EEA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA 2 Unit of Public Health, University of Parma, Parma, Italy anna.odone@mail.harvard.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus